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GENfeALOGY  COLLECTION 


HISTORY 

OF 

OREGON 

Illustrated 

C.  H.Ca^^^U 

VOLUME  III 

CHICAGO— PORTLAND 

THE  PIONEER  HISTORICAL  PUBLISHING  COMPANY 

1922 

V 


1205989 


mix.    FRKn   W.    MULKKY 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


HON.  FRED  W.  MULKEY. 


Hon.  Fred  W.  Mulkey  has  twice  been  chosen  to  represent  Oregon  in  the  United 
States  senate  and  has  filled  various  other  positions  of  public  trust  which  have  indicated 
the  confidence  reposed  in  him  by  his  fellowmen  and  the  fact  that  he  has  never  in  the 
least  betrayed  their  trust.  At  the  same  time  he  has  gained  for  himself  a  place  in 
the  front  ranks  of  the  legal  profession  in  Portland  and  is.  moreover,  a  representative 
of  one  of  the  pioneer  families  of  the  state,  the  name  of  Mulkey  being  associated  with 
the  history  of  Oregon  from  an  early  period  in  its  settlement.  Fred  W.  Mulkey  was 
born  in  Po-tland,  January  6.  1874,  and  is  a  son  of  Marion  Francis  Mulkey,  whose  birth 
occurred  in  Johnson  county,  Missouri,  November  14,  1836.  The  grandfather  in  the 
paternal  line  was  Johnson  Mulkey,  who  in  1846  started  with  his  family  for  Oregon, 
traveling  across  the  plains  with  oxen  after  the  slow  and  tedious  manner  of  the  times, 
eventually  reaching  Benton  county,  where  Johnson  Mulkey  obtained  a  donation  land 
claim.  His  son.  Marion  F.,  then  a  youth  of  ten  years,  was  reared  on  the  farm  amid 
the  conditions  of  pioneer  life  and  in  the  acquirement  of  his  education  attended  the 
little  log  schoolhouse  in  the  home  neighborhood  until  he  had  opportunity  to  become 
a  pupil  in  the  college  at  Forest  Grove,  of  which  Dr.  S.  H.  Marsh,  one  of  the  noted 
educators  of  the  day,  was  then  principal.  When  the  Indians  went  on  the  warpath  in 
1856  he  was  still  pursuing  his  studies,  but  immediately  he  joined  the  military  forces 
that  were  organized  to  protect  the  frontier  settlers.  He  resumed  his  studies  when 
peace  was  restored  and  in  1858  went  east  to  become  a  student  in  Yale.  He  devoted 
four  years  to  his  university  course  and  was  graduated  in  1862.  after  which  he  returned 
to  Portland,  where  he  took  up  the  study  of  law  under  the  preceptorship  of  Judge  E.  D. 
Shattuck.  and  while  preparing  for  the  bar  he  filled  the  office  of  provost  marshal  in 
1863. 

In  1864  Marion  P.  Mulkey  was  admitted  to  practice  at  the  Oregon  bar  and  soon 
became  junior  partner  in  the  firm  of  Hill  &  Mulkey  as  the  associate  of  W.  Lair  Hill. 
No  dreary  novitiate  awaited  him  in  his  profession.  He  soon  gained  recognition  of  his 
powers  and  his  ability  increased  as  the  result  of  his  close  and  discriminating  study 
and  broadening  experience.  In  1866  he  was  chosen  for  the  office  of  prosecuting  attor- 
ney in  the  fourth  judicial  district  and  he  was  for  many  years  an  active  and  prominent 
figure  in  connection  with  the  public  interests  of  Oregon.  In  1867  he  was  elected  a 
member  of  the  city  council  from  the  third  ward  and  in  1872  and  again  in  1873  was 
elected  city  attorney.  Following  the  close  of  his  second  term  he  entered  into  partner- 
ship with  Hon.  J.  F.  Caples,  who  afterward  filled  the  office  of  district  attorney  for 
three  successive  terms.  Mr.  Mulkey  acting  as  his  deputy  during  that  period.  At  the 
bar,  too,  Mr.  Mulkey  made  steady  advancement  and  it  was  not  long  before  it  became 
a  recognized  fact  that  he  was  capable  of  crossing  swords  in  forensic  combat  with  the 
ablest,  for  his  forceful  arguments  and  logical  deductions,  combined  with  his  correct 
application  of  the  principles  of  law,  seldom  failed  to  win  for  him  the  verdict  desired. 
Realizing  that  Portland  w^s  destined  to  become  a  great  city  he  wisely  made  investment 
in  unimproved  property  from  time  to  time  and  erected  thereon  substantial  buildings, 
while  the  sale  of  his  real  estate  at  different  periods  brought  to  him  the  substantial 
rewards  of  his  labor  and  keen  insight.  He  was  the  builder  of  the  Mulkey  block  at 
the  corner  of  Second  and  Morrison  streets,  then  one  of  the  leading  architectural 
sti'uctures  of  Portland.  Politically  Mr.  Mulkey  was  a  republican  and  fraternally  was 
connected  with   the  Masons. 

In  1S62  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  M.  F.  Mulkey  and  Miss  Mary  E.  Porter 
of  New  Haven,  Connecticut,  who  belonged  to  one  of  the  prominent  families  of  that 
city.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mulkey  were  born  two  sons,  Frank  M.  and  Fred  W.  The  family 
circle  was  broken  by  the  hand  of  death  when  the  husband  and  father  passed  away 
February  25,  1889.  A  contemporary  writer  has  said  of  him:  "His  life  was  one  of 
5 


6  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

unswerving  integrity  and  exalted  honor,  and  the  public  press  vied  with  the  bar  in 
expressing  in  feeling  terms  the  deep  sense  of  irretrievable  loss  suffered  by  the  com- 
munity in  the  passing  of  this  high-minded  and  highly  respected  citizen." 

With  the  example  of  his  honored  father  to  serve  as  a  stimulus  in  his  career,  Fred 
W.  Mulkey  has  added  new  honors  to  the  family  name.  Liberal  educational  advan- 
tages were  accorded  him  and  he  completed  a  course  in  the  University  of  Oregon  as 
one  of  its  alumni  of  1896.  He  then  prepared  for  the  bar  in  the  New  York  Law  School 
of  New  York  city,  where  he  won  his  LL.  B.  degree  in  1S99.  From  the  beginning  of 
his  professional  career  he  has  made  steady  advancement  and  his  course  has  been  one 
which  reflects  credit  upon  the  profession,  while  at  the  same  time  he  has  achieved 
thereby  a  position  that  is  most  enviable. 

Moreover,  Mr.  Mulkey  has  almost  continuously  served  in  public  ofiBce.  He  was  a 
young  man  of  hut  twenty-six  years  when  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  Portland 
city  council  for  a  two-year  period  and  was  honored  with  the  presidency  thereof  during 
the  last  year  of  his  term.  He  has  always  made  a  close  study  of  the  question  of  taxation 
and  has  been  most  fearless  in  support  of  his  views,  which  he  has  ever  expressed  with 
remarkable  clearness  and  in  most  convincing  manner.  He  was  the  chairman  of  the 
Oregon  tax  commission,  the  report  of  which  received  favorable  comment  from  the 
best  tax  experts  in  the  United  States.  In  June,  1906,  he  was  elected  to  the  United 
States  senate  to  fill  out  the  unexpired  term  of  J.  H.  Mitchell,  deceased,  receiving  a 
plurality  of  fifty  thousand  and  becoming  the  unanimous  choice  of  the  state  legislature. 
From  1910  until  1915  he  was  chairman  of  the  public  dock  commission  of  Portland  and 
is  still  serving  as  a  member  of  the  commission.  In  1917  he  was  made  chairman  of  the 
committee  appointed  to  investigate  the  state  penitentiary  and  from  the  5th  of  Novem- 
ber, 1918.  until  the  17th  of  December  of  the  same  year  he  was  a  member  of  the 
United  States  senate  but  resigned  on  the  latter  date.  In  February,  1919,  he  became 
chairman  of  the  soldiers'  and  sailors'  committee  of  Oregon  and  is  still  acting  in  that 
capacity.  All  public  duties  he  has  assumed  with  a  sense  of  conscientious  obligation 
that  has  been  manifest  in  his  valuable  service,  his  course  being  one  of  great  usefulness 
along  many  lines. 


LESLIE   EUGENE   CROUCH. 


Leslie  Eugene  Crouch,  a  well  known  corporation  lawyer  of  Portland,  was  born 
in  Stockbridge,  Wisconsin,  July  28,  1878,  his  parents  being  John  0.  and  Elizabeth  J. 
fYoumans)  Crouch.  The  father,  also  a  native  of  Wisconsin,  was  a  farmer  by  occupa- 
tion but  passed  away  in  1879,  at  the  early  age  of  twenty-six  years.  The  mother  is 
still  living  and  now  makes  her  home  in  Seattle. 

Leslie  E.  Crouch  was  very  young  at  the  time  of  his  father's  death.  His  early 
education  was  acquired  in  district  schools  near  his  Wisconsin  home  and  in  the 
high  school  of  Stockbridge,  which  he  attended  from  1893  until  1897.  Subsequent"  to 
this  time  it  was  necessary  at  various  periods  that  he  provide  for  his  own  support  and 
he  was  employed  from  January,  1899,  until  July,  1902,  by  the  Great  Northern  Railroad 
Company  and  the  Chicago  &  Great  Western  Railroad  Company.  It  was  while  thus 
engaged  that  he  took  up  the  study  of  law,  for  a  commendable  ambition  prompted 
him  to  prepare  for  a  calling  that  would  give  him  wider  opportunity  and  greater  chance 
for  advancement.  In  1902  he  became  a  resident  of  Oregon  and  matriculated  in  the 
law  department  of  the  University  of  Oregon,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1904 
with  the  LL.  B.  degree.  In  June  of  that  year  he  was  admitted  at  Salem  to  practice 
in  the  Oregon  courts  and  in  the  latter  part  of  the  same  month  was  licensed  to  prac- 
tice in  the  United  States  district  and  circuit  courts.  He  then  became  the  professional 
associate  of  Rodney  L.  Glisan  and  specialized  upon  corporation  law,  abstracts  and 
titles.  Throughout  the  intervening  years  he  has  confined  his  attention  to  these  branches 
of  law  practice  and  his  constantly  broadening  experience,  his  thorough  study  and 
continued  research  have  made  him  one  of  the  ablest  representatives  of  corporation 
law  in  western  Oregon.  He  has  made  substantial  advancement  in  his  chosen  calling 
and  the  older  and  more  experienced  members  of  the  Portland  bar  soon  acknowledged 
his  worth,  and  he  today  enjoys  the  confidence  and  goodwill  of  his  colleagues  and 
contemporaries  before  the  bar.  Mr.  Crouch  was  made  attorney  for  the  civic  improve- 
ment board,  having  in  charge  the  cleaning  up  of  the  city  for  the  exposition  of  1905. 
He   became    interested    in    the    Almeda    Consolidated    Mines    Company,    owning    one    of 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  7 

Oregon's  largest  gold  and  copper  mines,  and  he  was  the  secretary  of  the  Crater  Lake 
Company,  which  developed  the  Crater  Lake  region  that  has  since  become  a  national 
park. 

On  the  11th  of  December,  1904,  Mr.  Crouch  was  married  to  Miss  Clara  B.  Frantz 
of  Seattle.  On  the  10th  of  September,  1913,  in  Tacoma.  Washington,  he  wedded  Ella 
Mae  Lynch.  His  military  history  covers  service  as  a  member  of  Company  F,  Third 
Infantry  of  the  Oregon  National  Guard,  which  he  joined  April  22,  1903.  and  on  the 
9th  of  September,  190S,  he  was  commissioned  captain.  He  attends  the  Episcopal 
church  and  is  interested  in  all  those  forces  which  make  for  a  better  citizenship  and 
higher  standards  for  mankind.  He  is  identified  with  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  is 
a  member  of  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  the  Ancient  Order  of  United 
Workmen.  He  has  become  a  thirty-second  degree  Mason  and  member  of  the  Mystic 
Shrine  and  is  a  past  grand  chancellor  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  of  Oregon,  while 
in  1920  he  was  supreme  representative  to  the  national  organization.  His  political 
views  have  always  been  in  accord  with  the  republican  party,  but  through  the  war 
period  he  stood  with  all  patriotic  citizens  in  support  of  the  various  projects  which 
upheld  American  interests  and  ideals,  serving  on  the  legal  advisory  board,  taking 
part  in  all  the  bond  drives  and  doing  much  other  patriotic  service.  Deprived  in 
early  boyhood  of  the  care  and  guidance  of  a  father,  he  early  developed  self-reliance 
and  independence  of  spirit,  and  individual  effort  has  brodght  him  to  the  present 
high  professional  and  social  position  which  he  today  occupies. 


DR.  CURTIS  EUGENE  MASON. 

A  native  Hoosier,  born  in  1880,  the  sou  of  William  and  Isabella  (Liggett)  Mason, 
Dr.  Curtis  Eugene  Mason,  a  prominent  physician  of  Beaverton.  spent  his  boyhood  in 
Missouri  after  the  immigration  of  his  parents  to  that  state,  receiving  his  education 
in  the  public  schools  there.  The  Masons  were  of  English  descent  and  were  Indiana 
pioneers  and  Dr.  Mason's  paternal  grandfather  served  in  the  Civil  war,  participating 
in  Sherman's  march  to  the  sea.  Graduating  from  high  school  Curtis  Eugene  Mason 
matriculated  at  the  University  of  Chicago  and  later  at  Rush  Medical  College  from 
which  latter  institution  he  graduated  in  1911  with  the  degree  of  M.  D.  He  came  to 
Oregon  the  same  year  and  entered  on  hospital  work  in  Portland,  practicing  for  four 
years  with  Dr.  Bodine  of  that  city.  Removing  in  1917  to  Beaverton  he  began  his 
practice  there.  He  was  at  this  time  enlisted  in  the  Medical  Reserve  Corps  and  was 
prepared  to  serve  in  France  should  he  be  called.  Fortunately  for  those  dependent  upon 
his  medical  services  at  home,  and  they  were  many,  no  such  necessity  presented  itself 
during  the  war  and  Dr.  Mason  continued  to  devote  himself  to  his  practice. 

Iii  1912,  Dr.  Mason  was  united  in  marriage  to  Bertha  Clement,  the  daughter  of  a 
retired  banker  of  Wisconsin  now  a  poultry  fancier  in  Washington  county,  Oregon. 
Mrs.  Mason  is  a  graduate  of  the  University  of  Chicago  and  was  for  some  years  an 
educator.  Their  children  are  all  boys:  Herbert  Eugene,  John  William  and  David 
Clement. 

Dr.  Mason  is  a  deacon  of  the  Congregational  church  and  a  member  of  the  board 
of  trustees.  Fraternally  his  affiliations  are  several.  He  is  a  Mason  in  more  than  name 
and  a  Woodman  of  the  World.  He  belongs  to  the  Multnomah  Medical  Society,  the 
State  Medical  Society  and  the  American  Medical  Association.  While  his  practice  is  a 
general  one  Dr.  Mason  has  long  been  interested  in  the  diseases  of  children  and  in  a 
larger  community  would  specialize  in  that  branch  of  his  profession.  Though  still  a 
young  man  he  has  built  up  an  extensive  practice  and  stands  high  in  the  esteem  of  the 
people  of  Washington  county,  particularly  among  those  who  are  his  compatriots. 


JAMES  EDWARD   McCLINTOCK. 

James  Edward  McClintock,  president  of  the  Commercial  Abstract  Company  of 
Roseburg  and  a  member  of  the  city  council  of  that  city,  was  born  in  Missouri  in  1869, 
a  son  of  Rev.  Alfred  and  Nancy  J.  (Bell)  McClintock.  His  father  was  born  in  Canada 
and  was  a  minister  of  the  Methodist  church.  Coming  to  the  United  States  he  first 
served   in   Iowa,  and   later  in   Missouri,  and   is   now   living  retired,  a  resident   of  Spo- 


8  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

kane,  Washington.  The  Bell  family  were  pioneers  in  Iowa  and  Ohio  and  the  name 
is   indelibly  written  on   the  history  of  those   states. 

James  Edward  McClintock  received  his  education  in  the  grade  schools  of  Iowa 
and  when  seventeen  years  of  age  entered  the  railroad  service.  At  eighteen  he  was 
station  agent  and  for  thirteen  years  served  in  that  connection.  At  the  end  of  that 
time  he  became  a  buyer  for  a  large  grain  firm  and  traveled  in  that  capalcity  for  three 
years.  In  1900  he  was  elected  treasurer  of  Cherokee  county,  Iowa,  and  reelected  in 
1902.  At  the  termination  of  his  service  in  that  office  he  started  west  and  purchasing 
land  near  Spokane,  Washington,  became  an  orchardist.  .  He  followed  that  work  until 
1912,  when  he  disposed  of  his  orchard  and  settled  at  Roseburg.  entering  the  real 
estate  business.  He  continued  in  that  connection  until  1915.  when  he  purchased  the 
Commercial  Abstract  Company,  of  which  he  is  now  president.  Mr.  McClintock  has 
been  a  prominent  member  of  the  city  council  of  Roseburg  for  the  past  six  years  and 
as  chairman  of  the  fire  and  water  committee  he  has  especially  rendered  good  service. 
To  him  the  city  owes  a  debt  of  gratitude,  for  he  was  a  dominant  factor  in  securing 
a  paid  fire  department,  which  is  equipped  with  the  most  modern  fire  fighting  appara- 
tus. He  takes  much  interest  in  public  affairs  and  has  been  both  president  and  vice 
president  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  which  he  is  now  serving  as  one  of  its  board 
of  directors.  He  may  always  be  counted  upon  to  furnish  his  share  of  time  and  money 
in  the  furtherance  of  any  movement  he  deems  of  value  to  the  welfare  of  the  com- 
munity and   he  is  readily  conceded   to  be  a   representative  citizen. 

In  18S9  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  McClintock  and  Miss  Lulu  B.  Woodhouse, 
a  daughter  of  John  L.  Woodhouse,  a  weH  known  banker  and  farmer  of  Iowa  and  Kansas. 
Four  children  have  been  born  to  their  marriage:  Leon  E.;  John  L.;  James  A.  and 
Vera.  Leon  E.  is  the  secretary-treasurer  of  the  abstract  company  and  a  veteran  of 
the  World  war.  He,  with  his  brother,  John  L.,  was  one  of  the  first  to  take  up  arms 
for  his  country,  and  after  receiving  his  training  at  Fort  Stevens  was  sent  to  France, 
where  he  served  thirteen  months.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Sixty-fifth  regiment  whose 
seventy  days  on  the  battle  front  commencing  with  the  battle  of  the  Argonne  is  a 
matter  of  historical  pride  to  the  whole  of  America.  His  brother,  John  L.,  now  vice 
president  of  the  abstract  company,  also  served  in  France  and  with  the  same  degree 
of  devotion  to  duty  as  that  of  his  elder  brother  but  the  command  to  which  he  was 
attached  did  not  participate  in  as  many  conflicts  as  the  Sixty-fifth.  James  A.,  the 
third  member  of  the  family,  is  a  student  in  the  Rosebui-g  high  school,  and  Vera  the 
youngest   and   the   only   daughter   is  still   attending   grade   school. 

Fraternally  Mr.  McClintock  is  identified  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  he  is 
an  exemplary  member  of  that  order.  He  devotes  the  greater  portion  of  his  time  to 
his  business  interests  and  the  Commercial  Abstract  Company  is  the  most  complete 
plant  of  its  kind  in  Douglas  county  and  is  corrected  daily,  so  that  the  records  are  always 
up  to  date.  Mr.  McClintock  is  deservedly  popular  in  Douglas  county,  where  he  is 
accounted  one  of  the  best  citizens  and  his  boys  give  promise  of  following  in  their 
father's   footsteps. 


HON.  J.  M.  MOVER. 


In  the  passing  of  J.  M.  Moyer  of  Brownsville.  Oregon  lost  one  of  her  honored 
pioneers  who  came  to  this  state  in  1852  and  subsequently  became  identified  with  manu- 
facturing and  financial  interests  on  an  extensive  scale,  and  who  in  the  attainment  of 
individual  success  contributed  in  substantial  measure  to  the  development  and  upbuild- 
ing of  the  commonwealth.  He  was  energetic  and  determined  and  what  he  undertook 
he  accomplished. 

Mr.  Moyer  was  born  in  Schuylkill  county,  Pennsylvania,  in  1829,  a  son  of  Gabriel 
and  Hannah  (Andrews)  Moyer,  also  natives  of  the  Keystone  state.  The  father  was  a 
cooper  by  trade  and  also  engaged  in  farming.  In  1830  he  removed  with  his  family  to 
Trumbull  county.  Ohio,  and  subsequently  went  to  Mahoning  county,  that  state,  pur- 
chasing ninety-one  acres  in  the  timber.  He  at  once  began  the  arduous  task  of  clearing 
and  developing  his  land,  erecting  thereon  a  log  cabin,  and  during  the  winter  seasons 
lie  followed  his  trade  of  carpenter.  In  1848  they  removed  to  Medina  county  and  there 
the  father  likewise  engaged  in  farming,  continuing  a  resident  of  that  locality  the  re- 
mainder of  his  life.     In  the  family  were  fifteen  children,  of  whom  but  one  is  living. 

J.  M.  Moyer  attended  school   in   Ohio  and   remained  under  the  parental   roof   until 


HON.  J.   M.  MOYER 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  11 

1848,  when  he  began  learning  the  carpenter's  trade  and  followed  that  occupation  until 
1852,  when,  in  partnership  with  J.  P.  Colbert,  he  purchased  a  wagon,  three  horses  and 
a  stock  of  grain  and  provisions  and  started  for  Oregon.  They  were  three  months  in 
making  the  trip,  arriving  at  Foster.  Oregon,  on  the  9th  of  August,  1852,  and  after  allow- 
ing their  horses  a  much  needed  rest  they  sold  them  and  with  an  outfit  of  blankets,  a 
hatchet  and  a  piece  of  rope  they  started  for  the  Calapooya  river.  On  reaching  the  home 
of  Elias  Waters,  a  settler  residing  near  Brownsville,  they  stopped  to  rest  and  being 
favorably  impressed  with  the  locality  Mr.  Moyer  decided  to  locate  here  permanently. 
He  began  work  at  the  carpenter's  trade,  which  he  continued  to  follow  until  1855,  when 
he  purchased  a  herd  of  cattle  and  in  the  spring  of  the  following  year  started  for  Cali- 
fornia, but  the  adventure  proved  disastrous  and  he  returned  to  Oregon.  In  1857  he 
settled  on  a  tract  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  near  Brownsville  and  later  purchased 
Kixty  acres  adjoining,  devoting  his  attention  to  the  cultivation  and  improvement  of  his 
land.  He  began  housekeeping  in  a  box  house  with  no  doors  or  windows,  but,  utilizing 
his  knowledge  of  carpentering,  he  was  soon  able  to  provide  himself  with  furniture  and 
other  necessary  conveniences,  and  in  that  manner  he  spent  the  winter.  When  the  new 
town  of  Brownsville  was  laid  out  by  James  Blakely  he  purchased  a  tew  lots,  on  which 
he  built  a  box  house  and  there  resided  with  his  family,  working  at  his  trade  until  1862, 
when  he  joined  the  rush  of  gold  seekers  to  Florence,  Idaho,  making  his  way  across  the 
mountains  with  pack  mules.  He  did  not  meet  with  success  in  this  venture,  however, 
and  after  an  outlay  of  eight  hundred  dollars  returned  to  Brownsville,  where  he  con- 
tinued to  follow  his  trade  until  April,  1863,  when  he  removed  to  the  location  of  th& 
present  family  home.  Purchasing  a  sash  and  door  factory  at  North  Brownsville,  he 
greatly  improved  the  plant,  installing  therein  new  machinery  and  other  necessary  equip- 
ment, and  by  persistent  effort  and  unremitting  energy  he  succeeded  in  developing  an 
extensive  business,  but  the  strain  upon  his  health  proved  too  severe  and  he  subsequently 
rented  the  mill.  In  1860  he  had  organized  in  association  with  others,  the  Linn  Woolen 
Mill  at  Brownsville,  which  in  1862  was  destroyed  by  fire.  Two  years  later  the  mill 
was  rebuilt  and  the  business  was  re-organized  under  the  name  of  'the  Eagle  Woolen  Mill, 
after  which  the  plant  continued  to  operate  for  six  years,  when  the  company  became 
involved  in  litigation  which  continued  for  about  five  years  or  until  1875,  when  the 
entire  property  was  sold  to  a  syndicate  organized  by  Mr.  Moyer  and  the  Brownsville 
Woolen  Company  was  incorporated.  Of  this  company  he  became  president  and  under 
the  new  management  success  attended  the  enterprise,  its  trade  increasing  from  year 
to  year.  In  January,  1889,  the  property  was  sold  and  in  the  same  year  Mr.  Moyer 
purchased  a  clothing  stock  at  First  and  Alder  streets  in  Portland.  In  that  year  he  also 
organized  the  Albany  Woolen  Mill,  of  which  he  became  president,  so  serving  until  his 
demise.  In  1888  he  had  entered  financial  circles,  becoming  one  of  the  incorporators 
of  the  Bank  of  Brownsville,  of  which  he  was  made  president,  which  office  he  continued 
to  fill  throughout  the  remainder  of  his  life.  Still  further  extending  his  efforts  in  this 
field,  he  organized  the  Bank  of  Woodburn  in  1890  and  became  its  vice  president,  occupy- 
ing that  responsible  position  for  many  years.  Being  a  man  of  resourceful  business 
ability,  he  continually  broadened  the  scope  of  his  activities  and  whatever  he  undertook 
he  carried  forward  to  successful  completion.  He  became  the  owner  of  large  property 
holdings  in  Brownsville  and  Linn  county  and  also  in  Portland,  where  he  established 
a  chain  of  stores  which  are  now  known  as  the  Moyer  stores.  He  was  a  man  of  unusual 
business  ability,  foresight  and  enterprise,  whose  entire  career  was  actuated  by  pro- 
gressiveness  and  dominated  by  the  spirit  of  fair  dealing. 

On  the  4th  of  June,  1857,  Mr.  Moyer  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Elizabeth  D. 
Brown,  a  daughter  of  Hugh  L.  and  Clara  (Browning)  Brown,  natives  of  Tennessee.  Her 
parents  became  pioneers  of  Oregon,  coming  to  this  state  in  1846  and  casting  in  their 
lot  with  its  earliest  settlers.  The  father  took  up  land  in  Linn  county,  one  mile  from 
Brownsville,  which  town  was  afterward  named  in  his  honor.  He  cleared  and  developed 
his  land,  which  he  continued  to  operate  most  successfully  for  a  number  of  years  and 
then  sold.  Retiring  from  active  business,  he  took  up  his  residence  in  Brownsville 
and  here  he  continued  to  live  until  his  demise  in  ISSS.  when  he  had  attained  the  age 
of  seventy-eight  years.  The  mother  passed  away  ten  years  later,  in  1898,  having  reached 
the  venerable  age  of  eighty-eight  years.  Both  were  highly  esteemed  residents  of  their 
community  and  Mr.  Brown  was  a  public-spirited  and  progressive  citizen,  representing 
his  district  in  the  state  legislature,  where  he  gave  thoughtful  and  earnest  consideration 
to  all  the  vital  questions  which  came  up  for  settlement.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Moyer  were 
born  six  children,  three  of  whom  died  in  infancy,  while  Ethel  died  at  the  age  of  three 
years;   Edward  D.  was  born  in  1858  and  passed  away  in  January,  1916,  at  the  age  of 


12  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

fifty-seven  years,  leaving  a  wife  and  one  child;  Hugh  B.  was  born  in  1861  and  his  death 
occurred  in  1913,  when  he  was  forty-eight  years  of  age.  He  was  survived  by  a  wife  and 
one  child,  but  the  latter  died  in  January,  1917. 

Mr.  Moyer  gave  his  political  allegiance  to  the  democratic  party  and  fraternally  he 
was  identified  with  the  Masonic  order,  holding  membership  in  the  chapter.  He  passed 
away  on  the  25th  of  July.  1904,  and  his  death  was  the  occasion  of  deep  and  widespread 
regret  to  all  who  knew  him,  for  his  sterling  traits  of  character  had  won  for  him  many 
friends,  and  his  stanchest  friends  were  those  who  knew  him  longest  and  best,  indicating 
that  his  life  was  well  spent.  Throughout  the  period  of  his  residence  in  Brownsville 
he  took  a  most  active  and  helpful  part  in  the  work  of  progress  and  improvement,  leav- 
ing the  impress  of  his  individuality  for  good  upon  many  lines  of  the  state's  develop- 
ment and  upbuilding.  He  was  a  man  of  whom  it  could  well  be  said:  "The  world  was 
better  for  his  having  lived  in  it."  Mrs.  Moyer  is  residing  in  the  old  family  home  in 
Brownsville,  which  her  husband  erected  in  1S81,  and  of  her  immediate  family  but  three 
now  remain,  one  grandchild  and  two  great-grandchildren.  She  is  a  lady  of  culture  and 
refinement,  possessing  many  admirable  traits  of  character,  and  as  a  representative  of 
one  of  the  oldest  and  most  honored  families  in  the  state  she  is  highly  esteemed  and 
respected  by  an  extensive  circle  of  friends. 


EDWIN  SPURGEON  SPARKS. 

Before  the  American  War  of  Independence  one  Solomon  Sparks,  of  Welsh  descent, 
came  to  America  and  settled  in  the  future  land  of  the  free.  With  him  came  his  wife, 
Katharine  Hildercost.  They  settled  in  Pennsylvania,  and  there  was  born  to  them  a 
son  whom  they  named  Levi.  This  son  moved  to  Ohio  and  from  there  to  Iowa  in  the 
early  '40s.  In  the  locality  where  he  filed  upon  a  homestead,  most  of  the  surrounding 
land  had  been  taken  by  men  from  one  locality  in  an  eastern  state.  These  men  had 
pledged  themselves  to  allow  no  outsider  to  settle  there.  They  looked  with  hostile  eyes 
upon  the  newcomer  as  he  erected  his  little  cabin,  and  one  night  with  their  features 
disguised  with  white  cloths  they  invaded  his  domain  and  calling  him  to  his  door  they 
ordered  him  to  move  on.  He  told  them  he  was  there  by  permission  of  the  government 
which  had  given  him  his  land,  that  he  had  every  reason  to  believe  the  government 
would  protect  him,  and  that  there  he  would  remain.  Admiring  his  courage  and  deter- 
mination the  men  rode  away  and  did  not  molest  him  further  but  on  the  contrary  soon 
became  his  friends  and  in  a  short  time  he  became  a  power  in  the  community.  He  had 
married  Zulima  Craig  Moore,  a  blue-blooded  Virginian  who  was  a  relative  of  Thomas 
:\Ioore.  the  Irish  poet.     To  them  was  born  a  son  whom  they  called  Levi,  Jr. 

This  son  Levi  married  Savilla  Spurgeon,  a  daughter  of  the  American  branch  of  the 
English  family  of  which  the  famous  Dr.  Spurgeon  was  a  member,  Levi  and  Savilla 
Sparks  went  to  the  Pacific  coast  and  settled  in  Clark  county,  Washington,  where  on 
June  12,  1877,  Edwin  S.  Sparks  was  born.  His  parents  moved  to  Washington  county 
when  he  was  five  years  of  age,  and  located  on  a  farm  where  they  lived  until  the  subject 
of  this  sketch  at  the  age  of  twelve  years  lost  his  right  arm  through  the  accidental 
discharge  of  a  shotgun.  His  parents  then  moved  to  Forest  Grove,  where  Mr.  Sparks 
as  a  boy  attended  the  grade  and  high  schools.  After  leaving  school  he  took  up  journal- 
ism as  a  profession  and  followed  this  until  1916,  when  he  was  elected  treasurer  of  Forest 
Grove,  also  having  charge  of  the  municipal  light  and  water  system.  He  held  this  office 
for  four  years  and  in  1920  was  elected  city  recorder,  retaining  his  other  duties  with 
the  city. 

In  1913  Mr.  Sparks  was  married  to  Miss  Frances  Hiebel,  daughter  of  Frank  Hiebel, 
a  merchant  of  Waterloo,  Wisconsin,  and  to  them  has  been  born  a  son,  Spurgeon,  who 
promises  to  do  honor  to  the  names  of  his  ancestors.  Mrs.  Sparks  was  a  school  teacher 
before  her  marriage  and  a  woman  of  many  talents,  as  is  characteristic  of  her  family, 
all  of  her  brothers  and  sisters  being  artists  and  musicians,  as  she  herself  is.  One  of 
her  sisters  is  chief  artist  for  the  largest  high  class  calendar  engraving  firm  in  the  world. 
Mrs.  Sparks  is  active  in  women's  affairs.  She  is  a  member  of  the  Women's  Club,  in 
which  organization  she  has  held  various  oflSces,  and  she  is  also  a  member  of  the  Rebekah 
lodge. 

Air.  Sparks  is  an  Odd  Fellow  and  has  served  as  treasurer  of  the  lodge.  Although 
he  has  ceased   to   "push   the   pen"  commercially,   Mr.   Sparks   occasionally   writes  some 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  l: 

excellent  verses.     The  accompanying  poem,  written   in  1917.  shows  move  than  ordinar 
ability: 

HYMN  TO  AMERICA. 
By  Edwin  8.  Sparkx. 

Freedom  calls!     Awaken!     Heeding 

Xow  the  cry  across  the  se3. 

Hearts  oppressed  today  are  pleading. 

Pleading  now  to  you  and  me. 

Will  we  falter  in  our  duty. 

Fail  to  battle  for  the  right? 

No!     Our  Flag  in  all   its  beauty 

Shall    oppose   the   tyrant's   might! 

Aged   sires   will   tell   the   story. 
When  that  emblem  bright  they  see, 
How   the   Stars   in  deathless  glory. 
Won  a  peace  that  made  men  free. 
This  has  been  the  dream  of  ages. 
Leading  to  a  better  way: 
This   will   be   the   theme   of   sages. 
Even  to  the  perfect  day! 

By  the  blood  of  those  who  perished. 
That  our  laws  and  land  might  live — 
By  the  mem'ry  of  our  cherished. 
All   we   have   we   freely   give! 
Stern  the  call  and  stern  the  measure; 
Not  in  anger  but  in  love, 
Give  we  now  our  lives  and   treasure. 
Seeking  guidance  from  above. 


RALPH  A.   COAN, 


Ralph  A,  Coan,  for  twelve  years  an  active  representative  of  the  Portland  bar, 
was  born  in  Boulder,  Colorado,  May  22,  1881.  His  father,  Alonzo  Coan,  is  a  native  of 
Exeter,  Maine,  born  on  the  5th  of  June,  1842,  he  is  descended  on  a  direct  line  from 
the  Pilgrims,  and  is  a  member  of  the  Mayflower  Society.  Following  the  outbreak  of  the 
Civil  war  he  served  in  the  Fifteenth  Maine  Volunteer  Infantry  throughout  the  period 
of  hostilities  with  the  rank  of  captain.  In  1S66  he  removed  to  Missouri  and  was  married 
in  that  state  to  Miss  Etta  Lancaster.  Some  time  afterward  he  became  a  resident  of 
Colorado,  where  he  has  since  been  known  as  a  mine  operator,  making  his  home  at  the 
present  time  in  Boulder,     His  wife,  however,  passed  away  in  1902. 

Ralph  A.  Coan  is  indebted  to  the  public  school  system  of  Boulder  for  the  educational 
opportunities  which  he  enjoyed  in  his  youth.  He  next  entered  the  University  of  Colorado 
there  and  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1904,  with  the  degree  of  B.  A.  He  then  went 
east  to  New  York  city,  where  he  entered  Columbia  University  for  the  study  of  law  and 
received  his  LL.  D.  degree  in  1906.  In  the  same  year  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  and 
entered  upon  the  practice  of  his  profession  in  his  native  city  but  later  in  the  same  year 
removed  to  the  northwest,  settling  first  in  Vancouver,  Washington,  where  he  devoted 
his  attention  to  law  practice  until  190S.  In  that  year  he  came  to  Portland  and  has  since 
been  a  represenative  of  the  bar  of  this  city.  Along  with  the  requisites  of  the  successful 
lawyer  he  brought  to  the  starting  point  of  his  career  certain  rare  gifts — a  dignified 
presence,  a  good  command  of  language  and  a  laudable  ambition.  These  qualities  have 
been  contributing  elements  to  his  continuous  advancement  in  a  profession  where  progress 
depends  entirely  upon  individual  merit.  He  is  likewise  a  director  of  the  Lawyers  Title 
&  Trust  Company  and  is  the  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Portland  Mausoleum  Com- 
pany. 

On  the  27th  of  October,  1908,  in  Nevada,  Missouri,  Mr.  Coan  was  married  to  Miss 
Pansey  Burton,  a  daughter  of  Hon.  Charles  G.  Burton,  past  commander  in  chief  of  the 
Grand  Army  of  the  Republic.  Their  children  are;  Burton  L„  born  September  3,  1910: 
and  Ralph  Gorman,  born  May  .30,  1913.     Mr.  and  Mrs.  Coan  attend  the  Christian  Science 


1-1  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

church  and  his  political  endorsement' is  given  to  the  republican  party.  Fraternally  he 
is  a  Knight  Templar  Mason  and  member  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  and  is  now  serving  as 
worshipful  master  of  Imperial  Lodge,  No.  159,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.  and  a  member  of  the  Military 
Order  of  the  Loyal  Legion  of  the  United  States.  He  likewise  belongs  to  the  Benevolent 
Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  his  fraternal  relations  extend  to  the  Delta  Tau  Delta  and 
the  Phi  Beta  Kappa.  During  the  World  war  he  did  efficient  service  for  his  government 
as  secretary  of  the  Multnomah  legal  advisory  board,  as  government  appeal  agent  for 
Board  No.  1  and  also  as  one  of  the  Four-Minute  men. 


AMOS   LUTHER   MINER. 


Amos  Luther  Miner,  becoming  a  resident  of  Oregon  in  1885,  was  thereafter  identi- 
fied with  mining  interests  and  real  estate  activities  in  Oregon  and  Alaska.  He  was 
born  in  Clinton  county,  New  York,  in  1S37,  his  parents  being  Clements  D.  and  Lydia 
(Dominy)  Miner.  The  early  years  of  his  lite  were  spent  in  the  east.  In  fact  he  did 
not  come  to  Oregon  until  1SS5,  at  which  time  he  took  up  his  abode  in  St.  Johns.  There 
he  purchased  ninety-seven  acres  of  land  and  with  the  development  of  the  city  he  laid 
out  Miner's  addition  to  St.  Johns.  He  turned  his  attention  to  farming,  bringing  his 
land  under  a  high  state  of  cultivation  and  he  was  also  connected  with  mining  interests 
and  with  real  estate  operations.  In  fact  he  readily  recognized  business  opportunities 
which  he  utilized  to  excellent  advantage,  his  sound  judgment  enabling  him  readily  to 
discriminate  between  the  essential  and  the  non-essential  in  business  affairs.  His  wise 
investments  and  his  capable  management  of  his  business  interests  brought  to  him  a 
very  substantial  measure  of  success.  He  also  became  the  owner  of  mines  in  Alaska 
and  made  two  trips  to  that  country.  He  was  a  millwright  and  followed  the  trade  of 
machinist  and  millwright  at  Minneapolis  before  coming  west,  but  never  worked 
along  that  line  after  his  removal  to  the  west,  giving  his  attention  to  his  farming  and 
his  invested  interests. 

On  the  3d  of  January,  1859,  Mr.  Miner  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Sarah 
E.  Beebe  and  to  them  were  born  six  children:  Ardella  Lilian;  Mary  Elizabeth;  one 
who  died  in  infancy;  Lydia  Delia;  Charles  Luther;  and  Grace  Edna.  The  daughter, 
Mary  E.,  is  the  widow  of  Samuel  Spence  Beebe  and  Lydia  D.  is  the  wife  of  Ralph 
Crysler. 

Mr.  Miner  was  a  republican  in  his  political  views  and  while  residing  in  St.  Johns 
filled  the  office  of  city  clerk.  He  was  always  interested  in  public  affairs  and  his  aid 
and  influence  were  ever  on  the  side  of  progress  and  improvement.  His  life's  labors 
were  ended  in  death  on  the  20th  of  December,  1919.  He  had  been  a  resident  of  Oregon 
for  more  than  a  third  of  a  century  and  was  keenly  Interested  in  everything  that 
pertained  to  the  welfare  and  progress  of  the  state,  while  at  all  times  he  gave  helpful 
support  to  measures  for  the  public  good. 


FRANCIS  M.  KENT. 


For  many  years  Francis  M.  Kent  was  prominent  in  the  agricultural  circles  of 
Umatilla  county.  He  retired,  however,  from  active  farm  life  in  1913  and  since  that  time 
has  been  residing  in  Milton,  where  he  is  a  well  known  and  highly  respected  citizen. 
Mr.  Kent  is  a  native  of  Coshocton  county.  Ohio,  where  he  was  born  October  12,  1857, 
a  son  of  Isaac  and  Sena  (Sutton)  Kent.  Both  parents  were  natives  of  the  same  locality 
and  there  resided  throughout  their  lives. 

Francis  M.  Kent  received  his  education  in  the  common  schools  of  his  native  county, 
where  he  remained  until  he  was  eighteen  years  of  age,  at  which  time  he  determined 
to  come  west.  In  1877  he  arrived  in  Butte  county,  California,  where  he  worked  for 
some  time  and  in  18S0  made  the  trip  overland  to  Milton,  then  a  small  place  consisting 
of  but  two  stores  and  a  few  homes.  He  purchased  three  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of 
land  at  twelve  dollars  per  acre  and  after  improving  it  added  a  half  section  and  operated 
this  land  until  1913.  As  a  farmer  he  was  very  successful  and  in  1913  decided  to  retire 
from  active  farm  lite  and  remove  to  Milton,  renting  out  his  farm.  He  followed  this  plan 
and  is  now  residing  retired  in  his  home  at  Mill  and  Second  streets.     Since  settling  in 


AMOS   L.   MINER 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  17 

Milton  he  has  taken  a  sincere  interest  in  the  welfare  of  the  community  and  has  served 
his  fellow  citizens  as  a  member  of  the  council  for  several  terms. 

In  1883  Mr.  Kent  was  married  to  Miss  Frances  Barber,  a  daughter  of  Thomas  and 
Lucy  (James)  Barber,  and  a  native  of  Missouri.  Mrs.  Kent  had  crossed  the  plains 
when  just  a  girl  with  her  parents  who  settled  in  the  Willamette  valley,  later  removing 
to  Weston,  Umatilla  county,  and  subsequently  six  miles  southeast  of  Milton,  where  her 
father  took  a  preemption  claim  and  also  purchased  some  government  land.  Her  parents 
both  died  on  this  homestead.  In  1918  Mrs.  Kent's  death  occurred  at  the  age  of  tifty-two 
years,  an  occasion  of  deep  bereavement  to  her  many  friends  in  the  community.  She  had 
become  the  mother  of  two  children,  who  still  survive:  Maud,  now  Mrs.  R.  E.  Eikenburg 
of  Walla  Walla,  Washington;  and  Herma,  who  is  the  wife  of  E.  B.  Maleroy  of  Walla 
Walla,  Washington. 

The  political  faith  of  Mr.  Kent  is  that  of  the  republican  party,  in  the  interests  of 
which  he  takes  an  active  part.  He  is  a  consistent  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal 
church  and  holds  membership  in  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen.  He  has  been  a 
prominent  factor  in  the  agricultural  development  of  the  county  and  is  accounted  an 
exemplary  citizen  of  Milton. 


GRIFFORD  VIRGIL  BOLTON. 

An  interesting  story  of  earnest  endeavor,  intelligently  directed,  constitutes  the  life 
record  of  Grifford  Virgil  Bolton,  who  was  for  many  years  actively  and  prominently 
associated  with  banking  interests  of  The  Dalles.  Moreover,  he  was  a  native  son  of 
Oregon  and  throughout  his  life  was  a  supporter  of  all  the  well  devised  plans  and 
measures  for  the  upbuilding  of  his  city  and  state.  His  birth  occurred  near  The  Dalles 
in  the  year  1863,  his  parents  being  Daniel  and  Elizabeth  (Fulwider)  Bolton.  Both  were 
natives  of  Virginia  and  representatives  of  old  families  of  that  state.  At  an  early  day 
they  journeyed  westward  to  become  residents  of  Oregon  and  took  up  their  abode  on 
a  farm  in  the  vicinity  of  The  Dalles  on  Fifteen  Mile  creek,  where  occurred  the  birth 
of  their  son  Virgil. 

The  latter  in  the  acquirement  of  his  education  attended  the  public  schools  of  The 
Dalles  and  then  initiated  his  business  career  by  entering  the  bank  of  French  &  Com- 
pany when  he  was  a  youth  of  nineteen  years.  He  first  served  in  a  clerical  capacity  but 
bent  every  energy  toward  acquainting  himself  with  the  banking  business  in  principle 
and  detail  and  his  thoroughness,  his  industry  and  loyalty  won  him  promotions  from 
time  to  time  until  he  soon  became  cashier  and  one  of  the  chief  executive  officers  of  the 
institution.  He  continued  to  hold  that  position  until  his  death,  which  occurred  on 
the  7th  of  March,  1895,  when  he  was  but  thirty-two  years  of  age.  Although  he  passed 
away  at  a  comparatively  early  age  he  had  accomplished  much  more  than  many  a  man 
of  twice  his  years.  He  had  made  for  himself  a  most  creditable  position  in  financial 
circles,  enjoying  an  unassailable  reputation  for  business  integrity  as  well  as  enterprise. 

On  the  28th  of  March,  1889,  Mr.  Bolton  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Nellie  J. 
French  and  they  became  the  parents  of  two  daughters:  Carmel  French,  who  is  now 
the  wife  of  Frank  A.  Ryder  of  Portland:  and  Nonearle  French,  who  is  at  home  with 
her  mother.  Mr.  Bolton  was  always  keenly  interested  in  public  affairs  at  The  Dalles 
and  recognition  of  his  public  spirit  and  his  devotion  to  the  general  good  was  manifest 
in  his  election  to  the  mayoralty.  He  belonged  to  the  Masonic  fraternity  of  which  he 
was  an  exemplary  representative  and  his  entire  life  was  characterized  by  those  qualities 
which  in  every  land  and  clime  awaken  confidence  and  respect.  His  widow  is  now  living 
at  Alexandra  Court,  in  Portland  and  is  well  known  in  the  best  circles  of  the  Rose  City. 


HON.  ROBERT  D.  INMAN. 


Perseverance  in  the  face  of  great  obstacles  coupled  with  earnestness  of  purpose 
marked  to  an  unusual  degree  the  life  of  Hon.  Robert  D.  Inman.  who  blazed  a  distinct 
trail  in  the  lumber  industry  of  the  northwest.  Mr.  Inman  had  his  origin  in  true  pioneer 
stock,  his  forbears  coming  to  America  long  before  the  Revolutionary  war.  True  to  the 
traditions  of  his  ancestors  he  fought  a  great  fight  for  success  in  life  and  when  he  had 


18  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

attained  a  position  well  toward  the  top  of  the  list  of  lumber  manufacturers  on  the  Ameri- 
can continent,  he  was  able  to  wear  his  laurels  with  true  grace  and  unquestioned  credit 
to  himself. 

The  life  history  of  Mr.  Inman,  if  written  by  a  master  hand,  would  read  like  a 
fairy  tale  except  for  the  hardships  endured.  He  struggled  for  a  place  in  the  pro- 
ductive activities  of  his  country  and  his  rise  from  a  towboy  at  the  age  of  nine  years 
on  a  canal  in  Ohio  to  the  head  of  a  lumber  concern  with  world-wide  distribution  dem- 
onstrates the  power  of  constructive  thought  and  the  value  of  courageous  and  unselfish 
friendship,  for  among  all  the  treasures  left  by  Robert  D.  Inman  no  part  of  them  will 
compare  in  true  value  with  the  multitude  of  friends  who  loved  him  for  his  manly  worth, 
who  shared  in  his  success  and  who  mourned  his  passing  as  a  personal  affliction. 

Robert  David  Inman  was  born  near  Piqua,  Ohio.  August  11,  1S53.  His  parents  were 
Asa  and  Lucinda  (Kendall)  Inman.  His  ancestors  came  to  this  country  during  the 
latter  part  of  the  seventeenth  century,  settling  in  Vermont.  For  generations  the  for- 
bears of  young  Inman  had  been  farmers  and  as  tillers  of  the  soil  the  first  American 
representatives  started  life  anew  among  the  forbidding  hills  of  New  England.  Asa 
Inman,  grandfather  of  Robert,  took  up  the  business  of  contracting  and  building  as  the 
state  of  Vermont  developed  and  it  is  safe  to  assume  that  some  of  the  wonderful  genius 
for  construction  which  developed  in  Robert  as  he  grew  to  manhood  was  transmitted  from 
the  grandfather,  whose  struggles  tor  success  in  the  new  world  marked  him  as  little  less 
than  a  genius. 

Several  members  of  the  Inman  family  served  and  sacrificed  in  the  Revolutionary 
war  and  Robert's  father  yielded  his  life  for  his  country  in  the  battle  of  Shiloh,  April 
6-7,  1S62,  under  the  leadership  of  the  immortal  Lincoln  and  General  Grant. 

Leaving  Vermont  in  response  to  the  demand  for  elbow  room  the  Inman  family 
located  in  Ohio,  where  Robert  was  born.  When  the  boy  was  two  years  of  age  his  parents 
removed  to  Iowa,  settling  near  Marshalltown.  During  the  following  trying  years  the 
Civil  war  was  fought  and  among  the  first  men  to  enlist  at  Marshalltown  was  Asa 
Inman.  Throughout  the  early  part  of  the  war  the  struggle  of  the  family  was  extremely 
bitter  and  following  the  death  of  the  father  the  mother  carried  her  little  brood  back 
to  the  old  home  in  Ohio.  So  desperate  were  the  circumstances  of  the  family  that  Robert 
then  nine  years  of  age,  sought  and  secured  employment  as  a  towboy  on  the  old  Ohio 
canal  and  for  several  years  thus  aided  his  mother  in  her  struggle  for  the  necessaries  of 
life. 

The  courage  of  Robert  Inman  as  a  boy,  which  in  after  years  became  the  chief  factor 
in  his  success,  is  shown  in  the  fact  that  when  he  was  twelve  years  of  age,  in  the  com- 
pany of  strangers  he  left  the  scenes  of  his  childhood  to  seek  his  fortune  in  the  romantic 
country  toward  the  setting  sun.  Leaving  his  mother  with  the  assurance  that  he  would 
go  west  and  carve  success  from  the  unknown  stretches  of  desert  and  wilderness.  Robert 
set  out  for  the  Pacific  coast  with  an  emigrant  train  led  by  William  Davidson.  The 
courageous  party  started  May  21,  1865,  and  five  months  and  eleven  days  later  arrived  at 
Portland,  Oregon,  then  a  struggling  settlement  of  three  thousand  persons.  Here  it  was, 
and  with  winter  coming  on,  that  young  Robert  began  his  forty-five  years  of  struggle  and 
development  and  success  in  Oregon. 

An  era  of  railroad  construction  in  the  Willamette  valley  was  beginning  in  1865 
and  Robert  found  his  first  job  in  a  tie-cutting  camp.  Many  of  the  ties  which  were  used 
on  the  first  grade  of  the  West  Side  line  of  the  Oregon  &  California  Railroad  were  shaped 
by  the  deft  young  hands  of  the  lad  from  Ohio.  For  ten  years  Robert  labored  and 
studied  mechanics  as  best  he  could,  his  purpose  being  to  fit  himself  for  service  in  the 
great  lumbering  industry  which  his  foresight  visualized  for  Oregon  and  the  northwest. 
His  opportunity  came  in  1S75.  when  he  entered  the  employment  of  the  Willamette  steam 
sawmill  of  Portland.  He  soon  proved  his  worth  in  the  plant  and  became  head  of  the 
manufacturing  department.  Here  for  eight  years  he  struggled  to  build  up  the  business 
and  to  fit  himself  for  a  more  important  position  in  the  new  industry  which  was  be- 
ginning to  take  on  form  in  the  minds  of  men  with  vision. 

When  the  North  Pacific  Lumber  Company— the  pioneer  Portland  concern  of  con- 
sequence—was organized  it  was  natural  that  the  leading  spirit  in  the  enterprise  should 
be  R.  D.  Inman.  With  L.  Therkelsen.  N.  Versteeg  and  L.  W.  P.  Quimby,  Mr.  Inman 
joined  in  the  formation  of  the  company  and  in  the  development  of  the  first  export  lumber 
business  in  Portland.  He  planned  the  mill  and  was  superintendent  of  construction. 
For  seven  years  he  had  direction  of  the  manufacture  of  lumber,  during  which  time 
the  concern  developed  a  large  business,  both  local  and  export. 

Mr.  Inman  entered  his  real  life  work  in  1890,  when  with  .lohn  Poulsen  he  organized 


HISTORY  OP  OREGON  19 

the  Inman-Poulsen  Lumber  Company  and  erected  a  mill  on  the  Willamette  river.  The 
mill  was  the  wonder  of  the  time  among  manufacturers  because  of  the  speed  given  the 
machinery,  thus  greatly  increasing  the  output  of  the  plant  and  reducing  the  cost  of 
manufacture. 

During  November,  1896,  fire  destroyed  the  Inman-Poulsen  mill.  With  superhuman 
effort  the  owners  of  the  property  began  rebuilding  the  mill  before  all  the  lumber  piles 
had  been  reduced  to  embers  and  within  sixty  days  the  present  great  mill — one  of  the 
most  wonderful  plants  in  the  world — with  a  yearly  capacity  of  nearly  two  hundred 
million  feet,  was  ready  for  operation.  With  the  great  modern  mill  in  charge  of  Mr. 
Inman  the  company  struck  out  for  world-wide  business  and  today  the  products  of  the 
plant  find  market  wherever  men  use  wood  for  their  construction  needs. 

At  the  time  of  Mr.  Inman's  death  one  of  the  local  papers  said  editorially:  "Not 
many  boys  started  life  poorer  than  'Bob'  Inman  nor  with  gloomier  prospects.  When 
at  the  age  of  twelve  he  reached  Oregon  with  an  immigrant  train,  there  were  hundreds 
of  lads  who  had  a  better  start  and  after  he  reached  manhood  and  went  to  work  in  a 
sawmill  there  were  thousands  of  workmen  to  whom  opportunity  beckoned,  but  nearly 
all  of  them  turned  away.  'Bob'  Inman's  rise  from  millhand  to  captain  of  industry 
is  an  object  lesson  which  many  young  men  may  study  with  profit.  Inman  wasn't  a 
grasping  man.  Never  did  he  seek  to  grind  down  labor.  He  treated  his  employes  like 
men — as  he  would  wish  to  be  treated  if  he  were  working  for  an  employer.  He  was  a 
builder  of  industry  and  a  valuable  community  asset.  More  than  that,  he  took  part  in 
public  life  fearlessly  and  honestly  and  he  won  complete  public  confidence.  Always  he 
was  foursquare  with  the  world." 

While  Mr.  Inman's  whole  life  was  voluntarily  made  an  inseparable  part  of  the 
lumbering  industry  of  the  northwest,  he  always  was  interested  in  civic  matters  and 
kept  himself  in  close  touch  with  all  the  world  about  him.  He  believed  that  no  man 
could  live  to  himself  and  always  sought  the  counsel  and  companionship  of  his  fellows. 
For  many  years  he  was  an  active  member  of  the  democratic  party  and  was  a  life-long 
member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity.  Among  the  Shriners  of  the  country  and  in  the 
Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  he  was  well  known  and  popular.  He  was  a  life 
member  of  the  Multnomah  Athletic  Club,  a  member  of  the  Portland  Rowing  Club  and 
of  the  Oregon  Automobile  Club.  His  service  in  the  Concatenated  Hoo  Hoos  was  re- 
warded by  election  as  supreme  snark.  In  public  life  he  served  in  the  house  of  repre- 
sentatives in  1892,  being  the  only  democrat  so  honored  in  Multnomah  county  in  twenty 
years.  He  was  elected  to  the  state  senate  in  1900.  During  the  period  of  port  develop- 
ment a  few  years  ago  he  was  appointed  chairman  of  the  Port  of  Portland  Commission 
and  his  vision  and  wisdom  found  first  place  in  the  plans  for  permanent  port  construc- 
tion. 

On  the  2d  of  May,  1875,  Mr.  Inman  married  Miss  Frances  L.  Guild  and  to  the  union 
were  born  two  daughters:  Minnie  Myrtle  and  Ivy  Frances,  both  of  whom  reside  in 
Boston.  Mr.  Inman  maintained  a  palatial  home  in  Irvington,  where  for  years  he  met 
and  entertained  his  friends.  On  the  6th  of  October,  1912,  Mr.  Inman  married  Mrs.  Clara 
A.  Rickards.  Death  called  Mr.  Inman,  April  27,  1920,  following  an  operation  for 
mastoiditis,  resulting  from  an  attack  of  influenza.  In  the  prime  of  his  mental  and 
physical  vigor,  with  his  leadership  in  the  lumber  industry  beyond  question,  and  sur- 
rounded by  life-long  friends  who  had  given  him  the  test  of  character,  "Bob"  Inman 
answered  the  final  summons  as  he  had  met  every  trial  of  life,  with  his  face  to  the  foe, 
with  his  years  filled  with  achievement,  with  nothing  more  to  be  desired. 


FRANCIS  P.  LEACH. 


The  life  record  of  Francis  P.  Leach  spanned  the  years  between  the  5th  of  Decem- 
ber, 1847,  when  he  was  born  in  Hartford,  Connecticut,  and  December  IS,  1915,  when 
he  passed  away  in  Portland.  His  youth  was  spent  in  New  England  and  after  leaving 
his  native  state  he  made  his  way  to  Galesburg,  Illinois,  where  he  resided  for  some 
time  and  then  came  to  the  northwest  arriving  in  Portland,  Oregon,  in  1877.  He  started 
out  in  the  business  world  here  as  an  employe  of  the  Smith  &  Watson  Iron  Works  and 
later  established  the  Excelsior  Iron  Works  in  South  Portland.  In  time  the  business 
was  reorganized  under  the  name  of  Leach  Brothers  Iron  Works,  and  the  plant  estab- 
lished at  Portland,  Oregon,  where  they  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  sash  weights 
and    stoves.      The    business    steadily    developed,    bringing    a    substantial    profit    to    the 


20  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

owner,  and  Mr.  Leach  retired  about  three  years  before  his  death,  having  acquired  a 
comfortable  competence,  spending  his  remaining  days  in  the  enjoyment  of  the  com- 
fort and   luxury   which   his   former   toil  provided   for   him. 

In  1873  Mr.  Leach  was  married  to  Miss  Joanna  Douglas,  a  daughter  of  James  and 
Mary  Douglas,  who  were  natives  of  Ireland  and  came  to  America  in  an  early  day. 
Mrs.  Leach  was  the  eldest  daughter  and  by  her  marriage  became  the  mother  of  ten 
children  of  whom  nine  are  living,  Frank  having  passed  away.  The  others  are:  Joseph 
M.,  owner  of  J.  M.  Leach  Iron  Works;  James  Herbert,  who  was  a  soldier  in  the  Spanish 
American  war;  Edward  C. ;  Josephine  L.,  the  wife  of  C.  L.  McKenna:  Winfield  G.  and 
George  M..  now  owners  of  the  Leach  Brothers  Iron  Works  located  at  Seattle.  Wash- 
ington; Lottie,  the  wife  of  James  L.  Kibbee:   Florence  B.  and  Harriet  M.,  both  at  home. 

Mr.  Leach  was  identified  with  several  fraternal  organizations.  He  belonged  to  the 
Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen,  the  Neighbors  of  Woodcraft,  the  United  Artisans, 
the  Degree  of  Honor,  the  Yeomen  and  the  Homesteaders,  He  was  a  consistent  mem- 
ber of  the  Taylor  Street  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  and  his  political  allegiance  was 
given  to  the  republican  party.  For  several  years  he  served  as  justice  of  the  peace  and 
his  decisions  were  at  all  times  strictly  fair  and  impartial.  His  cooperation  could 
always   be   counted    upon    in    matters   of    progressive    citizenship. 


PAUL  CHAPMAN  BATES. 

Various  corporate  interests  have  felt  the  stimulus  of  the  enterprise,  carefully 
formulated  plans  and  initiative  of  Paul  Chapman  Bates,  who  has  indeed  been  a  dynamic 
force  in  the  business  circles  of  Portland  and  the  state.  While  primarily  he  is  president 
of  the  firm  of  McCargar,  Bates  &  Lively,  general  insurance  agents  of  Portland,  he  is 
also  identified  with  many  business  enterprises  which  constitute  most  important  features 
in  the  industrial,  commercial  and  financial  development  of  the  city.  With  him.  to 
plan  is  to  achieve.  Every  opportunity  is  to  him  a  call  to  action  and  he  never  turns 
back  from  a   purpose  undertaken   until  it  is  carried   forward   to  successful   completion. 

Mr.  Bates  was  born  in  Southampton,  Massachusetts,  April  16,  1874,  his  parents 
being  Daniel  W.  and  Martha  (Tyler)  Bates.  His  father  was  a  sergeant  in  the  Twenty- 
seventh  Massachusetts  Volunteer  Infantry  throughout  the  Civil  war  and  was  three 
times  wounded,  once  at  Cold  Harbor.  He  died  at  Westfield,  Massachusetts,  in  1917. 
after  having  devoted  many  years  to  the  brokerage  business  there.  His  wife  passed 
away  in  the  same  city  in  April,  1920. 

After  obtaining  a  public  school  education  in  Massachusetts,  completed  by  a  high 
school  course  at  Westfield,  Paul  C.  Bates  started  out  upon  his  business  career.  In 
fact  when  a  boy  of  but  thirteen  he  had  obtained  employment  in  a  whip  factory,  working 
at  odd  jobs  and  gradually  advancing  from  a  very  humble  position  to  that  of  assistant 
manager  through  the  period  from  1887  until  1892.  He  then  became  private  secretary  to 
the  cashier  and  assistant  treasurer  of  the  Connecticut  River  Railway  Company  at 
Springfield.  :Massachusetts,  where  he  remained  for  a  year,  during  which  period  the 
line  was  purchased  by  the  Boston  &  Maine  Railroad  Company,  and  in  that  connection 
Mr.  Bates  received  his  first  lesson  in  high  finance.  He  was  afterward  bookkeeper 
with  the  New  York.  New  Haven  &  Hartford  Railroad  Company  during  the  latter  part 
of  1893  and  also  in  the  same  year  taught  a  country  school  near  Florida.  Massachusetts. 
At  the  close  of  the  year  he  made  his  way  westward  to  Oregon  and  until  1895  occupied 
the  position  of  stenographer  and  bookkeeper  with  the  Lambert.  Sargent  Insurance 
Agency  of  Portland. 

Laudable  ambition  has  actuated  him  at  every  point  in  his  career  and  after  a 
period  of  two  years  in  employment  he  purchased  the  agency  and  organized  the  firm 
of  Paul  C.  Bates  but  sold  the  business  in  September,  1896.  He  was  then  made  traveling 
field  adjuster  and  agency  organizer  with  the  Pennsylvania  Fire  Insurance  Company 
of  Philadelphia,  his  territory  covering  Oregon.  Washington  and  Idaho.  Two  years  were 
spent  in  that  connection  and  he  was  subsequently  field  agent  in  the  same  territory 
for  the  Union  Fire  Insurance'  Company  and  for  the  Law  Union  &  Crown  of  London. 
England,  from  1898  until  1903.  In  the  latter  year  he  became  a  partner  in  the  firm 
of  McCargar  &  Bates  of  Portland,  which  maintained  an  existence  under  that  style 
until  1909,  when  they  were  joined  by  a  third  partner,  organizing  the  present  firm 
of  McCargar.  Bates  &  Lively.  While  developing  one  of  the  largest  insurance  agencies 
of  the  state  and   in  connection  handling  a  business  of  mammoth  proportions,  Mr.  Bates 


PAUL   C.    BATES 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  23 

has  also  become  a  prominent  figure  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  state,  chiefly  in  the  matter 
of  organizing  and  directing  large  corporate  interests.  Through  his  efforts  many  mil- 
lions of  capital  have  been  invested  in  Oregon  property.  He  successfully  engineered 
the  largest  timber  deal  ever  made  in  the  state,  which  involved  approximately  two 
billion  and  a  half  feet  of  timber  in  Clatsop,  Tillamook  and  Columbia  counties,  for 
a  consideration  of  four  million  dollars,  of  which  one  million  dollars  was  paid  in  cash 
by  David  C.  Eccles  of  the  Oregon-American  Lumber  Company.  Subsequently  the 
purchasers  invested  three  million  dollars  in  construction  of  a  railroad  from  the  Co- 
lumbia river  to  open  up  the  timber  as  an  operating  property.  The  land  area  involved 
was  twenty-seven  thousand  three  hundred  and  twenty-five  acres — a  district  twelve 
times  as  great  in  extent  as  the  state  of  Delaware.  Shortly  after  completing  this 
transaction  he  closed  the  sale  of  another  timber  tract  for  one  and  a  quarter  million 
dollars.  His  personal  investments  are  extensive,  making  him  a  stockholder  in  the 
St.  Helens  Creosoting  Company  of  St.  Helens,  Oregon,  the  W.  H.  Eccles  Lumber 
Company,  the  Oregon  ■  Portland  Cement  Company,  the  J.  R.  Hanify  Company  of  San 
Francisco,  owners  of  the  vessels  Ryder  Hanify  and  Ann  Hanify,  the  Hart-Wood  Lumber 
Company  of  San  Francisco,  operating  the  vessel  Quinault,  C.  R.  McCormick  &  Com- 
pany of  San  Francisco,  owners  of  the  vessels  City  of  Everett  and  City  of  St.  Helens, 
the  Broughton  &  Wiggins  Navigation  Company  of  Portland,  owners  of  the  ship  Ernest 
Myer,  the  Coast  Shipbuilding  Company  of  Portland,  owning  the  vessel  Egeria,  the 
Western  Marine  &  Mercantile  Corporation  of  San  Francisco,  owning  the  vessel  Charles 
Christenson,  the  Columbia  River  Packers  Association  of  Astoria.  Oregon,  and  the 
Hanover  Apartment  Company  of  Portland.  He  is  also  the  owner  of  a  farm  near 
Portland,  devoted  extensively  to  the  production  of  berries,  and  in  horticultural  interests 
finds  recreation  and  diversion  from  the  activities  which  center  in  the  corporate  inter- 
ests managed  and  in  the  direction  of  the  mammoth  insurance  business  built  up  by 
his  firm.  He  was  also  an  organizer  and  director  of  the  Hazelwood  Cream  Company  of 
Portland  and  assisted  in  the  organization  of  the  Hawley  Pulp  &  Paper  Company  of 
Oregon   City,  of  which   he  was  a  director. 

On  the  Sth  of  November.  1903.  Mr.  Bates  was  united  in  mnrriage  to  Miss  Agnete 
Poulsen,  a  daughter  of  Johan  Poulsen,  a  native  of  Denmark.  The  marriage  was  cele- 
brated in  Portlind  and  they  hTve  become  narents  of  two  sons:  Johan  Poulsen,  born 
in  1906;  and  Hamilton,  July  28.  1907.  The  religious  faith  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bates 
is  that  of  the  Congregational  church  and  his  political  endorsement  is  given  to  the 
republican  party.  He  is  a  life  member  of  the  Multnomah  Amateur  Athletic  Club 
and  belongs  to  the  Irvington,  the  Arlington  and  Waverly  Clubs.  Pishing,  hunting 
and  farming  constitute  the  sources  of  his  relaxation,  but  the  hours  given  thereto  are 
comparatively  few.  There  is  a  constant  call  of  some  business  interest  which  makes 
demand  upon  his  time  and  attention.  In  the  parlance  of  the  day,  he  is  a  live  wire. 
In  other  words,  he  is  forceful,  resourceful  and  resolute.  He  plans  well  and  gets 
results  and  that  his  plans  are  comprehensive  and  practical  is  shown  in  the  fact  that 
his  achievements  place  him  in  the  point  of  leadership  in  connection  with  many  and 
varied  interests.  Any  city  would  be  glad  to  welcome  him  to  the  ranks  of  its  business 
men.  His  energy,  can  be  spoken  of  only  in  the  superlative  degree,  and  yet  there  is 
not  a  single  esoteric  phase  in  his  life,  his  entire  course  being  marked  simply  by  a 
recognition  and  utilization  of  opportunities  which  many  others  have 
lessly  by. 


RAPHAEL  RAYMOND. 


Raphael  Raymond,  retired  wheat  man  and  rancher  of  Pendleton,  Umatilla  county. 
Oregon,  was  born  at  St.  Jobey,  near  Montreal.  Canada,  June  16,  1S56,  a  son  of  Gabriel 
and  Zora  (Treado)  Raymond,  both  natives  of  the  same  locality  and  here  also  their 
marriage  occurred.  Gabriel  Raymond  followed  farming  and  engaged  in  shipping  horses 
from  Canada  to  New  York.  His  death  occurred  in  1894,  at  the  age  of  eighty-five  years 
and  his  wife  survived  until  1906. 

The  boyhood  of  Raphael  Raymond  was  spent  in  Canada  until  he  was  sixteen  years 
of  age,  when  after  working  for  some  time  in  a  brickyard  in  New  York,  he  went  to 
Holyoke.  Massachusetts,  where  he  obtained  employment  at  the  city  waterworks.  He 
worked  in  a  tobacco  establishment  at  Hatfield,  Massachusetts,  until  he  returned  to  his 
home  in  Canada,  remaining  there  until  1873,  when  he  went  west,  locating  in  Nevada. 


24  HISTORY  OF  OREGOX 

He  engaged  in  mining  in  that  state  in  the  vicinity  of  Carson  City  and  at  other  points, 
including  Austin.  Subsequently  he  worked  in  the  mines  at  Belleville,  Nevada,  until 
1877,  when  he  came  to  Oregon,  arriving  in  Portland  on  the  25th  of  September.  He 
did  not  long  remain  there  but  went  to  Seattle  and  Tacoma,  Washington.  At  the  time 
of  his  arrival  in  Seattle  he  could  have  purchased  eighty  acres  of  land,  well  improved, 
for  the  sum  of  five  hundred  dollars.  Later  in  that  same  year  he  went  to  Pendleton 
by  way  of  stage  from  Umatilla  and  his  first  occupation  upon  arriving  there  was  in  the 
employ  of  Bill  Whitman,  a  well  known  farmer  of  that  vicinity.  He  next  worked  for 
Charles  McMorris  and  afterwards  in  connection  with  a  Dr.  Mansfield  and  Sam  Doble 
conducted  a  planing  mill  for  some  time.  Mr.  Raymond  and  Zeb  Lockwood  then  took 
a  preemption  claim  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  six  miles  from  Athena,  which 
they  operated  with  a  gratifying  amount  of  success  for  a  period  of  time  and  eventually 
Mr.  Raymond  sold  out  to  his  partner.  In  1878  he  worked  for  the  government  on  a 
pack  train  and  during  the  Indian  uprisings  in  Umatilla  county  assisted  in  driving  the 
Indians  into  the  Black  Hills.  He  was  also  employed  by  the  goveVnment  at  Boise,  Idaho, 
where  he  herded  mules.  Returning  to  Oregon  he  took  up  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres 
of  railroad  land,  which  he  homesteaded,  and  he  has  improved  and  added  to  his  original 
tract  until  he  now  owns  one  thousand  six  hundred  and  thirteen  acres.  He  resided  on 
this  land  until  1905,  when  he  bought  his  present  home,  which  is  one  of  the  finest  m 
Pendleton,  and  there  he  is  now  living  retired.  Mr.  Raymond  helped  put  through  the 
railroad  from  Wallowa  to  Ensworth,  Crab  creek  and  thence  to  Spokane,  Washington. 
For  four  years  he  was  road  supervisor  near  Helix,  Umatilla  county,  and  he  has  always 
taken  a  prominent  part  in  movements  for  the  general  good. 

In  1882  Mr.  Raymond  was  married  to  Miss  Addie  Marshall,  a  daughter  of  Thomas 
Marshall,  and  a  native  of  Kansas.  To  their  union  five  children  were  born:  Bessie, 
Jessie,  whose  death  occurred  in  1918  at  the  age  of  thirty-one  years;  Delena,  who  died 
at  the  age  of  eleven  months;  Josephine;   and  Raphael,  fourteen  years  of  age. 

Since  age  conferred  upon  Mr.  Raymond  the  right  of  franchise  he  has  been  a  stanch 
supporter  of  the  republican  party,  having  firm  belief  in  the  principles  of  that  party  as 
factors  in  good  government.  He  is  not  connected  with  a  large  number  of  fraternal 
organizations  but  holds  membership  in  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  He  is  a  highly  re- 
spected citizen  of  Pendleton,  where  he  is  known  as  a  self-made  man,  his  present  position 
of  prosperity  and  affluence  in  the  community  being  the  result  of  his  own  labor,  coupled 
with  the  energy  and  grim  determination  to  succeed. 


LOUIS  D.  COLE. 


Louis  D.  Cole,  who  left  the  impress  of  his  individuality  and  progressive  spirit  upon 
the  business  development  of  Oregon  and  upon  its  political  history,  passed  away  on  the 
27th  of  September,  1920,  when  he  had  reached  the  age  of  sixty-eight  years.  He  was 
born  in  Warren,  Ohio,  July  19,  1852,  and  there  attained  his  majority,  acquiring  his 
early  education  in  the  schools  of  his  native  city  and  afterward  became  a  student  in  a 
college.  He  likewise  spent  two  years  in  Europe,  where  further  study  and  broad  travel 
greatly  promoted  his  knowledge,  bringing  him  wide  understanding  of  the  world  and 
its  people. 

Upon  his  return  to  his  native  land  Mr.  Cole  went  to  Nevada,  where  for  some  time 
he  engaged  in  mining  and  merchandising.  He  afterwards  removed  to  San  Francisco, 
California,  where  he  became  manager  of  the  I  X  L  Clothing  Store  and  at  a  later  period 
he  came  to  Oregon,  where  he  took  up  his  abode  about  thirty-five  years  ago.  Here  he 
was  again  connected  with  the  clothing  trade  for  several  years  and  was  also  represen- 
tative of  a  large  eastern  carpet  company  for  a  number  of  years.  He  became  well 
known  through  his  business  connections,  and  his  enterprise,  thoroughness  and  close 
application  brought  to  him  a  success  that  enabled  him  to  leave  his  family  in  comfortable 
financial  circumstances. 

In  1882  Mr.  Cole  was  married  to  Miss  Hannah  Moultzen.  a  daughter  of  Claus  and 
Katherine  Moultzen,  who  were  natives  of  Denmark,  and  came  to  the  United  States 
about  1860,  settling  in  California,  where  they  spent  their  remaining  days.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Cole  were  the  parents  of  three  children:  Jacob  Sam.  a  resident  of  California; 
Julia  F.,  the  wife  of  T.  P.  McDevitt;  and  Moyer  Daniel  of  Portland.  Mr.  Cole  was 
devoted  to  the  welfare  of  his  family  and  his  death  also  brought  great  sorrow  to  many 
friends.     He   had    long   been    prominently   known,   not    only   by   reason    of   his   business 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  25 

activities  but  also  owing  to  the  part  whicli  he  took  in  promoting  republican  successes. 
He  served  as  a  member  of  the  city  council  in  1S9S  and  managed  the  first  Roosevelt 
campaign  in  Oregon  and  also  the  campaign  of  Frederick  W.  Mulkey  for  state  senator. 
He  stood  firmly  for  policies  which  he  espoused  and  his  business  was  ever  based  upon 
a  firm  belief  in  the  principles  which  he  advocated. 


MARTIN  WHITE. 


JIartin  White.  Judge  of  Columbia  county  since  1919,  was  born  in  Wisconsin  in  1S55. 
His  parents.  Benjamin  and  Mary  (Good)  White,  were  married  in  Wisconsin  and  in  1S66 
migrated  to  Kansas,  where  they  took  up  farming.  Benjamin  White  was  killed  by  the 
Indians  in  their  war  on  tlie  settlers  in  1868. 

Martin  White  served  in  the  militia  when  he  was  but  fourteen  years  of  age,  and 
after  thirteen  months  spent  in  Indian  warfare,  engaged  in  farm  work  until  18S0,  when 
he  returned  to  Wisconsin.  In  188S  he  pre-empted  eighty  acres  of  timber  land,  which 
he  sold  to  the  Benson  Lumber  Company.  He  then  established  a  dairy  farm  at  Beaver 
Creek,  where  he  operated  for  many  years.  As  a  result  of  his  interest  in  civic  affairs 
he  was  elected  to  the  ofl5ce  of  county  assessor,  being  re-elected  the  four  following 
terms,  and  owing  to  his  knowledge  of  the  duties  of  that  office  he  served  for  two  addi- 
tional years  as  deputy  assessor.  For  three  terms  he  held  the  office  of  sheriff  and  in 
1919  was  elected  county  judge,  in  which  capacity  he  still  serves.  Jlr.  White  was  a 
stockholder  in  the  First  National  Bank  of  St.  Helens  and  was  one  of  the  organizers  of 
the  Columbia  County  Bank,  in  which   institution  he   is  now  a  stockholder. 

Judge  White  is  a  good  roads  enthusiast  and  has  done  much  for  the  promotion  of 
good  roads  in  Columbia  county.  During  the  World  war  he  was  at  all  times  careful 
and  punctilious  in  the  duties  trusted  to  his  charge,  and  in  any  office  he  has  held  he 
has  shown  his  ability  to  handle  situations  efficiently,  regarding  himself  as  a  public 
servant  and  not  as  the  public's  boss. 

In  18S0  Judge  White  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Jane  Rose  Lillich,  a  native 
of  Wisconsin.  They  came  to  the  Pacific  coast  and  have  resided  in  Columbia  county 
since  1881. 

Judge  White's  fraternal  affiliations  are  limited  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  in  which 
order  he  has  held  all  the  offices  and  has  been  a  member  of  the  grand  lodge.  He  has 
always  been  a  republican,  but  his  friends  among  the  democrats  are  many.  In  fact, 
no  man  in  the  county  has  more  real  friends  than  Judge  White.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  White 
are  members  of  the  Methodist  church,  where  he  has  been  one  of  the  trustees  for  many 
years,  and  is  now  president  of  the  board.  While  in  no  sense  a  seeker  after  pub- 
licity, Judge  White  is  always  in  the  foreground  in  matters  of  public  interest  and  can 
be  counted  upon  to  advance  any  scheme  that  will  help  the  interest  of  his  town,  county 
and  state.  His  wide  acquaintance  and  splendid  standing  as  a  citizen  make  him  a 
valuable  asset  to  the  commonwealth. 


BENJAMIN  CLIFFORD   DEY. 

Benjamin  Clifford  Dey,  a  member  of  the  Portland  bar,  practicing  as  senior  partner 
in  the  firm  of  Dey,  Hampson  &  Nelson,  has  spent  his  entire  life  in  this  state,  having 
been  born  in  Oregon  City,  December  29,  1879.  His  father,  Thompson  Dey,  was  a  native 
of  Seneca  county.  New  York,  born  in  1832.  He  joined  the  Union  army  during  tlie  Civil 
war,  going  into  the  service  from  Wisconsin  with  the  Engineers  division.  He  was  mar- 
ried in  Wisconsin  to  Miss  Mary  Ellen  Lamphere  and  in  1874  they  removed  to  Oregon, 
settling  first  at  New  Era,  near  Oregon  City,  where  Mr.  Dey  established  a  flouring  mill. 
In  1878  he  took  up  his  abode  in  Oregon  City  and  there  resided  until  1888,  when  he 
went  to  Santa  Cruz,  California,  there  passing  away  June  17,  1892.  His  widow  sur- 
vived him  for  several  years,  her  death  occurring  November  9,  1909,  in  Oakland,  California. 

Benjamin  C.  Dey  obtained  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Oregon  City 
and  continued  his  studies  in  Santa  Cruz.  Following  his  father's  death  he  came  to 
Portland  and  completed  a  high  school  course  here.  He  then  again  went  to  California, 
becoming  a  student  at  Stanford  University,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1905  with 
the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.     In  June,  1906,  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  Oregon 


26  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

and  entered  upon  the  active  work  of  the  profession,  being  associated  tor  eleven  years 
with  W.  D.  Fenton.  In  1917  he  formed  a  partnership  with  Alfred  A.  Hampson  and  m 
1918  R.  C.  Nelson  was  admitted  to  the  firm,  the  style  of  Dey,  Hampson  &  Nelson  being 
then  assumed.  For  fourteen  years  Mr.  Dey  has  been  a  representative  of  the  Portland 
bar  and  although  advancement  in  the  profession  of  law  is  proverbially  slow,  no  dreary 
novitiate  awaited  him.  He  soon  gained  recognition  in  a  growing  practice  and  for  many 
years  his  clientage  has  been  extensive,  making  his  law  business  one  of  substantial  profit. 
He  has  also  become  general  attorney  in  Oregon  for  the  Southern   Pacific  Company. 

On  the  15th  of  November,  1911,  in  San  Francisco,  Mr.  Dey  was  married  to  Miss 
Hazel  Sobey,  a  daughter  of  Dr.  A.  L.  Sobey,  a  native  of  England.  Their  children  are 
three  in  number:  Dorothy,  Benjamin  C.  and  Franklin  H.  Mr.  Dey  is  a  republican  in 
his  political  views  and  in  the  club  circles  of  the  city  he  is  well  known,  representing 
the  Arlington,  University  and  Press  Clubs,  and  he  is  also  identified  with  the  Chamber 
of  Commerce.  In  a  word  he  is  associated  with  all  those  interests  which  are  of  vital 
significance  in  promoting  the  city's  growth  and  advancement  and  in  upholding  its  best 
interests. 


ROBERT  TILDEN  BOALS,  M.   D. 

It  is  the  industry  and  enterprise  of  the  citizen  that  enrich  and  ennoble  the  common- 
wealth and  from  individual  enterprise  has  sprung  all  the  splendor  and  importance  of 
this  great  west.  Among  those  who  have  achieved  prominence  as  men  of  marked  ability 
and  substantial  worth  is  Dr.  Robert  Tilden  Boals,  a  resident  of  Tillamook  City.  Like 
many  other  representative  citizens  of  Oregon,  Dr.  Boals  is  a  son  by  adoption,  for  his 
birth  occurred  in  Kansas  in  1S77.  His  parents  were  John  W.  and  Mary  (Kane)  Boals, 
the  former  a  native  of  Pennsylvania.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Boals  removed  from  Pennsylvania 
to  Kansas  at  an  early  day  and  when  their  son,  Robert  T.,  was  a  small  boy  came  to  Oregon, 
locating  in  Columbia  county  a  few  miles  from  the  town  of  Rainier.  There  the  father  en- 
gaged in  farming  and  won  prominence  as  one  of  the  representative  agriculturists  of 
the  vicinity. 

Robert  Tilden  Boals  received  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Columbia  county  and 
later  entered  the  State  Normal  School  at  Monmouth.  For  some  time  he  attended  the 
University  of  California  but  upon  deciding  to  devote  his  life  to  the  medical  profession, 
he  enrolled  as  student  in  the  medical  department  of  the  University  of  Oregon  and  re- 
ceived his  M.  D.  degree  in  1905.  The  following  year  he  served  as  house  physician  at 
St.  Vincent's  Hospital  and  at  the  termination  of  that  period  removed  to  San  Francisco 
just  prior  to  the  earthquake  of  1906.  He  lost  all  of  his  possessions  in  that  great  dis- 
aster and  soon  afterward  returned  to  Oregon,  taking  up  residence  in  Tillamook  City. 
Upon  his  arrival  there  he  opened  offices  for  the  practice  of  his  profession  and  during 
the  fifteen  years  of  his  residence  there  he  has  built  up  a  practice  of  importance  and 
magnitude.  The  professional  ability  of  Dr.  Boals  is  widely  known  and  recognized  and 
in  addition  to  his  private  practice  he  is  surgeon  of  the  Southern  Pacific  Railway  and 
for  such  large  corporations  as  the  Coats  Lumber  Company,  Tillamook  Lumber  Company, 
Yellow  Fir  Lumber  Company,  and  Whitney  Lumber  Company.  He  remains  a  deep 
student  of  his  profession  and  has  taken  postgraduate  courses  at  the  Post  Graduate 
Medical  School  of  New  York  in  1912,  and  the  Northwestern  University  at  Chicago  in 
1919.  While  for  the  most  part  Dr.  Boals  follows  general  practice  he  makes  a  specialty 
of  surgery  and  has  attained  high  rank  in  that  line.  He  has  not  only  won  prominence 
as  a  professional  man  but  as  a  citizen  he  was  so  actively  identified  with  every  move- 
ment for  the  development  of  the  general  welfare  that  in  1916  he  was  called  upon  to 
fill  the  office  of  mayor,  giving  to  the  city  a  businesslike  and  progressive  administration. 
It  was  during  his  incumbency  in  that  office  that  the  present  city  hall  was  erected  and 
the  steel  bridge  across  the  river  was  also  built.  He  undertook  the  concrete  paving 
of  the  city  streets  and  from  every  point  of  view  his  administration  stood  for  improve- 
ment and  advancement.  He  is  readily  acknowledged  by  all  as  the  best  chief  executive 
the  city  has  ever  had.  Tillamook  City  boasts  of  a  one  hundred  per  cent  fire  department 
and  gives  to  Dr.  Boals  entire  credit  for  its  organization.  The  department,  containing 
all  of  the  latest  fire  fighting  equipment,  is  one  of  the  best  in  the  state  outside  of  Port- 
land and  a  few  of  the  larger  cities. 

In  1907  Dr.  Boals  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Clara  Tohl,  of  Nehalem.  and  to 
them    two   sons   have   been   born:     Robert   E.,   Jr.,   and    Harlen   C,   both    attending   the 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  27 

Tillamook   public   schools.     Mrs.   Boals   is  prominent   in  the  social  and   club   circles   of 
the  city  and  is  a  woman  of  magnetic  personality. 

Fraternally  Dr.  Boals  is  identified  with  the  Masons,  being  past  master  of  his  lodge, 
and  he  is  also  a  Knight  of  Pythias.  He  has  furthered  the  interests  of  the  profession  in 
the  county  by  erecting  the  first  general  hospital,  which  he  still  owns  and  which  is  known 
as  the  Boals  Hospital.  The  prominence  he  has  gained  in  the  medical  profession  is 
indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  Tillamook  County  Medical  Society,  of  which  he 
is  president,  the  Oregon  State  Medical  Society,  and  the  American  X-Ray  Society,  and 
he  is  a  fellow  of  the  American  Medical  Association.  For  ten  years  he  served  the  com- 
munity as  county  health  officer.  During  the  World  war  and  while  he  was  serving  as 
mayor  he  was  a  member  of  the  draft  board  as  well  as  examining  physician.  Through- 
out the  community  Dr.  Boals  is  spoken  of  in  terms  of  admiration  and  respect,  and  a 
portion  of  his  success  may  be  attributed  to  his  untiring  energy  and  pleasing  personality. 
He  has  exerted  an  immeasurable  influence  on  the  city  of  his  residence  as  well  as  on 
his  profession,  and  Tillamook  City  is  indeed  fortunate  in  having  him  for  a  citizen. 


COOK  GARVEN  NICHOL. 


Cook  Garven  Nichol,  a  most  enterprising  and  progressive  merchant,  located  at 
Mosier,  was  born  in  Missouri  in  1869.  His  father  was  a  native  of  Texas  county,  Mis- 
souri, whither  his  parents  had  removed  in  pioneer  times.  They  had  previously  been 
early  residents  of  Kentucky  and  also  became  identified  with  the  pioneer  development 
of  Missouri.  The  mother  of  Cook  G.  Nichol  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Reuh  Mitchell  and 
came  of  one  of  the  old  families  of  Tennessee,  in  which  state  her  ancestors  had  settled 
in  1S04. 

Cook  G.  Nichol  acquired  a  limited  education  in  the  rural  schools  of  Texas  county 
and  at  the  age  of  seventeen  years  started  out  to  make  his  fortune.  He  was  empty- 
handed  but  worked  his  way  to  New  Mexico  and  after  many  trying  experiences  reached 
Silver  City.  His  early  years  were  fraught  with  earnest  toil  and  endeavor.  Locating 
at  Pinos  Altos  he  there  engaged  in  mining  and  through  the  succeeding  eight  years  of 
his  life  followed  mining  in  New  Mexico,  Arizona,  Montana  and  Idaho.  Having  saved 
about  thirty-five  hundred  dollars,  he  then  went  to  Houstonia,  Missouri,  and  purchased 
a  lumberyard.  For  five  years  he  conducted  business  at  that  place,  during  which  time 
he  doubled  his  capital;  but  on  account  of  the  health  of  his  eldest  son  he  removed  to 
Montana,  buying  a  ranch  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  and  turned  his  attention  to 
cattle  raising.  After  eight  years'  hard  work  his  ranch  was  greatly  devastated  by  a 
flood,  causing  him  the  loss  of  one  hundred  and  seventy-five  tons  of  hay  and  three  hundred 
head  of  cattle.  He  then  sold  his  property  at  half  price  and  started  with  his  family  for 
the  Pacific  coast.  After  looking  around  for  an  opening  he  decided  upon  Mosier,  Wasco 
county,  and  in  1911  purchased  a  half  interest  in  the  general  merchandise  store  which 
he  now  conducts.  After  a  brief  period  he  became  sole  owner  by  acquiring  the  interest 
of  his  partner.  Not  having  the  necessary  capital  with  which  to  buy  the  half  interest 
he  called  upon  a  banker  at  Hood  river  and  stated  his  needs.  After  a  conversation 
concerning  his  chances  of  success  alone  in  the  business  the  banker  produced  a  letter 
from  a  bank  at  Houstonia,  Missouri,  which  had  been  written  to  a  bank  at  Lewistown, 
Montana,  assuring  that  institution  that  Mr.  Nichol  was  in  every  way  worthy  of  accommo- 
dation. Upon  the  margin  of  the  letter  the  bank  at  Lewistown  had  written:  "We  take 
pleasure  in  confirming  the  contents  of  this  letter."  Accordingly  credit  was  advanced 
Mr.  Nichol  and  he  purchased  his  partner's  interest  in  the  store,  which  he  has  since 
successfully  conducted.  In  the  intervening  period  of  nine  years  he  has  built  up  an 
exceptionally  good  credit,  a  large  trade  and  a  well  earned  reputation.  Mr.  Nichol 
and  his  store  are  alike  a  credit  to  the  town. 

In  1896  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Nichol  and  Miss  Belle  Holly  of  Licking, 
Missouri,  who  belonged  to  an  old  New  England  family,  the  ancestral  line  being  traced 
back  to  the  family  to  which  belonged  Miles  Standish.  The  Holly  family  were  pioneers 
of  New  York  before  settling  in  Missouri.  The  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Nichol  remembers 
Chicago  as  a  small  village  which  he  passed  through,  driving  an  ox  team,  when  traveling 
to  northern  Illinois.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Nichol  are  the  parents  of  two  sons  and  a  daughter: 
Bernard  Eugene  was  educated  in  the  graded  schools  of  Mosier  and  at  the  Behnke- 
Walker  Business  College  of  Portland,  Oregon.  He  obtained  employment  at  the  plant 
of  Armour  &  Company  in  Portland  as  a  bookkeeper  and  within  a  short  time  was  sent 


28  insTOHV  OF  OREGOX 

to  Butte.  Montana,  and  is  now  branch  manager  for  the  company  at  Billings,  that  state. 
This  rise  in  the  business  world  was  accomplished  in  less  than  three  years  of  service; 
Robert  Leo  is  a  graduate  in  the  Mosier  high  school;  Mildred  is  a  student  in  the  grades. 
The  family  is  widely  and  favorably  known  and  the  hospitality  of  the  best  homes  of 
this  section  of  the  state  Is  freely  accorded  them.  Mr.  Nichol  was  very  active  in  all 
the  drives  having  to  do  with  the  World  war  and  served  on  the  committee  that  put 
Mosier  over  the  top  in  the  first  bond  drives,  winning  for  the  town  the  honor  banner 
ahead  of  the  entire  twelfth  district,  which  embraced  California,  Oregon  and  Washing- 
ton. Every  public  enterprise  in  his  section  expects  and  receives  his  aid  in  time  and 
money  and  on  no  occasion  has  be  been  found  a  slacker.  Fraternally  he  is  an  Odd 
Fellow  and  a  Modern  Woodman.  He  has  never  held  public  office  in  Oregon,  despite 
many  requests  of  his  fellow  townsmen  that  he  accept  nominations.  He  says  he  is  a 
business  man  and  knows  nothing  about  politics  nor  has  he  any  disposition  to  take  up 
a  new  line.  He  is  the  owner  of  an  extensive  ranch  in  Deschutes  county,  where  he  is 
breeding  and  feeding  selected  cattle.  This  he  manages  in  addition  to  his  commercial 
pursuits,  which  for  a  number  of  years  have  classed  him  with  the  leading  representatives 
of  mercantile  interests  in  Wasco  county.  Those  who  know  him — and  he  has  a  wide 
acquaintance — speak  of  him  in  terms  of  high  regard  and  recognize  in  him  a  forceful 
and  resourceful  man  whose  well  defined  plans  tor  his  own  advancement  and  for  the 
general  good  are  carried  forward  to  successful  completion. 


HON.  THOMAS  E.  CAUTHORN. 

Benton  county  long  regarded  Hon.  Thomas  E,  Cauthorn  as  one  of  its  most  dis- 
tinguished and  valued  citizens.  He  had  a  wide  acquaintance  and  all  who  knew  him 
recognized  the  worth  of  his  character  and  the  value  of  his  contribution  to  the  public 
good.  While  almost  three  decades  have  been  added  to  the  cycle  of  the  century  since 
he  passed  away  he  is  yet  well  remembered  by  those  who  were  his  associates  and  his 
admirers  through  his  active  and  well  spent  life.  He  was  born  in  Mexico,  Missouri, 
August  31,  1849,  and  died  July  5,  1891.  He  became  a  pioneer  of  the  northwest,  accom- 
panying his  father  and  the  family  to  this  section  of  the  country  when  a  youth  of 
sixteen  years.  They  arrived  in  1865  and  came  direct  to  Corvallis,  Oregon.  In  the 
year  1876  Thomas  E.  Cauthorn  formed  a  partnership  with  his  father  which  continued 
without  interruption  until  1889,  when  they  sold  out.  They  had  conducted  a  general  mer- 
chandise store  at  Corvallis,  concentrated  their  efforts  and  attention  upon  the  further 
development  of  the  store  and  built  up  a  trade  of  very  substantial  proportions,  con- 
ducting this  enterprise  until  a  few  months  prior  to  the  death  of  Hon.  Thomas  E. 
Cauthorn. 

In  1870  Mr.  Cauthorn  was  united  In  marriage  to  Miss  Sarah  Jeffreys  and  they 
became  the  parents  of  three  daughters:  Mary;  Gertrude,  now  Mrs.  Fred  Buchanan; 
and  Frankie,  now  Mrs.  Archie  C.  Mclntyre. 

Mr.  Cauthorn  was  ever  a  devoted  husband  and  father  and  found  his  greatest 
happiness  in  promoting  the  welfare  and  comfort  of  his  wife  and  children  and  he  had 
the  greatest  reverence  for  his  parents.  He  also  figured  prominently  in  connection 
with  the  public  affairs  of  the  state  and  made  valuable  contributions  to  Oregon's  progress 
and  advancement.  In  1882  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  state  senate  and  so  cap- 
ably served  his  district  and  the  commonwealth  at  large  that  in  1886  he  was  reelected 
remaining  a  member  of  the  upper  house  of  the  Oregon  assembly  altogether  eight  years 
He  was  a  stalwart  champion  of  the  cause  of  education  and  served  as  a  member  on 
the  committee  of  education  while  in  the  senate  and  was  the  recognized  leader  in  legis- 
lative measures  that  pertained  to  the  development  of  the  school  system  of  the  state 
His  greatest  work  was  done  perhaps  in  his  connection  with  the  agricultural  college. 
In  1886  when  the  Conference  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  South,  surrendered 
control  of  the  college  to  the  state,  he  secured  the  location  of  the  school  in  Benton 
county,  the  bill  passing  both  houses.  He  then  began  the  work  which  will  ever  leave 
his  name  with  the  upbuilding  of  this  great  institution.  He  became  treasurer  of  the 
board  of  regents  and  chairman  of  the  executive  committee  and  in  every  possible  way 
contributed  to  the  upbuilding  of  the  college  from  its  earliest  organization  as  a  state 
school  until  it  became  one  of  the  strong  agricultural  colleges  of  the  northwest.  It 
was  he  who  a  few  months  before  his  death  went  before  the  legislature  and  made  a 
speech  for  an  appropriation  to  build  a  hall  for  the  boys  and  got  twenty-five  thousand 
dollars.     This    hall    was    built    and    named    Cauthorn    Hall    in    honor    of    him.     It    is    a 


HON.   THOMAS   E.    CAUTHORX 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  31 

recognized  fact  that  no  man  has  done  more  in  this  field  to  upbuild  this  institution 
and  the  value  of  his  service  is  immeasurable.  Mr.  Cauthorn  was,  nevertheless,  a  home 
man,  finding  his  greatest  happiness  at  his  own  fireside.  However,  he  was  of  most 
generous  spirit  and  among  the  poor  and  needy  are  many  who  had  reason  to  call  him 
friend.  He  never  sought  the  reward  of  public  acknowledgment  of  his  kindness  but 
gave  his  benefactions  quietly  and  unostentatiously.  When  he  passed  away  one  of  the 
local  papers  said  of  him:  "A  respected  citizen  has  gone  from  earth  and  his  spirit 
has  crossed  the  deep  river  to  receive  the  highest  reward  of  his  Maker.  How  proud 
must  a  man  be  when  death  is  approaching  to  know  that  he  has  done  his  duty  toward 
his  parents,  his  family,  his  friends  and  the  public.  Such  was  the  life  of  this  departed 
son  and  in  his  death  not  only  Benton  county  but  the  whole  state  has  lost  a  most 
useful  citizen.  Though  but  a  young  man  he  has  accomplished  many  things  of  both 
public  and  private  importance  and  it  will  be  hard  to  fill  the  place  of  this  active  and 
honored  man."  He  was  laid  to  rest  under  the  auspices  of  the  Masonic  fraternity, 
having  been  a  member  of  Corvallis  Lodge,  No.  14,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.  at  Corvallis.  He  al- 
ways most  faithfully  adhered  to  the  teachings  of  the  fraternity  concerning  the  brother- 
hood of  man  and  the  obligations  thereby  imposed  and  such  were  his  sterling  traits 
of  character  as  exemplified  in  private  and  public  life  and  his  memory  is  enshrined 
in  the  hearts  of  all  who  knew  him. 


ARTHUR  J.  KINGSLEY. 


It  has  often  been  said  that  death  loves  a  shining  mark  and  the  truth  of  this  saying 
was  never  more  evident  than  when  Arthur  J.  Kingsley  of  Portland  passed  away.  He 
had  long  been  a  most  prominent  figure  in  the  city  because  of  his  activity  in  manu- 
facturing circles  and  his  devotion  to  all  civic  interests.  Many  tangible  evidences  of 
his  creative  power  for  the  city's  benefit  and  upbuilding  can  be  cited  and  at  the  time 
of  his  death  he  was  active  in  directing  the  Manufacturers'  and  Land  Products  Show  and 
was  chairman  of  the  manufacturers'  bureau  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  He  gave 
his  life  for  the  spirit  of  progress  and  advancement  just  as  truly  as  the  soldiers  who 
died  on  the  battle  fields  of  .France,  for  he  worked  for  the  upbuilding  of  Oregon  when 
he  knew  that  his  health  demanded  absolute  rest  and  quiet.  The  story  of  his  life  con- 
tains much  of  inspirational  value.  He  was  born  at  Kingsley,  Michigan,  February  25, 
1874,  a  son  of  Judson  W.  and  Esther  (Warren)  Kingsley,  the  former  a  native  of  Wis- 
consin and  the  latter  of  New  York.  He  spent  his  early  life  in  his  native  state,  where 
he  acquired  a  common  school  education  and  when  yet  a  lad  in  years  he  began  provid- 
ing for  his  own  support  as  an  employe  of  the  Flint  &  Pere  Marquette  Railroad.  He 
spent  a  few  years  in  that  connection  and  then  became  an  employe  of  the  Grand  Ledge 
Chair  Company,  with  which  he  remained  for  a  period  of  eight  years.  At  length,  having 
acquired  comprehensive  knowledge  of  every  phase  of  the  business  he  determind  to  start 
out  independently  and  leaving  Michigan  in  the  summer  of  1906  he  came  to  Portland, 
where  he  organized  the  Oregon  Chair  Company.  He  was  the  pioneer  in  this  field  and 
up  to  this  time  all  trade  of  the  kind  had  been  conducted  with  eastern  firms,  so  that 
Mr.  Kingsley  had  to  overcome  custom  and  prejudice  in  establishing  his  business.  He 
persevered,  however,  and  his  industry,  determination,  fair  and  honorable  methods 
and  his  progressiveness  at  length  brought  their  reward,  and  today  the  business  of  the 
Oregon  Chair  Company  stands  as  a  monument  to  the  energy  and  ability  of  Mr.  Kingsley. 
The  business  was  begun  with  but  thirty-five  employes  and  ere  his  death  this  number 
had  been  increased  to  one  hundred  and  fifteen.  Forced  to  create  its  own  market  and 
compete  with  big  eastern  manufacturers,  the  concern  that  he  founded  nevertheless  won 
recognition  in  the  industrial  world  and  became  one  of  the  leading  enterprises  of  the 
kind  in  the  west.  In  fact  the  plant  is  the  only  one  turning  out  high  grade  chairs  and 
is  the  largest  enterprise  of  this  character  on  the  Pacific  coast.  Mr.  Kingsley  was  dis- 
couraged in  his  attempt  by  the  leading  business  men  of  Portland,  yet  notwithstanding 
this  he  made  a  wonderful  success  of  the  business.  He  found  it  necessary  to  ship  much 
of  the  hardwood  timber  which  he  used  from  Japan.  While  he  was  still  with  the 
Michigan  furniture  house  he  predicted  that  the  Michigan  manufacturers  would  eventually 
have  to  come  to  the  west  coast  io  manufacture  furniture  and  he  became  a  pioneer  in 
this  movement,  which  he  saw  ultimately  must  be  brought  about.  The  business  was  cap- 
italized for  seventy-five  thousand  dollars  and  after  the  first  few  months  of  discourage- 
ment it  became  a  growing  venture  which  steadily  developed   until  its  ramifying  trade 


32  HISTORY  OF  OREGOX 

interests  reached  over  a  great  section  of  the  western  territory  and  Portland  has  long 
been  most  proud  of  the  enterprise  which  he  built  up  and  which  became  one  of  the  most 
important  productive  industries  of  the  city. 

In  1S97  Mr.  Kingsley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Daisy  M.  Anderson,  a  daughter 
of  H.  N.  and  Sarah  (Conusman)  Anderson,  who  were  natives  of  Pennsylvania.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Kingsley  had  one  daughter,  Frances  A.,  who  is  at  home  with  her  mother. 
Fraternally,  Mr.  Kingsley  was  connected  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  In  his  political 
views  he  maintained  a  liberal  course,  supporting  men  and  measures  rather  than  party, 
yet  he  was  a  close  student  of  the  vital  questions  and  issues  of  the  day  and  no  man 
more  fully  recognized  or  met  the  duties  and  obligations  of  citizenship.  He  was  promi- 
nent in  all  movements  to  promote  the  civic  welfare  of  Portland  and  before  the  present 
Chamber  of  Commerce  was  formed  he  served  as  the  president  of  the  Oregon  Manu- 
facturers' Association,  which  was  merged  with  the  new  Chamber  in  the  spring  of  1915. 
He  was  a  most  earnest  worker  in  the  campaign  to  organize  the  new  Chamber  and  when 
this  was  successfully  accomplished  he  was  elected  chairman  of  the  industries  and  manu- 
facturers bureau.  On  account  of  his  unselfish  devotion  to  the  Oregon  manufacturing 
industry  and  his  firm  belief  in  the  future  progress  of  the  state,  he  was  naturally  selected 
as  the  president  of  the  Manufacturers'  and  Land  Products  Show,  which  he  developed  to 
a  point  of  notable  success  and  which  opened  in  the  week  preceding  his  death.  After  the 
work  in  connection  with  the  exposition  was  begun  he  gave  almost  his  entire  time  to 
its  affairs  and  that  it  might  be  conducted  at  a  minimum  cost  he  performed  personally 
much  of  the  work  that  otherwise  might  have  been  done  by  subordinates.  When  the 
fair  opened  there  were  two  hundred  different  manufactories  of  the  state  and  twenty- 
three  counties  represented  in  a  fine  exhibit  of  land  and  industrial  products.  His  last 
public  utterance  was  made  in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  Bulletin,  in  which  he  sent  out 
the  following  message:  "The  unprecedented  success  of  the  second  annual  Manufac- 
turers' and  Land  Products  Show  has  been  made  possible  by  your  splendid  cooperation. 
You  have  realized  how  vitally  important  is  a  proper  presentation  of  the  products  of 
our  fields  and  farms,  our  forests  and  streams  and  of  our  factories  and  stores.  Realizing 
this  you  have  neglected  your  own  individual  interests  to  put  your  shoulders  to  the 
wheel  for  the  common  good.  Our  big  ranchers,  our  most  successful  farmers,  men  at 
the  head  of  big  industries  and  corporations,  artists  and  publications,  together  with  their 
assistants  and  staffs,  have  neglected  their  own  private  interests  to  give  cheerfully  of 
their  time  and  services,  at  my  request,  to  make  this  the  unqualified  success  it  has 
proven.  I  wish  that  it  were  possible  to  grasp  each  one  of  you  by  the  hand  and  person- 
ally to  thank  you  from  the  bottom  of  my  heart  for  this  splendid  cooperation.  But  this 
is  physically  impossible,  because  thousands  have  helped,  and  without  your  help  the 
efforts  of  the  men  who  have  devoted  weeks  of  hard  work  would  have  been  without  avail. 
Accept  this  message  as  my  personal  thanks  to  you.  If  you  have  not  yet  seen  the 
exhibits,  be  sure  to  do  so.  It  is  your  show,  given  for  and  by  the  people  of  this  great 
empije  of  the  Pacific  northwest,  for  the  purpose  of  bringing  the  producers  and  con- 
sumers closer  together,  to  arrive  at  a  better  understanding,  to  provide  more  comforts 
at  less  cost,  and  I  know  that  after  this  show  has  become  history  these  objects  will 
have  reached  a  greater  and  more  comprehensive  realization.  Believe  me,  I  thank  you 
for  your  help  and  cooperation." 

When  he  passed  on,  November  2,  1915.  the  president  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce 
said:  "He  was  one  of  our  most  valuable  members  and  we  shall  feel  his  loss  keenly. 
We  all  loved  him  very  dearly.  His  untiring  efforts  have  accomplished  much  for  the 
betterment  of  civic  and  business  conditions  in  Portland."  The  Chamber  of  Commerce 
as  an   organization   passed   the  following  resolutions: 

"Whereas,  the  sudden  death  of  Arthur  J.  Kingsley  comes  as  a  shock  to  the  members 
of  the  Portland  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and 

"Whereas,  tlie  loyalty  and  devotion  of  Arthur  J.  Kingsley  to  the  work  of  the  Cham- 
ber has  endeared  him  to  us  all.  and 

"Whereas,  the  state  of  Oregon  and  the  city  of  Portland  have  suffered  an  irreparable 
loss  in  the  passing  of  one  whose  life  was  largely  dedicated  to  a  broad  development  of 
the  resources  of  our  state:    therefore  be  it 

"Resolved.  That  the  directors  of  the  Portland  Chamber  of  Commerce  have  heard 
with  deep  sorrow  of  the  death  of  their  esteemed  co-director,  Arthur  J.  Kingsley,  and 
be  it 

"Resolved,  That  the  board  of  directors  of  the  Portland  Chamber  of  Commerce  attend 
the  funeral  of  the  deceased,  and  be  it 

"Resolved,   That    the   business   of   the   Chamber   of   Commerce   be   suspended    during 


HISTORY  OF  ORP]G()X  33 

the  funeral  of  the  deceased,  and  likewise  the  Manufacturers'  and  Land  Products  Show, 
as  a  tribute  to  the  memory  of  Arthur  J.  Kingsley,  its  president,  and  be  it 

"Resolved,  That  the  secretary  of  the  Chamber  communicate  these  resolutions  to  the 
members  of  the  Chamber  at  large,  and  that  an  engrossed  copy  thereof  be  sent  to  the 
family  of  the  deceased  with  our  heartfelt  sympathies  in  this,  their  deep  hour  of  be- 
reavement, and  be  it 

"Resolved,  That  as  a  further  mark  of  respect  to  our  deceased  board  member,  we  do 
now  adjourn." 

Mr.  Kingsley  was  fond  of  motoring  and  found  great  happiness  when  with  his  family 
and  took  long  automobile  trips  through  the  beautiful  scenic  districts  of  the  west.  He  was 
a  dynamic  force  in  business  and  his  labors  were  ever  a  resultant  factor  in  the  advance- 
ment of  public  good:  but  the  best  traits  of  his  character  were  reserved  for  his  own 
home  and  fireside  and  he  counted  no  personal  effort  nor  sacrifice  on  his  part  too  great 
if  it  would  promote  the  welfare  and  happiness  of  his  fa'mily. 


C.   W.  CORNELIUS,   .M.   D. 

Dr.  C.  W.  Cornelius,  a  native  son  of  Oregon,  was  tor  many  years  engaged  in  the 
practice  of  medicine  and  surgery  in  Portland,  gaining  a  position  of  distinction  in  the 
ranks  of  his  profession.  He  was  born  October  1,3,  1S56,  on  his  parents'  donation  land 
claim  in  Washington  county,  on  what  is  known  as  the  Cornelius  Plains.  He  is  a  grand- 
son of  Benjamin  Cornelius,  formerly  of  Jasper  county,  Missouri,  who  left  Independence, 
that  state,  joining  a  train  of  two  hundred  and  fifty  persons,  organized  under  the  cap- 
taincy of  Lawrence  Hall,  thirty  wagons  being  used  to  convey  the  party.  The  grand- 
father was  accompanied  by  his  wife  and  ten  children,  and  leaving  Independence  on  the 
2d  of  April,  1845,  they  proceeded  to  Fort  Hall,  Idaho.  Before  reaching  Fort  Boise 
they  fell  in  with  Captain  Totheroe's  company  of  thirty-six  wagons  and  journeyed  on 
to  Malheur,  where,  following  the  advice  of  Stephen  Meek,  who  had  devoted  his  time 
to  trapping  between  the  Rocky  mountains  and  the  Pacific  ocean,  they  departed  from 
the  regular  course,  going  by  the  route  which  has  since  become  known  in  history  as 
Meek's  cut-off.  The  trapper  declared  the  route  to  be  much  shorter  and  also  assured 
them  that  it  led  through  a  beautiful  country,  where  grass  and  fresh  water  were  plenti- 
ful. He  seemed  so  familiar  with  the  route  that  a  portion  of  the  number  determined 
to  follow  him,  thinking  to  shorten  the  journey.  Among  these  were  the  Cornelius  and 
McKinney  families.  They  struck  off  south  of  the  Blue  mountains,  expecting  soon  to 
reach  The  Dalles.  It  was  not  long,  however,  before  it  became  apparent  that  the  leader 
knew  nothing  of  the  country.  Nevertheless  they  pressed  on  but  within  a  fortnight 
they  found  themselves  in  a  dry  and  barren  region.  Their  supplies  were  fast  becoming 
exhausted  and  sickness  now  broke  out  among  the  number,  carrying  off  many  of  the 
party.  After  a  while  they  had  a  funeral  at  every  camp,  and  then  over  the  newly  made 
graves  campfires  were  built,  and  later  the  wagons  and  teams  were  driven  over  them 
so  that  the  Indians  might  not  know  the  resting-place  of  their  dead.  Their  cattle  had 
to  be  sacrificed  for  food,  but  at  length  through  an  advance  party  relief  was  brought  to 
them  from  The  Dalles.  Eventually  they  reached  the  head  of  navigation  of  the  Columbia 
river,  but  death  had  marked  their  route  all  along  the  way.  From  that  point  they 
proceeded  to  the  'Willamette  valley  and  the  Cornelius  family  settled  on  what  subse- 
quently became  known  as  the  Cornelius  Plains  in  Washington  county.  There  were 
ten  children  in  the  family,  several  of  whom  had  already  reached  adult  age,  and  all 
preempted  land.  Thus  the  Cornelius  family  became  owners  of  a  very  extensive  tract 
in  that  vicinity. 

The  family  included  Benjamin  Cornelius,  Jr.,  father  of  Dr.  Cornelius,  who  was  a 
youth  of  fourteen  when  they  reached  Oregon.  In  1845  he  became  a  victim  of  the  gold 
fever,  so  prevalent  at  that  time,  and  ran  away  to  California,  but  after  a  year's  absence 
returned  to  his  old  home.  In  1851  he  married  Rachel  McKinney,  whose  ancestors  were 
of  Revolutionary  fame  and  who  with  her  parents,  William  and  Anna  JIcKinney,  had 
also  accompanied  the  Meek  contingency  on  the  way  to  Oregon  in  1845.  The  young 
couple  began  their  domestic  life  on  a  farm  adjoining  the  old  homestead.  In  1855  Mr. 
Cornelius,  with  a  company  of  volunteers  under  command  of  Colonel  T.  R.  Cornelius, 
his  brother,  participated  in  the  Indian  wars  of  1S55  and  1856.  In  1870  Benjamin  Cor- 
nelius, Jr.,  removed  with  his  family  to  Forest  Grove  for  the  purpose  of  educating  the 
children.     There   Mr.   Cornelius   engaged    in    loaning   money   and    in   speculating,   up   to 


34  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

the  time  of  his  death,  which  occurred  in  18S0,  while  his  wife  passed  away  February 
22,  1918. 

Dr.  Cornelius,  the  second  of  the  family,  supplemented  his  early  school  training  by 
an  academic  course  in  Pacific  University.  In  1877  he  began  the  study  of  medicine  with 
Dr.  F.  A.  Bailey  in  Hillsboro,  but  in  1879  he  removed  to  Spokane,  Washington,  where 
he  erected  a  drug  store — the  third  business  house  in  that  embryo  city — and  there 
engaged  in  the  drug  business  for  eighteen  months.  He  then  sold  out  and  returned  to 
Portland,  once  more  taking  up  his  medical  studies.  Entering  Willamette  University, 
he  there  remained  for  two  terms  as  a  medical  student,  after  which  he  purchased  a 
well  established  drug  business,  which  he  conducted  until  1885,  when  he  sold  out  and 
removed  to  San  Francisco,  California.  He  was  for  two  years  lessee  and  manager  of 
one  of  the  leading  theaters  of  that  city,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he  disposed  of  his 
interests  there  to  engage  in  mining  in  southern  Oregon.  Not  meeting  with  success  in 
that  venture  he  returned  to  Portland  and  entered  the  medical  department  of  the  Oregon 
State  University,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1889.  Soon  afterward  he  formed  a 
partnership  with  Dr.  H.  R.  Littlefield  and  began  active  practice  in  Portland.  In  1S94 
Dr.  Cornelius  was  elected  coroner  of  Multnomah  county  on  the  republican  ticket  by  an 
overwhelming  majority  and  served  in  that  capacity  most  acceptably  for  two  years.  He 
went  to  Alaska  in  1898,  at  the  time  of  the  first  gold  excitement  in  that  country,  arriving 
in  Skagway  just  as  the  epidemic  of  spinal  meningitis  broke  out,  and  so  successfully 
did  he  handle  the  disease  that  the  constant  demand  for  his  services  resulted  in  the 
breaking  down  of  his  health,  and  he  was  glad  to  return  to  Portland.  He  was  identified 
in  Skagway  with  the  famous  murder  case  of  Soapy  Smith,  being  the  physician  in  charge 
of  Smith's  autopsy  at  the  inquest,  and  he  also  attended  Frank  Read,  the  sheriff  shot  by 
Smith,  up  to  the  time  of  his  death. 

Since  retiring  from  practice  Dr.  Cornelius  has  devoted  much  time  to  real  estate  oper- 
ations and  investments.  In  1906  and  1907  he  erected  the  Cornelius  hotel,  which  was 
opened  May  1,  1907,  and  this  he  has  since  conducted.  It  is  one  of  the  leading  hostelries 
of  the  city,  containing  one  hundred  rooms,  and  is  patronized  at  all  times  to  its  full 
capacity.  Dr.  Cornelius  is  the  owner  of  much  valuable  property  here.  He  has  a  beau- 
tiful farm  at  Troutdale,  where  he  spends  most  of  his  time.  In  fact  the  overseeing  of 
this  farm  is  his  only  occupation  at  present.  He  is  a  man  of  judgment  and  is  able  to 
draw  logical  and  correct  conclusions  as  to  the  future  conditions  in  real  estate.  Frater- 
nally he  is  identified  with  the  Masonic  order,  in  which  he  has  attained  the  thirty-second 
degree  of  the  Scottish  Rite,  also  belonging  to  Al  Kader  Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine. 
He  is  likewise  connected  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Artisans  and  the  Benevolent 
Protective  Order  of  Elks,  being  a  charter  member  of  the  last  named  organization  and 
a  member  of  the  Grand  Lodge.  He  also  has  membership  relations  with  the  Oregon 
Historical  Society,  the  Sons  and  Daughters  of  Indian  War  Veterans,  the  Realty  Board, 
the  Ad  Club  and  Auld  Lang  Syne  and  his  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican 
party.  Dr.  Cornelius  resides  at  No.  718  Wayne  street,  where  his  two  sisters,  Mrs.  S. 
C.  Van  Horn  and  Miss  Tillie  F.  Cornelius,  and  an  adopted  boy,  Harry  Cornelius,  live 
with  him.  Dr.  Cornelius  gets  much  pleasure  out  of  life  and  at  the  same  time  is  never 
neglectful  of  business  affairs  nor  unmindful  of  his  obligations  and  responsibilities  as 
a  citizen.  In  fact  the  interests  of  his  life  are  well  balanced  and  his  is  indeed  a  well 
rounded  character.  As  a  physician  and  as  a  business  man  he  has  been  very  successful 
and  Portland  numbers  him  among  her  substantial  and  representative  citizens. 


PETER  JOHN  BRIX. 

Peter  John  Brix,  of  Portland,  has  become  eminently  successful  as  a  lumberman 
and  business  man.  Emigrating  to  America  and  settling  in  the  deep  woods  of  the 
Grays  River  country  with  his  parents  and  family,  he  began  when  just  a  boy  to  do  the 
thing  his  hands  found  to  do — namely  roll  logs  into  the  river.  From  the  crude  methods 
of  the  early  days  he  has  advanced  and  by  his  hard  work,  strict  integrity  and  thorough 
reliability  has  become  a  successful  lumberman  and  a  prominent  figure  in  business 
circles  in  Oregon.  He  was  born  in  Germany  in  1870,  a  son  of  Peter  F.  and  Maria 
(Andresen)  Brix,  who  were  also  natives  of  that  country.  The  father  was  born  in 
1835  and  in  the  year  1880  made  his  way  to  the  United  States  with  his  family,  settling 
at  Grays  River,  Washington.  There  the  son  was  reared  and  attended  the  public  schools, 
while  later  he  was  for  a  short  time  a  student  in  an  academy  in  Olympia,  Washington. 


1205989 


PETER   J.   BRIX 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  37 

He  became  actively  engaged  in  the  logging  business  in  that  state  in  1895  and  still 
retains  his  interests  there.  In  1902  he  removed  to  Astoria,  Oregon,  and  in  1918  be- 
came a  resident  of  Portland.  In  the  previous  year,  upon  the  organization  of  the 
Wilson  Shipbuilding  Company,  he  was  elected  to  the  presidency  and  is  at  the  head 
of  the  corporation  at  the  present  time.  He  is  also  a  director  in  the  Astoria  (Ore.) 
Savings  Bank.  His  experiences  in  connection  with  the  logging  and  lumber  business 
have  been  of  the  broadest  possible  character  and  it  is  said  that  he  is  exceedingly 
clever  in  the  operation  of  the  mechanical  end  of  the  business.  He  has  always  led  a 
most  strenuous  life  and  the  thoroughness  of  his  work,  his  indefatigable  energy,  his 
close  application  and  his  most  reliable  and  progressive  business  methods  have  con- 
stituted the  salient  features  in  his  growing  success.  During  the  period  of  the  World 
war  he  got  out  a  large  amount  of  spruce  in  Oregon  for  war  purposes  in  addition  to 
building  ships  for  the  United   States. 

Mr.  Brix  has  been  married  twice  and  has  a  family  of  two  sons  and  a  daughter: 
Herbert  S.,  who  was  born  in  1898;  Irene  L.,  born  in  1904;  and  John  A.,  born  in  1909. 
Mr.  Brix  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party  but  has  never  held  nor 
sought  office  save  that  he  has  served  for  eight  years  on  the  board  of  education  in 
Astoria,  the  interests  of  the  schools  ever  finding  in  him  a  stalwart  champion.  Frater- 
nally he  is  a  Mason  and  his  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Methodist  church.  He  is 
now  serving  on  the  official  board  of  the  Sunnyside  Methodist  church  and  in  this  is 
indicated  the  trend  of  his  entire  activity  outside  of  business.  He  is  of  a  devout,  re- 
ligious disposition  and  almost  his  whole  social  activities  are  in  some  way  connected 
with  a  religious  organization.  He  has  been  teacher  in  the  S;inday  school,  has  served 
as  president  of  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association  and  has  been  most  active  in 
public  and  patriotic  movements  of  the  community.  The  Methodist  colleges  have  also 
received  his  most  earnest  endorsement  and  support.  He  has  contributed  largely  to 
the  Willamette  College  and  the  College  of  Puget  Sound  at  Tacoma,  being  not  limited 
by  the  scriptural  tithe  in  his  giving,  for,  although  possessed  of  large  means,  he  has 
been  known  to  give,  according  to  the  Victory  Loan  slogan,  until  it  hurt.  In  a  word 
he  is  most  generous  where  he  has  believed  his  contributions  to  be  of  signal  benefit 
toward  the  uplift  of  the  individual  and  the   betterment   of   the   community. 


FRANK   E.   SOUTHARD. 


Frank  E.  Southard,  who  became  a  resident  of  Portland  in  1889  and  continued  to 
make  the  city  his  home  until  his  demise  in  1920,  was  born  in  Berlin,  Wisconsin,  Feb- 
ruary 2,  1864,  his  parents  being  Edward  and  Martha  Almira  (Wallbridge)  Southard, 
the  former  a  native  of  the  state  of  New  York  and  the  latter  of  Indiana.  They  became 
residents  of  Wisconsin  in  pioneer  times  and  at  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war  the  father 
joined  the  Union  army  and  served  for  four  years  in  defense  of  the  stars  and  stripes. 
The  ancestry  of  the  family  can  be  traced  back  to  the  Mayflower  and  throughout  all 
the  intervening  period  a  spirit  of  loyalty  and  patriotic  devotion  has  been  manifest  and 
again  came  strongly  to  the  front  with  the  father's  enlistment  and  service  in  the  Civil 
war.  After  the  cessation  of  hostilities  he  returned  to  Wisconsin  and  then  removed  with 
his  family  to  Iowa,  where  he  resided  for  a  few  years  and  later  went  to  Nebraska,  where 
his  remaining  days  were  passed. 

Frank  E.  Southard  obtained  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Nebraska  and  in  young 
manhood  engaged  in  general  merchandising  at  Pawnee,  that  state.  Subsequently  he 
removed  to  St.  Joseph,  Missouri,  filling  the  position  of  paymaster  at  the  stock  yards 
there  for  several  years.  Again,  however,  he  heard  and  heeded  the  call  of  the  west  and 
in  1889  came  to  Portland,  where  he  took  up  bookkeeping,  which  he  followed  for  twenty 
years.  Later  he  engaged  in  the  insurance  business  and  devoted  his  remaining  days 
to  that  pursuit,  being  thus  active  in  the  insurance  field  for  eleven  years. 

In  1891  Mr.  Southard  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Katherine  Sharkey,  a  daugh- 
ter of  Patrick  and  Elizabeth  (McClement)  Sharkey,  who  were  natives  of  Ireland  and 
on  crossing  the  Atlantic  in  early  childhood  settled  first  in  Canada,  having  accompanied 
their  parents  to  the  new  world.  They  spent  some  years  in  Canada  but  later  came  to 
the  United  States  and  spent  several  years  in  West  Virginia  and  finally  in  1886  they 
came  to  Oregon,  establishing  their  home  in  Portland,  where  they  continued  to  reside 
until  called  to  tlieir  final  rest.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Southard  were  born  five  children: 
Harry  E..   who   was   with   Company   B   of   the   One   Hundred   and    Nineteenth    Engineers 


38  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

in  Prance  for  nine  months;  Helen  E.,  the  wife  of  Jerry  Smolik  of  Portland;  Katherine 
L.,  the  wife  of  Joseph  W.  Kehoe,  an  attorney  of  Haines,  Alaska,  who  served  in  the 
European  war  with  the  Ninety-first  Division  and  was  in  France  for  two  years;  Mildred, 
the  w.ife  of  Ira  Marshall  of  Los  Angeles,  California;  and  Elizabeth,  at  home.  Jerry 
Smolik,  son-in-law  of  Mr.  Southard,  is  in  the  United  States  navy  and  is  still  in  the 
service  on  a  submarine.     He  has  served  twelve  years. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Southard  was  a  stalwart  republican,  giving  unfaltering 
allegiance  to  the  party.  Fraternally  he  was  connected  with  the  Independent  Order  of 
Odd  Fellows  and  with  the  Woodmen  of  the  World.  He  held  membership  in  the  Catholic 
church  and  passed  away  in  that  faith  on  the  30th  of  May,  1920.  His  had  been  an  active 
life,  although  in  it  there  were  no  spectacular  phases.  His  course  was  that  of  an 
energetic  and  enterprising  business  man  who  wins  his  success  through  close  application 
and  determined  purpose.  Steadily  he  advanced  as  the  years  went  by  and  Portland 
regarded  him  as  a  thoroughly  reliable  citizen. 


EDGAR  OAKES  DUTRO,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Edgar  0.  Dutro,  a  leading  physician  and  surgeon  of  Hood  River  county,  where 
he  has  been  engaged  in  the  practice  of  his  profession  for  about  fourteen  years,  main- 
taining an  office  in  Odell  and  also  one  in  Hood  River,  is  a  native  of  Illinois,  born  in 
that  state  in  1870. 

Dr.  Dutro  is  a  son  of  Thomas  Corwin  and  Laura  (Savitz)  Dutro,  the  latter  a 
descendant  of  old  residents  in  America  who  were  among  the  early  settlers  of  Dutch 
extraction  in  the  state  of  Pennsylvania,  where  the  name  is  held  in  high  esteem.  The 
Dutros  were  natives  of  Ohio  and  Thomas  C.  Dutro,  the  doctor's  father,  was  reared  and 
educated  in  Zanesville,  Ohio.  He  afterwards  moved  to  St.  Louis,  where  he  occupied  the 
position  of  president  of  the  St.  Louis  Car  Wheel  Company  until  his  death  in  1886. 
This  plant  is  one  of  the  leading  manufactories  in  that  city. 

Dr.  Dutro,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  educated  in  the  grade  and  high  schools 
of  St.  Louis,  in  the  Westminster  College,  Fulton,  Missouri,  and  received  his  professional 
training  in  the  St.  Louis  College  of  Physicians  and  Surgeons,  from  which  he  was  grad- 
uated in  1892  with  the  degree  of  M.  D.  During  the  two  years  following  his  graduation 
he  practiced  his  profession  at  St.  Louis  and  for  a  time  occupied  the  post  of  house  sur- 
geon at  the  Missouri  Pacific  Hospital  in  that  city. 

It  was  in  1894  that  Dr.  Dutro  decided  to  come  to  the  west,  where  he  felt  that 
greater  opportunities  presented  themselves  for  a  young  physician  than  in  the  crowded 
east.  Having  carefully  considered  all  sections  he  decided  in  favor  of  Oregon  for  his 
future  home,  and  on  arrival  in  the  state  he  went  to  Portland,  where  he  opened  an 
office  in  1894,  remaining  in  that  city  until  1898.  From  1895  to  1897  Dr.  Dutro  was 
associated  with  Dr.  A.  E.  Rockey,  one  of  the  most  distinguished  medical  men  on  the 
coast.  He  spent  two  years  as  surgeon  of  one  of  the  large  ocean  liners  and  from  1902 
to  1906  practiced  in  various  parts  of  Wasco  and  Hood  River  counties.  In  the  latter  year 
he  decided  to  locate  in  Hood  River  county  and  has  since  practiced  there. 

Dr.  Dutro  resides  on  his  ranch  at  Odell,  Hoed  River  county,  and  for  the  convenience 
of  his  patients  maintains  an  ofl^ce  at  Odell  and  also  one  at  Hood  River.  He  is  a  deep 
student  and  lias  devoted  himself  almost  exclusively  to  the  interests  of  his  profession, 
following  the  developments  of  medical  and  surgical  science.  While  giving  his  atten- 
tion to  general  practice  he  has  also  specialized  in  the  treatment  of  the  diseases  of 
children  but  the  local  field  for  this  branch  is  not  sufficiently  extensive  to  enable  him 
to  devote  all  of  his  time  to  it.  Dr.  Dutro  is  a  member  of  the  Oregon  Medical  Society 
and  of  the  American  Medical  Association,  and  is  secretary  of  the  Hood  River  General 
Hospital.  Since  coming  to  reside  on  the  coast  he  has  received  the  degree  of  M.  A.  from 
Westminster  College.  He  is  an  active  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fel- 
lows, in  the  affairs  of  which  he  takes  a  warm  interest  and  in  which  he  has  filled  all 
the  chairs. 

In  1902  Dr.  Dutro  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Bertha  Williams,  a  daughter  of 
William  N.  Williams  of  Nebraska,  who  belongs  to  one  of  the  trail  blazer  families  of 
the  west.  Mr.  Williams  operated  one  of  the  early  day  freight  lines  to  the  Wyoming 
country  in  the  days  before  the  advent  of  the  railroads.  William  F.  Cody  (Buffalo  Bill) 
came  from  the  same  family  as  Mrs.  Dutro's  mother.  Two  children  have  been  born  to 
Dr.  and  Mrs.  Dutro.  namely:     Virginia  and  Delma,  students,  respectively,  of  the  high 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  39 

and  grade  schools.  The  doctor  and  his  wife  are  members  of  a  community  in  which 
they  are  extremely  popular  and  where  they  take  a  prominent  part  in  all  social  and 
cultural  movements  designed  to  advance  the  welfare  of  the  people  among  whom  they  live. 


WILLIAM  H.  MILLER. 


In  pioneer  times  in  Oregon,  William  H.  Miller  became  a  resident  of  this  state. 
Those  who  undertook  the  arduous  task  of  planting  the  seeds  of  civilization  in  the 
hitherto  undeveloped  northwest  are  entitled  to  the  gratitude  and  thanks  of  those  who 
have  come  later  and  who  have  enjoyed  the  benefits  of  their  labors.  Great  changes 
have  occurred  since  W.  H.  Miller  arrived  in  Oregon,  coming  to  the  west  from  Missouri. 

William  Henry  Miller  was  born  near  Wheeling,  West  Virginia,  and  was  a  representa- 
tive of  one  of  the  old  families  of  that  state,  the  ancestral  line  being  traced  back  to 
Major  Miller,  who  was  one  of  the  heroes  of  the  Revolutionary  war.  enlisting  from  West 
Virginia  for  service  with  the  American  army  that  after  an  eight  years'  sanguinary 
conflict  won  independence  for  the  American  colonies.  William  Henry  Miller  was  also 
numbered  among  the  military  heroes  of  the  country,  for  he  served  in  the  Mexican  war 
and  after  his  return  from  the  army  made  his  way  across  the  country  to  Oregon  in  1850, 
traveling  over  the  long  hot  stretches  of  sand  and  across  the  mountain  passes  until  he 
reached  the  verdant  hillsides  of  the  Pacific  coast  and  eventually  took  up  his  abode  at 
Astoria.  There  he  secured  a  land  claim  and  upon  that  place  spent  his  remaining  days. 
He  was  one  of  the  early  merchants  of  Astoria  and  was  largely  identified  with  the 
upbuilding,  improvement  and  progress  of  the  town,  his  labors  constituting  an  important 
element  in  its  growth  and  advancement.  Fraternally  he  was  connected  with  the  Masons 
and  was  a  worthy  follower  of  the  teachings  of  the  craft.  He  journeyed  westward  with 
Dr.  Ostrander  and  Seth  Catlin  and  was  therefore  numbered  among  the  earliest  of  the 
pioneers  who  aided  in  laying  broad  and  deep  the  foundation  upon  which  has  been  built 
the  present  progress  and  prosperity  of  the  state. 

William  H.  Miller  was  married  in  Missouri  to  Margaret  Browning.  Their  daughter, 
Margaret  M.  Miller,  became  the  wife  of  George  Balsam  on  September  1,  1891,  and  to 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Balsam  were  born  tour  children:  Constantine  George,  who  enlisted  on  the 
3d  of  December,  1917,  at  Mare  Island,  California,  in  the  United  States  Marine  Corps  for 
service  in  the  World  war  and  was  discharged  March  S,  1919;  Evellea,  Marcina  and 
William  Miller,  all  at  home.  Mrs.  Balsam  and  her  family  reside  at  403  Hancock  street 
in  Portland.  Her  long  residence  in  the  northwest  has  made  her  familiar  with  the 
entire  history  of  this  section  of  the  country.  She  has  seen  its  development  from  a 
wild  and  unimproved  region  and  has  watched  its  transformation  into  a  populous  state, 
with  thriving  towns  and  beautiful  cities,  with  every  known  business  enterprise,  cities 
that  in  turn  are  surrounded  by  rich  farming  districts,  while  in  every  other  way  nature 
has  seemed  most  lavish  in  her  gifts  to  Oregon.  All  this  Mrs.  Balsam  has  witnessed 
and  she  can  relate  many  most  interesting  incidents  of  the  pioneer  times  and  the  changes 
which  have  been  wrought  by  man  as  the  years  have  passed. 


JAMES   P.  LIEUALLEN. 


A  most  prominent  and  progressive  farmer  of  Umatilla  county,  residing  on  section 
twenty-six,  range  thirty-five,  township  four,  post  oifice  Weston,  is  James  P.  Lieuallen, 
who  was  born  on  this  farm  on  the  12th  of  March,  1867,  a  son  of  William  and  Margaret 
(Fuson)  Lieuallen.  William  Lieuallen  was  born  in  Anderson  county,  Tennessee, 
August  7,  1832,  a  son  of  Payton  and  Jemima  (Smith)  Lieuallen.  When  a  small  boy 
William  Lieuallen  left  Tennessee  with  his  parents,  who  settled  neir  St.  Joe,  Missouri, 
but  later  removed  to  Mercer  county,  Missouri,  where  his  father  took  up  homestead  on 
which  he  built  a  log  house.  The  mother  of  William  Lieuallen  died  here  in  1859  and 
some  time  afterward  the  father  went  to  make  his  home  with  a  daughter,  Mrs.  Absalom 
Cox  of  DeKalb  county,  where  he  passed  away.  Throughout  his  life  Payton  Lieuallen  had 
been  a  stanch  supporter  of  the  democratic  party  and  firmly  believed  in  the  principles 
of  that  party  as  factors  in  good  government.  William  Lieuallen  assisted  his  father 
on  the  farm  in  Missouri  until  1864,  when  he  was  married  to  Miss  Margaret  J.  Fuson, 
and  on  April  15,  the  day  after  his  marriage,  he  and  his  bride  started  for  the  west  as 


40  IIISTOKV  OF  OREGON 

members  of  an  emigrant  train.  Many  of  their  fellow  travelers  met  their  death  on  this 
journey,  but  Mr.  and  .Mrs.  Lieuallen  rame  through  unscatched.  The  journey  was  made 
by  way  of  Omaha,  up  the  North  Platte  river,  over  the  Rockie.s  by  way  of  the  Landers 
cutoff  and  down  the  Snake  river,  until  they  reached  what  is  now  known  as  Weston. 
Here  William  Lieuallen  took  up  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  wild 
land,  on  which  he  built  a  log  house,  making  his  home  here  for  some  time.  Here 
he  took  a  prominent  part  in  community  affairs  and  served  the  public  as  justice  of  the 
peace  for  some  time.  He  subsequently  bought  one-half  section  of  railroad  land  up  Pine 
creek  for  a  stock  ranch,  and  in  1899  he  and  his  wife  removed  to  Weston,  where  they 
bought  a  nice  home.  At  the  time  of  his  demise,  March  27,  190S,  he  was  held  in  high 
esteem  in  the  community,  being  readily  recognized  as  one  of  Weston's  representative 
citizens.  William  Lieuallen  also  gave  his  allegiance  to  the  democratic  party  and  his 
fraternal  affiliations  were  with  the  Masons.  He  had  been  a  consistent  member  of  the 
Baptist  church  throughout  his  life,  for  he  had  joined  that  church  in  1859,  having  been 
reared  in  that  faith  since  childhood.  The  wife  of  William  Lieuallen  was  a  native  of  Knox 
county,  Kentucky,  whose  father  died  in  that  county,  and  later  Mrs.  Lieuallen  sent  for 
her  mother  to  come  to  her  home  in  Weston,  and  it  was  while  residing  with  her  daugh- 
ter that  Mrs.  Fuson's  death  occurred.  Three  children  were  born  to  that  union:  Thomas 
A.;  James  P.,  whose  name  initiates  this  review;   and  John  W.,  now  deceased. 

The  boyhood  of  James  P.  Lieuallen  was  spent  on  the  old  home  farm,  on  which  he 
is  now  residing,  and  he  received  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Weston.  Upon  putting 
his  textbooks  aside  he  assisted  his  father  with  the  farm  work,  continuing  in  this  con- 
nection until  his  father's  death,  at  which  time  he  fell  heir  to  one-half  of  his  father's 
farm  land,  Thomas  A.  being  the  recipient  of  the  other  half.  In  agricultural  circles  Mr. 
Lieuallen  is  widely  known  as  being  most  successful  and  progressive  and  he  is  in 
possession  of  two  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  farm  land  and  has  three  hundred  and 
fifteen  acres  in  pasturage  in  addition  to  much  range  land.  On  his  ranch  he  runs  large 
numbers  of  cattle,  specializing  in  the  Hereford  breed. 

In  1893  Mr.  Lieuallen  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Eva  G.  Logan,  a  daughter 
of  Miles  and  Mary  Logan,  and  a  native  of  McCune,  Kansas.  Mrs.  Lieuallen  came  west 
with  her  mother,  her  father  having  died  as  the  result  of  wounds  received  in  the  Civil 
war.  Mr.  Logan  entered  the  service  in  1S62  and  served  two  years,  when  he  was  honorably 
discharged,  on  account  of  ill  health.  To  the  union  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lieuallen  ten  chil- 
dren have  been  born:  Roy.  Lena.  Mabel,  James,  Geneva,  Lois,  Thomas,  Harlan,  Herman, 
and  Georgia. 

Since  age  conferred  upon  Mr.  Lieuallen  the  right  of  franchise  he  has  been  a  stanch 
supporter  of  the  democratic  party,  in  the  interests  of  which  he  has  always  taken  an 
active  part.  He  is  fraternally  affiliated  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  Knights  of  Khoras- 
san,  and  the  Woodmen  of  the  World,  and  in  connection  with  his  stock  raising  interests 
he  is  a  member,  as  well  as  president,  of  the  Stock  Association  of  Wenaha,  and  at  Walla 
Walla.  He  is  also  president  of  the  association  in  Weston,  which  he  has  served  in  that 
capacity  since  its  organization  four  years  ago. 


CHARLES  A.  LOCKWOOD. 


Charles  A.  Lockwood  is  one  of  the  active  young  business  men  of  Roseburg  whose 
present  enviable  position  is  attributable  entirely  to  his  ability,  integrity  and  energy. 
He  was  born  at  Laurel.  Indiana,  November  9,  1SS8,  and  is  a  son  of  Oliver  and  Belle 
(Gwinup)  Lockwood.  His  father,  a  farmer  by  occupation,  became  one  of  the  pioneer 
settlers  of  Indiana  and  contributed  to  the  early  development  of  that  state.  He  was 
descended  from  Samuel  Lockwood.  one  of  the  heroes  of  the  Revolutionary  war.  The 
mother  was  a  native  of  Indiana  and  came  of  a  long  line  of  New  England  ancestors. 

Charles  A.  Lockwood  was  educated  in  the  graded  and  high  schools  of  his  native 
town  and  engaged  in  farming  with  his  father  until  he  reached  the  age  of  eighteen 
years,  when  he  resolved  to  start  out  in  life  on  his  own  account.  He  had  no  capital 
but  American  pluck  and  determination,  and  with  these  as  a  foundation  on  which  to 
build  success  he  went  to  Indianapolis,  where  he  secured  employment  with  the  E.  C. 
Atkins  Saw  Company,  with  which  he  remained  for  about  two  years.  He  then  took 
the  mail  service  examination  and  spent  the  next  year  as  a  railway  mail  clerk  but 
at  the  end  of  that  time  was  compelled  to  resign  on  account  of  a  severe  attack  of 
typhoid  fever.     In  1911  he  came  to  Portland,  where  he  engaged  in  the  fisheries  business 


CHARLES   A.   LOCKWOOD 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  43 

for  one  season,  and  later  he  secured  employment  with  the  Warner  Speedometer  Com- 
pany, with  which  he  remained  until  the  company  was  absorbed  by  the  Stewart  Speed- 
ometer Company.  He  had  a  natural  bent  tor  mechanics  and  soon  acquired  intimate 
and  expert  knowledge  of  the  mechanical  end  of  the  business.  Accordingly  when  in 
1915  the  company  decided  to  discontinue  the  operation  of  their  service  station,  he 
purchased  the  Portland  station  and  conducted  it  until  1920,  when  he  was  tendered 
the  agency  of  the  Ford  Company  for  Douglas  county  and  the  same  year  removed  to 
Roseburg,  where  he  has  since  remained.  He  is  conducting  his  business  under  the  name 
of  the  C.  A.  Lockwood  Motor  Company,  occupying  premises  eighty  by  one  hundred  feet 
at  the  corner  of  Rose  and  Oak  streets,  where  he  has  a  showroom  for  Ford  cars  and 
Fordson  tractors,  besides  a  service  station  and  an  accessory  department.  As  an  example 
of  the  pushing  business  ability  of  this  young  man,  it  may  be  stated  that  he  has  placed 
some  two  hundred  Fordson  tractors  on  the  farms  of  Douglas  county  and  has  also 
been  equally  successful   in  the  sale  of  motor  cars. 

In  October,  1915,  Mr.  Lockwood  was  married  to  Miss  Leila  Burch,  a  daughter  of 
W.  C.  Burch,  of  Gresham,  Oregon,  one  of  the  pioneer  miners  of  this  state.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Lockwood  are  members  of  the  Methodist  church,  and  fraternally  he  is  connected 
with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  belongs  to  the  Roseburg  Chamber 
of  Commerce,  of  which  he  is  now  serving  on  the  board  of  directors,  and  he  has  mem- 
bership in  the  State  Automobile  Association.  His  position  in  the  business  and  social 
circles  of  Roseburg  is  assured  and  he  has  made  many  friends  during  the  period  of  his 
residence  in  this  part  of  the  state. 


FRANK  BOONE   INGELS. 


Prank  Boone  Ingels  is  one  of  the  most  prominent  ranchmen  of  central  Oregon.  His 
interests  are  most  extensive  and  important  and  his  labors  have  demonstrated  the  pos- 
sibility for  successful  achievement  in  wheat  raising  and  in  the  production  of  other 
crops.  He  is  likewise  successfully  engaged  in  raising  cattle  and  in  all  things  demon- 
strates his  ability  to  sense  quickly  the  opportunities  of  any  business  situation  and 
wisely  to  direct  his  activities  along  the  lines  where  fruition  is  certain. 

Mr.  Ingels  was  born  at  Ingelside,  Lexington,  Kentucky,  in  1882.  His  father,  Evan  S. 
Ingels,  was  of  Scotch  English  descent  and  belonged  to  a  pioneer  family  of  which  the 
famous  explorer,  Daniel  Boone,  was  also  a  representative.  The  home  in  Kentucky 
in  which  many  representatives  of  the  Ingels  family  were  born  was  one  of  Lexington's 
show  places.  It  was  built  on  exactly  the  same  specifications  and,  surrounded  by  spacious 
grounds,  was  a  replica  of  the  baronial  home  of  the  family  in  the  north  of  England,  on 
the  Scottish  border.  Evan  S.  Ingels  great-grandfather  founded  and  operated  the  first 
iron  foundry  west  of  the  Alleghanies.  The  mother  of  Frank  B.  Ingels  bore  the  maiden 
name  of  Jennie  McGranigan  and  was  a  daughter  of  one  of  the  old  established  Kentucky 
families.  Her  great-granduncle,  Clark  by  name,  was  one  of  the  signers  of  the  Declara- 
tion of  Independence,  and  her  father,  Dr.  William  McGranigan,  was  not  only  a  pioneer 
of  Kentucky  but  also  one  of  the  leading  physicians  of  the  state. 

It  can  readily  be  understood  that  born  of  such  parentage  and  reared  in  such  an 
atmosphere  Frank  B.  Ingels  started  out  in  life  equipped  with  strong  and  forceful  char- 
acteristics that  have  developed  him  into  a  man  possessed  of  qualities  of  leadership.  He 
obtained  his  education  at  the  common  schools  of  Lexington  and  in  the  University  of 
Kentucky.  He  initiated  his  business  career  by  securing  a  position  in  the  office  of  the 
superintendent  of  the  Queen  &  Crescent  Railroad  Company,  there  remaining  for  three 
years.  He  afterward  accepted  the  position  of  general  mail  and  baggage  foreman  with 
the  St.  Louis  Terminal  Railroad  Company  and  continued  to  occupy  that  position  until 
1906,  when  he  retired  to  accept  a  post  with  the  government  in  connection  with  the 
Panama  Canal.  It  was  about  this  time,  his  friends  having  extolled  to  him  the  beauties 
of  Alaska  and  the  opportunities  for  success  there,  that  the  blood  of  his  forebears  began 
to  assert  itself  and  he  determined  to  try  his  fortune  in  the  golden  north.  He  mushed 
from  Valdez  to  Fairbanks,  Alaska,  a  distance  of  four  hundred  and  five  miles,  and  upon 
his  arrival  at  the  latter  camp  accepted  the  post  of  teller  in  the  Fairbanks  Bank.  Anxious, 
however,  to  do  outside  work,  he  was  assigned  to  the  Gold  Pack  train,  composed  of  a 
company  of  hardy  men  whose  duty  it  was  to  take  care  of  the  gold  dust  in  transit  from  the 
several  mines  to  the  bank.  After  one  season  he  left  that  work  and  began  digging 
gold   on  his  own  account.     He  met  with   success  in  the   undertaking  and   remained   in 


44  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

Alaska  until  1913.  While  mining  he  was  also  engaged  in  merchandising,  being  one  of 
the  owners  of  the  E.  W.  Griffin  Mercantile  Company  that  operated  stores  at  Cheno, 
Ruby.  Idittarod  and  other  camps.  In  1913  he  left  Alaska  but  did  not  dispose  ot  his 
interests  then  nor  has  he  done  so  to  the  present  time. 

While  located  in  the  far  north  Mr.  Ingels  came  out  of  Alaska  many  times  and  in 
passing  through  central  Oregon  he  says  he  never  dreamed  of  what  was  behind  the  hills 
ot  Wasco  county.  In  1913,  however,  he  was  called  to  The  Dalles  and  visited  the  Dufur 
section.  The  fertility,  beauty  and  value  of  the  district  at  once  decided  him  to  locate. 
His  first  purchase  made  him  owner  of  sixteen  hundred  acres  adjoining  the  town  of 
Dufur  and  in  fact  a  portion  of  his  land  was  within  the  town  limits.  Upon  this  portion 
there  had  been  erected  a  commodious  brick  hotel  called  the  Balch  Hotel,  which  is  one 
of  the  best  to  be  found  in  the  inferior  towns  of  the  state.  The  section  of  the  ranch 
upon  which  the  hotel  is  located  is  within  the  corporation  limits  of  Dufur  and  all  of 
the  east  and  west  streets  pass  through  his  ranch  property.  In  addition  to  this  holding 
ilr.  Ingels  purchased  eight  hundred  and  eighty  acres  on  Fifteen  Mile  creek,  which  he 
also  operates,  ninety  acres  being  devoted  to  an  apple  orchard,  while  about  one  hundred 
and  fifty  acres  is  planted  to  alfalfa  and  the  remainder  to  corn  and  wheat,  with  some 
pasturage  land.  Six  thousand  bushels  of  wheat  are  his  usual  crop.  In  addition  to 
cultivating  wheat  and  other  cereals  and  developing  further  his  orchard  interests,  Mr. 
Ingels  also  breeds  Aberdeen  Angus  cattle,  having  registered  sires  at  the  head  of  his 
herd.  He  likewise  raises  Hampshire  sheep,  both  sires  and  ewes  being  registered,  and 
Duroc  Jersey  hogs.  In  1919  he  shipped  three  carloads  of  hogs  alone,  in  addition  to 
the  sheep  and  cattle  which  he  sold.  Both  of  his  ranches  are  equipped  with  the  latest 
labor-saving  devices  and  the  most  improved  farm  implements  and  are  numbered  among 
the  most  highly  developed  and  perfected  ranch  properties  in  America.  Employment 
is  given  to  about  thirty  hands  at  all  times,  which  number  is  largely  increased  in  the 
harvest  season. 

In  1909  Mr.  Ingels  was  married  to  Miss  Ethel  Stanley  Chambers,  a  daughter  of 
J.  H.  Chambers,  one  of  the  prominent  manufacturers  of  St.  Louis,  Missouri.  He  was 
president  of  the  Dyas  Chemical  Company  and  president  of  the  Chambers  Publishing 
Company  and  he  was  a  member  of  the  Betty  Ross  Clan.  The  family  were  founders  of 
the  town  of  Chambersburg,  Pennsylvania,  and  the  original  American  ancestors  came 
to  the  new  world  prior  to  the  Revolutionary  war.  Mr.  Ingels  has  two  sons:  James 
Shelby,  who  was  named  in  honor  of  Governor  Shelby,  an  ancestor,  who  was  the  first 
governor  of  Kentucky;  and  Frank  Boone,  whose  middle  name  was  given  him  from  the 
fact  that  his  ancestors  were  connected  with  the  Boone  family  who  were  pioneers  of 
Kentucky. 

Mr.  Ingels  has  no  taste  for  public  office  save  where  his  services  can  benefit  the  com- 
munity. He  is  a  member  of  the  Dufur  school  board  and  of  the  Dufur  water  commission 
and  is  a  director  of  the  state  vocational  training  commission.  He  was  made  a  director 
of  the  Farmers  Union,  is  president  of  the  Wasco  Union  Elevator  and  president  of  the 
Wasco  County  Live  Stock  Association.  He  cooperates  with  every  plan  and  measure 
that  tends  to  promote  progress  and  improvement  in  his  locality  and  state.  He  is  a 
Mason  and  member  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Arctic  Brother- 
hood. He  is  uniformly  regarded  as  a  valuable  acquisition  to  Wasco  county  and  the 
state  of  Oregon  and  liis  neighbors  are  warm  in  his  praise  as  a  business  man  and  as  a 
citizen.  His  activities  have  indeed  been  a  valuable  element  in  connection  with  public 
progress  and  it  will  be  long  ere  the  interests  which  he  has  instituted  reach  their  full 
fruition  in  the  world's  work. 


ROBERT  J.  STEWART. 

Robert  J.  Stewart,  a  leading  building  contractor  of  Portland,  has  been  awarded 
many  important  contracts,  having  constructed  a  number  of  the  city's  most  substantial 
public  buildings  and  also  numerous  private  residences  here,  his  labors  proving  a  val- 
uable element  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  municipality.  He  was  born  at  Black  Point,  on 
Prince  Edward's  island,  Canada,  January  22,  1S55,  and  is  a  son  of  Dougal  and  Flora 
(McKinnon)    Stewart,  both  of  Scotch  descent,  the  father  a  farmer  by  occupation. 

In  the  district  schools  of  his  home  locality  Robert  J.  Stewart  acquired  his  educa- 
tion, the  nearest  schoolhouse  being  two  miles  distant  from  his  home.  He  assisted  his 
father  in  the  operation  of  the  farm  until  sixteen  years  of  age,  when  he  learned  the  car- 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  45 

penter's  trade  and  in  lSi77  went  to  St.  Johns,  New  Brunswick,  wliere  he  worked  at 
his  trade  until  1888.  On  the  7th  of  July  of  that  year  he  arrived  in  Portland  and  for  a 
time  there  followed  carpentering,  subsequently  going  to  Vancouver,  Washington,  as 
an  employe  of  a  Mr.  Goss  who  had  a  government  contract  for  the  erection  of  some 
buildings  in  that  city.  After  completing  his  work  there  Mr.  Stewart  returned  to 
Portland  and  engaged  in  business  independently  as  a  contractor  and  builder,  gradually 
working  up  a  good  trade  in  that  connection.  He  is  an  expert  carpenter  and  is  thor- 
oughly trustworthy,  executing  contracts  promptly  and  living  up  to  the  letter  as  well 
as  the  spirit  of  an  agreement.  He  has  been  awarded  many  important  contracts  in  the 
city,  building  the  cordage  works  at  Fourteenth  and  Marshall  streets  for  W.  B.  Ayers 
and  the  Worcester  building  for  the  Corbett  estate.  For  practically  twenty  years  he 
was  engaged  in  work  for  the  Corbett  and  Failing  families,  prominent  pioneer  residents 
of  this  city  for  whom  he  erected  the  HamiltonCorbett,  the  Failing  and  the  Newstatter 
buildings  and  George  Lawrence  and  Company's  building  on  First  street.  Among  others 
for  whom  Mr.  Stewart  erected  and  remodeled  buildings  may  be  mentioned  the  late 
Henry  Hewett  who  at  that  time  was  a  leading  insurance  man  of  Portland  and  an 
intimate  friend  of  the  subject  of  this  review.  He  also  did  work  for  the  O'Shea  brothers 
and  erected  the  annex  to  the  Portland  hotel,  in  addition  to  many  private  residences  in 
all  parts  of  the  city  and  adjoining  districts.  His  business  has  reached  extensive  and 
profitable  proportions  and  he  has  become  recognized  as  one  of  the  leading  building 
contractors  of  Portland. 

In  the  Rose  City,  in  1S95,  Mr.  Stewart  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mary 
Anderson,  a  native  of  Scotland  and  a  daughter  of  William  Anderson.  Mrs.  Stewart 
passed  away  in  October,  1915,  leaving  a  son,  Robert  Alexander,  who  is  now  attending 
the   Oregon  Agricultural   College   at   Corvallis. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Stewart  is  a  republican  and  in  religious  faith  he  is  a 
Presbyterian.  Fraternally  he  is  identified  with  Hassalo  Lodge,  I.  0.  0.  F..  and  his 
interest  in  the  welfare  and  advancement  of  his  city  is  indicated  by  his  membership  in 
the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  In  his  business  affairs  he  has  made  steady  progress,  his 
capable  management  and  indefatigable  industry  constituting  the  basis  upon  which  he 
has  builded  his  prosperity.  His  powers  of  organization  and  his  executive  force  have 
enabled  him  to  develop  a  business  of  extensive  proportions  and  his  record  is  written 
not  only  in  terms  of  success  but  also  in  terms  of  enterprise,  energy  and  perseverance. 
He  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  leading  citizens  of  Portland  and  his  progressiveness  has 
been  a  potent  element  in  its  continued  development. 


WESLEY  WOODSON  BOSCOW. 

A  native  son  of  Oregon  who  has  materially  aided  in  the  up-building  of  his  state 
and  county  is  W'.  W.  Boscow,  who  was  born  in  Washington  county  in  1866.  His  pater- 
nal ancestors  were  natives  of  the  Isle  of  Man  and  were  prominent  in  the  shipping 
business.  Emigrating  to  America  in  1845  his  grandfather  purchased  a  farm  in  Illinois 
where  Peter  Boscow  was  born.  The  latter  married  Rebecca  Cray,  a  daughter  of  an 
old  family  of  Ohio  pioneers,  and  removed  to  Oregon,  settling  upon  a  farm  near  North 
Plains  in  Washington  county,  where  their  son  Wesley  Woodson  Boscow  was  born. 
For  forty  years  Peter  Boscow.  now  retired,  has  been  school  clerk  of  this  township  anil 
has  held  many  other  ofl^ces. 

Wesley  W.  Boscow  was  educated  in  the  grade  schools  of  Washington  county  and 
assisted  his  father  on  the  farm  during  most  of  his  boyhood.  He  inherited  a  sturdy 
constitution  and  a  stout  heart  and  in  1898,  braving  the  rigors  of  the  far  north,  he  set 
out  to  seek  his  fortune  in  Alaska.  As  a  clerk  in  a  Skagway  store  and  later  in  the  post 
office  at  Nome  he  remained  in  Alaska  until  1901.  Upon  his  return  to  Oregon  he  was 
connected  with  a  general  merchandise  business  until  1912  when  he  established  his 
present  enterprise.  His  store,  the  only  clothing  establishment  in  Hillsboro,  is  situated 
on  Main  street  in  the  best  business  section  of  the  town.  He  occupies  an  area  twenty- 
four  by  one  hundred  feet  on  two  floors  and  carries  a  full  assortment  of  men's  and  boys' 
clothing,  shoes  and  furnishings.  The  men  of  Washington  county  assuredly  have  no 
reason  to  go  to  Portland  for  wearing  apparel,  since  Mr.  Boscow's  stock  is  at  all  times 
complete  and  up-to-date.  In  addition  to  his  clothing  establishment  Mr.  Boscow  owns 
thirty  acres  of  valuable  land  within  the  limits  of  Hillsboro. 

Mr.  Boscow  married  Mercedes  Wilson,  a  daughter  of  W.  B.  Wilson,  a  pioneer  farmer 


46  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

of  Washington  county.  Like  her  husband  she  is  justly  proud  of  being  a  native  of  Oregon. 
Before  her  marriage  she  was  a  teacher  in  the  schools  of  Washington  county.  She  is  an 
active  church  worker  and  has  a  host  of  friends.     There  are  no  children. 

Mr.  Boscow  has  no  fraternal  afflliations.  His  political  achievements  have  been 
limited  to  membership  in  the  Hillsboro  city  council  for  three  years.  In  a  business  way 
he  is  a  member  of  the  Hillsboro  Commercial  Club  and  has  served  on  its  board  of 
directors.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Oregon  Merchants'  Association  and  has  proved 
himself  in  every  respect  one  of  the  potent  upbuilders  of  the  state  of  his  birth. 


WILLIAM  EDWARD  WELCH,  M.  D. 

Dr.  William  Edward  Welch,  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  in  Rainier,  was 
born  in  Missouri  in  1861.  He  is  the  son  of  Dr.  John  and  Ann  E.  (Clements)  Welch, 
who  came  to  Oregon  by  ox  team  in  1863.  His  father  was  a  well  known  dentist  and 
practiced   his   profession    in   Portland   and    Oregon   City    until    his   death   in    1905. 

William  Edward  Welch  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Oregon  City,  the 
University  of  Oregon,  and  Rush  Medical  College  at  Chicago,  from  which  latter  institu- 
tion he  was  graduated  in  1886  as  M.  D.  He  first  took  up  his  practice  in  Oregon  City 
and  in  a  short  time  was  tendered  the  position  of  District  Surgeon  for  the  Santa  Fe 
Railway  Company,  so  he  moved  to  Kansas,  where  he  remained  for  fifteen  years. 
While  residing  there  Dr.  Welch  built  up  a  lucrative  practice,  besides  acting  as  surgeon 
for  the  Santa  Fe  Railroad  and  the  Kannsas  City,  Fort  Scott  and  Memphis  Railroad. 
In  1905  the  lure  of  the  west  called  him  and  he  returned  to  Oregon,  taking  up  his  work 
at  Rainier,  Columbia  county.  Since  his  return  he  has  built  up  a  large  practice  and 
has  come  to  be  regarded  as  one  of  the  prominent  and  able  physicians  of  the  state. 

In  ISSS  Dr.  Welch  was  married  to  Miss  Adaline  L.  Smith  of  Chicago,  who  died  in 
1918.  Mrs.  Welch  was  an  invalid  for  more  than  twenty  years  and  his  ceaseless  devo- 
tion to  his  wife  was  one  of  the  outstanding  traits  in  the  character  of  the  Doctor. 

Dr.  Welch  is  a  man  of  strong  and  independent  characteristics,  positive,  somewhat 
aggressive  and  thoroughly  fearless.  He  is  an  earnest  believer  in  the  Golden  Rule, 
which  he  endeavors  to  follow  in  his  everyday  affairs  and  expects  the  same  fair  treat- 
ment from  those  with  whom  he  has  dealings.  He  has  served  as  mayor  of  Rainier,  chair- 
man of  the  water  commission  and  city  health  officer.  In  politics  he  is  a  democrat  and 
has  been  chairman  of  the  Democratic  County  Committee.  He  is  foremost  in  all  civic 
enterprises,  a  large  stockholder  in  the  State  Bank  of  Rainier,  a  member  of  the  Commer- 
cial Club  and  of  the  Portland  City  and  County  Medical  Association.  Dr.  Welch  is  much 
respected  in  and  out  of  his  profession  and  his  forceful  character  is  admired  by  a  host 
of  friends.  He  is  a  most  interesting  and  well  informed  conversationalist  and  an 
optimist  in  every  way  except  in  those  things  which  foster  hypocrisy. 


HARRY   BURNHAM   EVANS. 

One  of  the  prominent  bankers  of  Clackamas  county  is  Harry  Burnham  Evans,  who 
came  west  in  1913  and  settled  in  the  Willamette  valley,  w^here  he  immediately  became 
interested  in  banking  affairs.  He  was  born  in  the  state  of  Maine,  forty-nine  years  ago, 
his  birth  having  taken  place  in  1871,  in  Portland.  His  father  was  William  Evans,  who 
engaged  in  the  carpet  manufacturing  business.  His  mother.  Frances  Burnham,  was  a 
descendant  of  an  old  New  England  family,  as  was  his  father,  and  her  family  came  to 
America  as  early  as  1630.  Among  her  ancestors  was  Nathaniel  Burnham,  who  served 
in  the  Revolutionary  war.  For  many  generations  the  Burnham  family  have  been 
bankers. 

H.  B.  Evans  is  indebted  to  the  public  schools  and  high  school  of  his  native  town 
for  his  education  and  when  but  a  youth  he  removed  to  Lincoln.  Nebraska,  and  entered 
the  banking  business.  An  uncle  of  Mr.  Evans  was  president  of  this  bank  and  under 
his  watchful  eye  Mr.  Evans  learned  tlie  banking  business  from  the  bottom  to  the  top 
of  the  ladder.  For  twenty-two  years  he  remained  in  the  Nebraska  bank,  passing  from 
one  position  to  another  until  he  reached  the  position  of  cashier.  It  was  this  close  appli- 
cation to  his  banking  interests  and  thorough  mastering  of  this  work  that  made  him 
the  successful  banker  that  he  is  today.     In  1913  he  decided  to  remove  farther  west  and 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  47 

subsequently  settled  in  the  Willamette  valley  of  Oregon,  quick  to  realize  the  many 
opportunities  it  offered.  He  purchased  an  interest  in  the  State  Bank  at  Canby  and 
became  its  cashier.  In  1914  he  assisted  in  the  organization  of  the  First  National  Bank 
at  Canby,  of  which  institution  he  was  elected  cashier  and  still  holds  that  position,  to 
the  entire  satisfaction  of  the  bank  and  its  patrons.  Upon  his  resignation  as  cashier  of 
the  Canby  State  Bank  the  stockholders  of  that  institution,  loath  to  lose  his  services 
entirely,  elected  him  vice  president  and  at  every  election  held  since  that  time  he  has 
been  reelected  to  that  position. 

In  the  year  1898  Mr.  Evans  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Catharine  Brooks,  a 
daughter  of  H.  D.  Brooks,  who  was  a  native  of  New  York  but  who  came  to  Lincoln, 
Nebraska,  at  an  early  date,  thereby  becoming  one  of  its  pioneer  and  highly  respected 
citizens.  He  also  served  in  the  Civil  war.  One  daughter  has  been  born  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Evans,  Catharine,  who  is  a  senior  at  the  University  of  Washington,  and  a  young 
woman  of  much  promise.  Mrs.  Evans  is  a  prominent  woman  in  her  community,  being 
very  active  in  club  circles  and  a  recognized  social  leader  of  Clackamas  county.  She 
has  always  been  interested  in  anything  pertaining  to  the  moral  and  intellectual  growth 
of  the  community  and  to  that  end  was  a  former  executive  of  the  Parent-Teachers' 
Association. 

Although  it  is  necessary  for  Mr.  Evans  to  devote  the  most  of  his  time  to  his  bank- 
ing interests  he  has  yet  found  time  to  do  his  full  duty  as  a  citizen,  has  served  Canby 
as  a  member  of  the  city  council  for  five  years  and  is  chairman  of  Group  1  of  the 
Oregon  State  Banks,  which  organization  embraces  the  banks  of  several  counties.  Fra- 
ternally he  is  affiliated  with  the  Masons  and  Odd  Fellows  and  is  one  of  Oregon's  most 
progressive  and  active  upbuilders.  As  a  banker  he  occupies  a  high  place  in  Clackamas 
county  and  as  a  citizen  he   is  universally  esteemed. 


HORACE  W.  OGILBB 


There  is  no  class  of  men  whose  contribution  to  the  development  and  upbuilding 
of  a  new  region  is  more  distinct  and  valuable  than  is  that  of  the  civil  engineer,  who  is 
calle;l  upon  to  face  difficult  and  complex  problems  in  his  constructive  work  and  whose 
labors  must  be  the  forerunner  of  various  other  activities.  In  this  connection  Horace 
W.  Ogilbe  made  for  himself  a  prominent  name  and  place.  He  came  to  the  northwest 
during  the  era  of  pioneer  settlement  and  for  many  years  was  prominently  associated 
with  the  business  life  of  Portland  and  the  northwest,  contributing  in  large  measure  to 
ihe  jetty  and  harbor  development  of  the  Oregon  coast  and  working  as  well  on  the 
Cascades,  locks  and  canals.  He  likewise  executed  many  private  contracts  aside  from 
his  government  work  and  his  efforts  were  at  all  times  an  important  feature  in  Oregon's 
upbuilding. 

Mr.  Ogilbe  came  to  the  coast  country  from  Pennsylvania,  his  birth  having  occurred 
in  Germantown,  that  state,  September  3,  1853,  his  parents  being  Samuel  B.  and  Louisa 
(Williams)  Ogilbe,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Germantown  and  were  of  Welsh 
descent.  Horace  W.  Ogilbe  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
state  and  in  the  Pennsylvania  University,  from  which  he  was  graduated.  He  afterward 
went  to  Europe,  where  he  studied  for  about  two  years,  thus  gaining  still  broader  knowl- 
edge concerning  his  chosen  profession.  Upon  his  return  to  America  he  made  his  way 
to  California,  where  he  had  a  seat  on  the  stock  board.  He  became  actively  connected 
with  important  interests  in  that  state,  being  associated  with  Flood.  Comstock  &  O'Brien 
as  a  mining  engineer  until  1879,  when  he  came  to  Portland  and  was  made  assistant 
under  Colonel  Wilson  who  had  charge  of  rivers  and  harbors.  Among  his  first  activities 
after  reaching  Oregon  was  his  government  work  on  the  Cascades  at  The  Dalles  and 
later  he  was  engaged  in  coast  work.  About  1881  he  opened  an  office  in  the  Ainsworth 
Bank  building  in  Portland,  where  he  remained  for  several  years,  during  which  time 
he  was  accorded  and  executed  many  important  contracts  and  also  did  important  work 
as  consulting  engineer.  He  was  engineer  for  the  firm  of  Leonard  &  Green  when  they 
changed  their  pumping  station  to  Rivera  and  he  also  was  engineer  on  the  location  and 
construction  of  the  Narrow  Gauge  Railroad  and  did  civil  engineering  work  for  the 
Northern  Pacific  on  the  Stampede  Pass  in  1880  and  1S81.  In  1903  he  established  an 
office  in  San  Francisco  as  mining  and  consulting  engineer  and  he  spent  many  years 
in  professional  work  in  Mexico  and  in  Alaska  as  representative  of  the  American  Tin 
.Mining   Company,    remaining   through    one   winter    in    Nome.      In    1912    he   gave    up    his 


48  HiyTOKY  OF  ORPXiOX 

office  and  retired  to  his  home  on  Palatine  Hill  in  Portland,  spending  his  remaining 
days  in  the  enjoyment  of  a  well  earned  rest,  death  coming  to  him  very  suddenly. 

It  was  on  the  16th  of  November,  1881,  that  Mr.  Ogilbe  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Sophia  Holman.  a  daughter  of  Charles  and  Mary  E.  (Huntington)  Holman.  They 
became  the  parents  of  two  daughters:  Belle,  who  is  now  the  wife  of  Carl  V.  Taylor  of 
Palatine  Hill.  Portland;  and  Catherine,  a  teacher  of  language  in  the  Franklin  high 
school. 

Mr.  Ogilbe  was  a  representative  of  the  Masonic  fraternity  in  early  life.  In  politics 
he  was  a  true  blue  republican,  giving  unswerving  allegiance  to  the  party  and  its  prin- 
ciples. Of  the  Episcopal  faith  he  attended  St.  Stephen's  chapel,  now  the  pro-cathedral, 
and  passed  away  in  that  belief  April  28,  1920.  Throughout  his  entire  life  he  had  dis- 
played many  sterling  traits  of  character.  He  had  made  wise  use  of  his  time,  talents 
and  opportunities  and  had  risen  to  a  high  position  in  his  profession.  He  was,  more- 
over, a  man  of  kindly  nature  and  genial  disposition  whose  life  illustrated  the  truth 
of  the  Emersonian  philosophy  that  the  way  to  win  a  friend  is  to  be  one. 


ALFRED  A.  AYA. 


Alfred  A.  Aya,  is  vice  president  and  general  manager  of  the  Peninsula  Industrial 
Company,  a  holding  company  tor  the  Swift  interests  in  North  Portland.  He  makes 
his  home  in  the  city  of  Portland  and  there  is  perhaps  no  man  in  Oregon  who  is  better 
informed  concerning  the  resources  and  possibilities  of  the  state,  or  has  contributed 
in  more  direct  measures  to  Oregon's  advancement  in  this  connection.  He  was  born 
in  Albert  Lea,  Minnesota,  June  15,  1879,  and  is  a  son  of  Louis  Aya,  who  was  born 
in  Bavaria,  and  was  brought  to  the  United  States  by  his  parents  in  infancy,  the  family 
home  being  established  in  Fountain  City,  Wisconsin,  while  later  a  removal  was  made 
to  Minnesota.  Louis  Aya  was  married  to  Miss  Amelia  Bronnenkant  and  in  the  year 
1889  he  removed  to  the  northwest,  settling  in  Eugene,  Oregon,  where  he  passed  away 
in   1914. 

Alfred  A.  obtained  his  early  education  in  the  schools  of  'Winona,  Minnesota,  and 
afterward  attended  a  private  school  in  Eugene,  Oregon.  He  then  sought  to  make  the 
practice  of  law  his  life  work  and  was  graduated  in  1903  from  the  law  department 
of  the  University  of  Oregon  with  the  LL.  B.  degree.  This  same  year  he  was  admitted 
to  the  bar,  beginning  the  practice  of  law  in  the  office  of  Cicero  M.  Idleman,  in  Port- 
land, opening  his  own  office  in  Portland  in  1905,  but  after  devoting  six  years  to  active 
practice  he  withdrew  in  1909,  having  become  connected  with  industries  which  required 
his  full  time.  In  1905  he  became  interested  in  irrigation  and  other  development  work  in 
central  Oregon  and  is  now  vice  president  and  general  manager  of  the  Peninsula  Indus- 
trial Company,  president  of  the  Peninsula  Drainage  Districts  Numbers  1  and  2,  director 
in  the  Kenton  Traction  Company  and  Peninsula  Terminal  Company,  and  manager 
of  the  Kenwood  Land  Company,  all  being  largely  Swift  interests  in  North  Portland. 
His  business  qualifications  and  abilities  are  pronounced.  He  loses  sight  of  no  detail, 
is  a  good  organizer,  is  very  thorough,  original  and  resourceful.  There  are  few  men 
who  have  equal  knowledge  concerning  the  resources  and  possibilities  of  Oregon.  He 
has  made  a  careful  and  thorough  study  of  the  state's  various  industrial  activities 
and  has  acquired  a  fund  of  information  of  which  he  has  made  good  use  in  bringing 
to  Oregon  some  of  its  most  important  industries.  He  has  likewise  been  instrumental 
in  keeping  before  the  public  the  need  of  the  state  for  more  industries  and  a  greater 
population,  that  its  growth  and  development  may  be  continuously  promoted.  Mr.  Aya 
is  the  president  and  general  manager  of  the  La  Pine  (Oregon)  Townsite  Company. 
Mr.  Aya  founded  this  town,  which  is  situated  in  central  Oregon,  in  1910.  At  that  time 
it  was  one  hundred  and  twenty-five  miles  from  a  railroad.  From  1909  to  the  fall 
of  191S,  when  he  returned  to  Portland,  he  devoted  practically  all  of  his  time  to  the 
development  of  that  section  of  the  state  and  recognizing  the  need  of  bringing  more 
settlers  to  Oregon  it  was  then  that  he  became  instrumental  in  organizing  the  State 
Chamber  of  Commerce  to  take  up  the  work.  He  has  been  a  most  important  factor 
in  the  Portland  Chamber  of  Commerce,  as  well  as  in  the  State  Chamber,  of  which 
he  is  a  director.  He  was  one  of  the  first  to  realize  the  importance  of  encouraging 
and  building  up  tourist  travel  through  Oregon.  It  is  largely  through  his  efforts  that 
so  much  progress  has  been  made  along  this  line.  His  success  as  a  factor  in  Oregon's 
upbuilding   is  attributable   to   his   thorough   knowledge   of   the   state,   for   he  has   at   all 


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ALFRED   A.   AYA 


HISTORY  OP  OREGON  51 

times  been  a  conscientious  student  and  is  able  to  impart  his  fund  of  information  in 
a  way  that  commands  attention  and  interest.  He  is  a  clear,  logical  and  convincing 
speaker  and  at  various  times  he  has  written  for  different  publications.  He  seems 
to  see  at  a  glance  what  It  takes  most  men  a  long  time  to  comprehend  and  he  can 
picture  his  thoughts  and  observations  on  paper  in  a  clear  and  logical  manner. 

On  the  22nd  of  June,  1914,  in  Portland,  Mr.  Aya  was  married  to  Miss  Grace  M. 
Honeyman,  a  daughter  of  Thomas  D.  Honeyman,  president  of  the  Honeyman  Hard- 
ware Company,  and  they  have  become  parents  of  two  children:  Barbara,  born  April 
9,  1915;  and  Roderick  Honeyman,  born  September  17,  1916.  Mr.  Aya  is  a  stalwart 
republican  in  his  political  views  and  his  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Catholic  church. 
He  belongs  to  the  Knights  of  Columbus  and  has  membership  in  the  Waverly  Country 
Club,  the  Portland  Ad  Club,  the  Portland  Press  Club  and  the  North  Portland  Manu- 
facturers Club,  of  which  he  is  president.  He  has  been  quite  active  in  political  circles 
and  during  the  World  war  took  a  most  helpful  part  in  all  war  work.  His  splendid 
qualities  of  manhood  and  citizenship  have  won  him  admiration  and  high  regard  and 
everywhere  he   is  spoken  of  in  terms  of  confidence  and  respect. 


HON.  MELVIN  C.  GEORGE. 


Hon.  Melvin  C.  George  is  now  living  retired  In  Portland  but  for  many  years 
ranked  with  the  able  lawyers  and  jurists  of  the  state,  his  activity  at  the  bar  gaming 
him  a  prominence  that  made  him  the  peer  of  the  ablest  representatives  of  the  pro- 
fession in  the  northwest.  A  native  of  Ohio,  his  birth  occurred  near  the  village  of  Cald- 
well, in  Noble  county.  May  13,  1849.  He  is  a  son  of  Presley  and  Mahala  (Nickerson) 
George,  the  former  a  native  of  Loudoun  county,  Virginia,  while  the  latter  was  born 
In  Cape  Cod,  Massachusetts.  Both,  however,  were  reared  in  Ohio  and  both  were  de- 
scended from  old  Colonial  families  that  through  successive  generations  have  taken 
active  and  helpful  part  in  shaping  the  history  of  the  localities  with  which  they  have 
been  connected.  When  America  attempted  to  throw  off  the  yoke  of  British  oppression 
Jesse  George,  the  grandfather  of  the  Judge,  enlisted  with  the  Virginia  troops  under 
command  of  Captain  Radican  and  later  was  under  command  of  Captain  William 
George,  the  company  being  assigned  to  the  regiment  commanded  by  Colonel  Thomas 
Merriweather.  It  was  on  the  1st  of  September,  1778.  that  Jesse  George  joined  the  Con- 
tinental forces  and  he  continued  with  the  army  until  the  republic  was  permanently 
established.  He  afterward  made  a  journey  of  exploration  to  the  northwest  with  a 
company  of  Virginia  troops  and  was  so  pleased  with  the  country  through  which  he 
passed  on  his  campaign  that  he  determined  to  locate  west  of  the  Alleghany  mountains 
and  became  one  of  the  pioneer  residents  of  Ohio.  In  recognition  of  his  military  service 
he  was  granted  a  pension  of  thirteen  dollars  and  fifty  cents  per  year  by  Lewis  Cass, 
then  secretary  of  war,  and  there  is  now  in  possession  of  Judge  George  a  copy  of  an 
application  made  by  his  grandfather  for  an  increase  in  the  pension,  which  he  regarded 
as  inadequate  compensation  for  his  years  of  service  and  the  hardships  which  he  endured 
during  his  military  experience. 

When  quite  young  Presley  George,  father  of  the  Judge  accompanied  his  parents 
from  Virginia  to  Ohio  and  was  reared  in  the  latter  state.  There  he  wedded  Miss 
Mahala  Nickerson,  whose  father,  Colonel  Hugh  Nickerson,  was  born  In  Massachusetts 
in  1782  and  became  a  resident  of  Ohio  in  1809.  He  won  his  title  as  commander  of  a 
regiment  of  militia  in  the  second  war  with  England.  His  wife  bore  the  maiden  name 
of  Rebecca  Blanchard.  On  the  maternal  side  the  ancestral  line  can  be  traced  back  to 
an  early  period  in  American  history.  Colonel  Hugh  Nickerson  was  a  son  of  Thomas 
and  Dorcas  (Sparrow)  Nickerson  and  a  grandson  of  Thomas  Nickerson,  Sr.,  while  the 
latter's  father  and  grandfather  both  bore  the  name  of  William  Nickerson  and  the 
senior  of  that  name  was  the  founder  of  the  family  in  the  new  world,  having  sailed 
from  Norwich,  England,  on  the  ship  John  and  Dorothy,  which  dropped  anchor  in 
Boston  harbor  on  the  20th  of  June.  1637.  In  the  Sparrow  line  the  ancestry  is  traced 
back  to  Elder  William  Brewster,  who  came  to  the  new  world  as  one  of  the  Mayflower 
passengers  and  was  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Plymouth  colony.  Among  the  ancestors 
in  the  Sparrow  line  was  also  Governor  Thomas  Price  who  was  a  passenger  on  the  ship 
Fortune  which  reached  Plymouth,  Massachusetts,  in  1621  and  who  afterward  became 
governor  of  Plymouth  colony. 

While  Presley  George  and  his  wife  were  residents  of  Ohio  they  lost  five  of  their 


52  HISTORY  OF  OREGOX 

eight  children  by  scarlet  fever  and  diphtheria.  With  their  three  surviving  children  they 
soon  afterward  started  down  the  Ohio  river  and  made  their  way  to  St.  Joseph,  Mis- 
souri, where  they  secured  ox  teams  and  started  across  the  plains  for  Oregon.  They 
endured  many  hardships  and  privations  while  en  route  but  after  six  weary  months  of 
travel  reached  their  destination  and  for  several  weeks  were  encamped  at  East  Port- 
land, the  site  of  which  at  that  time  contained  but  three  houses.  Mr.  George  began 
farming  near  Lebanon,  in  a  heavily  timbered  district.  After  a  few  years  he  removed 
to  another  farm  in  the  same  locality  and  there  carried  on  general  agricultural  pursuits. 
He  passed  away  at  the  age  of  eighty-two  years  in  the  home  of  his  son,  Melvin  C. 
George,  and  his  wife  had  also  reached  an  equal  age  when  her  death  occurred  in  the 
home  of  her  son  Melvin  in  Portland.  They  were  both  consistent  followers  of  the  Baptist 
faith  and  Mr.  George  was  a  whig  in  early  manhood,  becoming  a  republican  following 
the  dissolution  of  the  former  party.  The  three  sons  of  the  family  who  survived  were: 
Hugh  N.,  who  became  a  teacher,  journalist  and  attorney  of  Albany,  Oregon,  and  in 
1864  served  as  presidential  elector  from  this  state,  carrying  the  vote  of  Oregon  to  the 
national  capital  in  support  of  Lincoln,  his  death  occurring  in  1871;  J.  W.,  who  passed 
away  in  Seattle  in  1895,  having  served  as  United  States  marshal  in  Washington  for  a 
period  of  seven  years;  and  Melvin  C,  of  this  review. 

The  last  named  has  for  a  quarter  of  a  century  been  the  only  surviving  member  of 
the  family.  He  was  very  young  at  the  time  the  long  journey  across  the  plains  was 
made  and  thus  becoming  identified  with  Oregon  in  its  formative  period  he  has  wit- 
nessed practically  its  entire  growth  and  progress,  nor  has  he  played  an  unimportant 
part  in  advancing  the  interests  and  shaping  the  destiny  of  the  commonwealth.  He 
supplemented  his  early  public  school  training  by  study  in  Santiam  Academy  and  in 
Willamette  University  and  in  early  manhood  became  a  teacher  in  the  academy  at  Jeffer- 
son, while  later  he  spent  a  year  as  principal  of  the  public  school  at  Albany.  Oregon. 
It  was  his  desire,  however,  to  become  a  member  of  the  bar  and  he  eagerly  availed  him- 
self of  every  opportunity  that  furthered  his  ambition  in  that  direction.  He  became 
a  law  student  in  the  office  of  Judge  Powell  at  Albany  and  afterward  pursued  his  reading 
under  the  direction  of  Colonel  Effinger  of  Portland.  When  he  had  qualified  for  active 
practice  he  opened  an  office  in  the  latter  city.  While  advancement  at  the  bar  is  pro- 
verbially slow,  no  dreary  novitiate  awaited  him.  He  soon  gave  demonstration  of  his 
powers  in  handling  involved  law  problems  and  his  practice  steadily  grew,  bringing 
him  into  connection  with  much  of  the  most  important  litigation  heard  in  the  courts 
of  the  district  and  of  the  state.  Further  recognition  of  his  superior  powers  came  to  him 
in  1897  when  Governor  Lord  appointed  him  to  the  circuit  court  bench  and  in  June, 
1898,  he  was  elected  judge  of  the  circuit  court  to  fill  out  an  unexpired  term  of  two 
years.  So  excellent  was  his  record  as  a  jurist  that  he  was  then  chosen  for  the  full 
term  of  six  years  and  according  to  a  contemporary  biographer,  "proved  himself  one 
of  the  ablest  jurists  who  have  presided  over  Oregon's  courts."  His  rulings  were  at  all 
times  strictly  fair  and  impartial  and  he  readily  related  the  points  at  issue  to  the  prin- 
cipals of  Jurisprudence.  In  various  fields  of  public  activity  Judge  George  has  ren- 
dered valuable  service  to  the  commonwealth.  He  has  long  been  recognized  as  one  of 
the  republican  leaders  of  Portland  and  of  the  state  and  in  1876  was  elected  a  member 
of  the  upper  house  of  the  general  assembly  for  a  four  years'  term  and  in  1880  was 
chosen  congressman  at  large  by  a  majority  of  thirteen  hundred  over  the  sitting  mem- 
ber. Governor  Whitaker.  He  took  his  seat  in  the  national  halls  of  legislation  in  March, 
1881,  and  by  reelection  served  during  the  forty-seventh  and  forty-eighth  congresses, 
acting  as  a  member  of  the  committees  on  commerce  and  revision  of  laws.  He  was  also 
instrumental  in  furthering  the  legislation  concerning  the  opening  of  the  Indian  reser- 
vation and  the  establishment  of  territorial  government  in  Alaska.  He  was  likewise 
active  in  securing  large  appropriations  for  Oregon,  including  the  commencement  of  the 
jetty  work  at  the  mouth  of  the  Columbia  river  and  the  payment  of  the  Modoc  Indian 
bill  of  one  hundred  and  thirty  thousand  dollars.  Declining  a  renomination  for  con- 
gress in  1884  he  resumed  the  practice  of  law,  in  which  he  continued  until  a  recent 
date.  He  is  now  living  retired  from  active  connection  with  the  profession,  spending 
a  large  portion  of  his  time  on  his  fruit  ranch,  being  the  owner  of  a  fine  commercial 
orchard  containing  a  variety  of  fruits  at  The  Dalles.  Thus  he  has  returned  to  a  place 
with  which  early  memories  of  the  family  in  Oregon  are  closely  associated,  for  when 
his  father  crossed  the  plains  with  his  wife  and  children  he  made  his  way  first  to  The 
Dalles  and  then  sent  his  wife  and  young  son  down  the  river  on  a  flatboat,  while  his 
other  two  sons  drove  the  team  over  the  Barlow  trail,  and  Mr.  George,  Sr.,  walked  the  en- 
tire distance,  following  the  river  to  Portland,  along  the  trail  of  what  is  now  the  noted 


HISTORY  OP  OREGON  53 

Columbia  River  Highway.  It  was  a  long  and  arduous  trip  and  he  was  obliged  to  camp 
by  the  wayside  at  night.  The  Indians  were  numerous  and  there  were  many  wild  ani- 
mals in  the  forests.  On  one  occasion  when  it  began  to  get  dark  he  saw  a  large  rock 
out  in  the  river.  He  felt  that  that  would  be  the  safest  place  to  camp,  so  he  took  off 
his  clothes,  tied  them  to  the  end  of  a  long  pole  in  order  to  keep  them  out  of  .the  water 
and  waded  out  to  the  rock,  where  he  remained  until  morning.  After  many  decades 
Judge  George  has  returned  to  The  Dalles  to  become  a  factor  in  the  development  and 
business  activity  of  that  section  of  the  state  although  still  retaining  his  residence  in 
Portland. 

It  was  in  Lebanon,  Oregon,  in  1872,  that  Judge  George  was  married  to  Miss  Mary 
Eckler,  a  native  of  Danville,  Illinois,  and  a  representative  of  one  of  the  old  families 
of  Kentucky.  Her  mother  passed  away  in  Illinois  and  later  the  family  started  for  the 
Pacific  coast.  While  en  route  the  father's  death  occurred  and  his  remains  were  interred 
on  the  present  site  of  Council  Bluffs,  Iowa,  in  1853.  Judge  and  Mrs.  George  became  the 
parents  of  three  daughters,  Florence,  Edna  and  Jessie,  the  eldest  being  a  graduate  of 
the  Fabiola  Hospital  and  Training  School  in  San  Francisco. 

Judge  George  is  a  well  known  representative  of  the  Masonic  fraternity  in  Oregon. 
He  belongs  to  Washington  Lodge,  F.  &  A.  M.;  Portland  Commandery,  K.  T.;  Portland 
Consistory,  A.  &  A.  S.  R.;  and  has  been  awarded  the  honorary  thirty-third  degree  in 
recognition  of  his  specific  service  to  Masonry.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Odd  Fellows 
Lodge  and  Encampment  and  has  held  many  offices  in  these  different  organizations. 
He  belongs  to  the  Oregon  Pioneer  Society,  the  State  Historical  Society,  the  Sons  and 
Daughters  of  Oregon  Pioneers  and  the  Oregon  Chapter  of  the  Sons  of  the  Revolution. 
He  has  long  been  an  honored  member  of  the  State  Bar  Association  and  his  valuable 
service  in  behalf  of  Portland  and  her  welfare  is  widely  acknowledged.  For  five  years 
he  was  a  member  of  the  school  board,  acting  as  its  president  during  two  years  of 
that  period.  He  also  served  as  chairman  of  the  board  of  bridge  commissioners  at  one 
time  and  was  instrumental  in  the  erection  of  the  Burnside  bridge  in  Portland.  He 
has  ever  occupied  a  position  of  leadership  in  regard  to  many  questions  which  have 
had  direct  effect  upon  the  upbuilding  and  welfare  of  the  city  and  of  the  state.  He  was 
a  Harding  and  Coolidge  presidential  elector'  for  Oregon.  He  is  an  advanced  thinker, 
broad  in  his  views,  sound  in  his  deductions,  his  analytical  trend  of  mind  being  mani- 
fest in  his  decisions  concerning  every  vital  matter. 


HAMPTON  B.   STOUT. 


The  life  record  of  Hampton  B.  Stout  spans  the  years  between  1853,  when  his  birth 
occurred  in  Ohio,  and  the  1st  of  August,  1920,  when  he  passed  away  in  Portland, 
Oregon.  He  had  for  many  years  been  prominently  identified  with  the  contracting  and 
building  business  in  this  city.  His  parents,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  William  Stout,  were  also 
natives  of  Ohio,  and  Hampton  B.  Stout  spent  his  youthful  days  in  that  state  and 
acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools.  He  afterward  removed  westward  to 
Kansas,  where  he  engaged  in  general  merchandising  in  connection  with  his  brother- 
in-law  for  several  years  and  later  became  a  resident  of  Denver,  Colorado,  where  he 
engaged  in  carpentering  and  in  the  contracting  business  for  a  number  of  years. 

It  was  in  1893  that  Mr.  Stout  came  to  Portland,  where  he  continued  in  the  building 
and  contracting  business.  Here  he  erected  many  important  structures,  including  the 
car  shops  in  Albina,  and  he  built  for  the  firm  of  Piatt  &  Piatt  many  buildings.  The 
excellence  and  thoroughness  of  his  work,  his  enterprise  and  his  reliability,  secured 
for  him  a  very  liberal  patronage  and  he  continued  his  building  operations  until  about 
eight  years  prior  to  his  death,  when  he  retired,  living  his  remaining  days  in  the  en- 
joyment of  well  earned  rest. 

Mr.  Stout  was  twice  married.  In  1904  his  first  wife  died,  leaving  a  son  and 
daughter,  Walter  and  Olive,  the  latter  the  wife  of  M.  Liberty.  In  1905  he  married 
Mrs.  Addie  Richards,  a  native  of  Topeka,  Kansas,  whence  she  was  brought  to  Oregon 
by  her  parents  in  1875.  They  traveled  by  rail  to  San  Francisco  and  then  by  boat  to 
Portland,  and  here  her  father,  Frank  Askland,  engaged  in  the  contracting  business, 
taking  contracts  for  street  railway  work  and  excavations  of  all  kinds.  In  young 
womanhood  his  daughter  Addie  became  the  wife  of  Fred  Richards,  and  to  them  were 
born  three  children:   Harry,  Ruth  and  Mildred.    The  daughter  Ruth  is  now  the  wife  of 


54  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

E.  S.  Boggs  of  Portland.     Mr.  Richards  passed  away  in  1S97  and  eight  years  later  Mrs. 
Richards  became  the  wife  of  Mr.  Stout. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Stout  was  connected  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of 
Elks,  also  with  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America  and  with  the  Artisans.  In  politics 
he  was  always  a  stalwart  republican  from  the  time  that  age  conferred  upon  him  the 
right  of  franchise  and  he  was  keenly  interested  in  public  affairs,  giving  his  aid  and 
influence  to  all  measures  for  the  general  good.  He  was  widely  recognized  as  a  man 
of  sterling  character,  reliable  in  business,  loyal  in  citizenship  and  devoted  to  the 
w-elfare  of  his  family,  and  by  reason  of  his  many  sterling  traits  he  was  held  in  high 
regard  by  all  who  knew  him. 


JUDGE  PETER  H.  D'ARCY. 


Judge  Peter  H.  D'Arcy,  a  distinguished  lawyer  and  jurist  of  Oregon  and  a  repre- 
sentative of  one  of  its  honored  pioneer  families,  has  spent  practically  his  entire  life 
within  the  borders  of  the  state,  having  been  brought  by  his  parents  to  Portland  when 
but  three  years  of  age.  He  is  well  known  throughout  the  Pacific  northwest  as  an 
eloquent  orator  and  able  lecturer  whose  services  are  much  in  demand  at  public  gath- 
erings. For  sixty-four  years  he  has  been  a  resident  of  Oregon,  being  numbered  among 
its  oldest  pioneers,  and  his  efforts  in  behalf  of  the  Pioneer  Champoeg  Memorial  Asso- 
ciation, of  which  he  is  president,  have  been  effective. 

Judge  D'Arcy  is  a  native  of  the  east.  He  was  born  in  Brooklyn,  New  York,  March 
4,  1S54,  a  son  of  Peter  and  Barbara  (O'Neil)  D'Arcy,  natives  of  Ireland,  the  former 
born  at  Gorey  in  County  Wexford,  and  the  latter  at  Cahersiveen.  in  County  Kerry. 
Both  emigrated  to  the  United  States  and  they  were  married  in  New  York,  going  to 
California  in  1855  by  way  of  the  Isthmus  of  Panama  and  settling  in  San  Francisco. 
The  father  was  a  carpenter  by  trade  and  he  there  engaged  in  business  as  a  builder  and 
contractor,  erecting  many  of  the  early  buildings  in  that  city.  In  1857  he  made  his 
way  to  Oregon,  taking  up  his  residence  in  Portland,  where  he  also  became  identified 
with  building  operations,  but  at  the  end  of  two  years  removed  to  Salem.  Here  he 
continued  to  follow  his  trade  until  his  retirement  from  active  business  pursuits  and 
his  demise  occurred  on  the  13th  of  April,  1895,  while  the  mother  passed  away  In  Salem 
on  the  25th  of  December.  1901. 

In  the  acquirement  of  an  education  Judge  D'Arcy  attended  private  schools  in  Salem, 
after  which  he  entered  Willamette  University,  where  he  pursued  a  classical  course, 
being  graduated  in  June.  1S74.  Desiring  to  become  a  member  of  the  legal  fraternity, 
he  took  up  the  study  of  law  with  Judge  J.  A.  Stratton  of  Salem,  and  upon  passing 
the  required  examination  was  admitted  to  the  bar  on  the  14th  of  December,  1876.  He 
at  once  engaged  in  practice  at  Salem  and  has  since  followed  his  profession  here,  winning 
a  foremost  place  as  a  lawyer  and  Jurist.  His  fellow  townsmen,  recognizing  his  worth 
and  ability,  called  him  to  public  office  and  in  1885  and  1886  he  served  as  municipal 
court  judge.  While  upon  the  bench  his  decisions  indicated  strong  mentality,  careful 
analysis,  a  thorough  knowledge  of  the  law  and  an  unbiased  judgment.  During  1891 
and  1892  he  filled  the  oflSce  of  mayor  of  Salem,  and  in  this  connection  also  he  made  a 
most  creditable  record,  giving  to  the  city  a  businesslike  and  progressive  administra- 
tion, his  influence  being  ever  on  the  side  of  advancement  and  improvement.  Judge 
D'Arcy  is  also  familiar  with  newspaper  work.  He  was  apprenticed  to  the  printing 
business  when  twelve  years  of  age  and  has  done  everything  in  connection  with  the 
publication  of  a  paper,  from  running  the  roller  of  the  old  Washington  hand  press  to 
writing  editorials,  working  on  both  the  Salem  Daily  Record  and  the  Statesman.  He 
Js  now  devoting  his  attention  to  his  law  practice,  which  has  become  extensive  and 
important. 

Judge  D'Arcy  is  a  member  of  the  Oregon  State  Historical  Society  and  he  likewise 
belongs  to  the  Pioneer  Association,  serving  as  president  of  the  latter  organization  in 
1910.  He  is  now  acting  as  president  of  the  Pioneer  Champoeg  Memorial  Association 
and  is  an  active,  earnest  worker  in  its  behalf.  After  fifteen  years  of  effort  he  suc- 
ceeded in  getting  the  appropriation  for  the  Pioneer  Memorial  building  at  Champoeg, 
Marion  county,  to  commemorate  the  meeting  of  the  pioneers  there  on  the  2d  of  May. 
1843,  when  it  was  decided  that  Oregon  should  become  a  part  of  the  United  States  of 
America.  This  building  was  erected  under  the  supervision  of  Judge  D'Arcy  and  George 
H.    Himes,    who    deserve    much    credit    for    their    untiring    efforts    in    this    connection. 


JUDGE   PETER   H.   D'ARCY 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  57 

The  Judge  is  a  most  forceful  and  eloquent  speaker  and  as  an  orator  and  lecturer  he 
has  become  well  known  throughout  the  northwest,  his  services  being  sought  for  many 
public  gatherings.  He  has  delivered  the  pioneer  addresses  at  many  cities  in  the  state, 
in  addition  to  lecturing  on  social  and  fraternal  matters,  and  at  a  banquet  in  San 
Francisco,  California,  on  the  28th  of  December.  1920,  in  honor  of  Senator-elect  Samuel 
M.  Shortridge,  a  boyhood  friend,  he  responded  to  the  toast.  On  this  occasion  he  asked 
if  any  of  the  assembled  guests  had  been  in  San  Francisco  on  the  22d  of  May,  1856, 
when  the  vigilantes  hanged  Cora,  and  found  that  he  was  the  only  real  pioneer  in  the 
gathering.  In  1894  he  delivered  the  Fourth  of  July  oration  at  Pendleton,  Oregon,  his 
friend,  Joaquin  Miller,  "the  poet  of  the  Sierras,"  composing  a  poem  for  the  occasion. 
Judge  D'Arcy  and  his  sister,  Teresa  E.,  reside  together  in  Salem,  and  for  more  than 
fifty  years  he  has  lived  on  Lot  1,  in  Block  1,  Ward  1,  and  Precinct  1.  His  has  been 
an  active  life,  filled  with  honorable  purpose  and  accomplishment.  Prom  pioneer  times 
he  has  resided  within  the  borders  of  Oregon  and  his  career  has  ever  been  such  as  has 
reflected  credit  and  honor  upon  the  state.  His  mind  is  stored  with  many  interesting 
incidents  of  the  early  days  and  forms  a  connecting  link  between  the  primitive  past 
with  its  hardships  and  privations  of  pioneer  life  and  the  present  with  its  progress 
and  prosperity.  He  has  ever  recognized  his  duties  and  obligations  in  regard  to  the 
public  welfare  and  has  cooperated  in  every  movement  that  tends  to  advance  the  inter- 
ests of  the  state  along  lines  of  permanent  good.  His  course  has  been  characterized  by 
integrity  and  honor  in  every  relation  and  commands  for  him  the  respect  and  goodwill 
of  all  with  whom  he  has  been  associated. 


CHARLES   E.   WOLVERTON. 


It  is  as  a  jurist  that  Charles  E.  Wolverton  is  most  widely  known,  though  he  has 
won  prominence  also  in  the  active  practice  of  the  law  and  in  the  educational  field.  He 
has  been  throughout  his  long  career  on  the  bench,  both  state  and  federal,  a  strong 
exponent  of  right,  and  Justice,  and  his  record  is  a  most  creditable  chapter  in  judicial 
history. 

Judge  Wolverton  was  born  in  Des  Moines  county,  Iowa,  May  16,  1851,  and  is  the 
son  of  John  and  Mary  Jane  (Nealy)  Wolverton.  The  Wolverton  ancestral  line  in  America 
is  traced  from  Charles  Wolverton,  who  came  from  Holland  to  this  country  about  1682 
and  settled  in  western  New  Jersey.  He  was  a  Quaker,  and,  according  to  family  tradi- 
tion, came  across  the  water  with  William  Penn.  He  was  a  native  of  England  but 
went,  with  others  of  his  persuasion,  to  Holland  to  escape  religious  persecution.  Daniel 
Wolverton,  the  great-grandfather  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  the  grandson  of 
Charles,  and  was  born  in  1739.  He  married  Hannah  Chamberlain,  two  years  his  junior. 
The  next  in  line  was  John  Wolverton.  born  June  24,  17S1,  whose  wife  was  Mary  Hoag- 
land,  born  April  4,  1790.  These  were  the  parents  of  Judge  Wolverton's  father,  John 
Wolverton,  who  first  saw  the  light  of  day  in  Hamilton  county,  Ohio,  December  4, 
1822,  and  who,  when  he  began  to  shift  for  himself,  drifted  westward  and  finally  set- 
tled in  Iowa. 

The  Nealys  are  of  Irish  extraction.  Mary  Jane  was  the  daughter  of  Samuel  S. 
Nealy,  a  veteran  of  the  War  of  1812,  and  Eliza  (Richards)  Nealy.  Samuel  S.  Nealy 
was  born  September  15,  1792,  and  his  wife  in  January  of  the  succeeding  year.  They 
were  married  December  24.  1811.  They  were  inhabitants  of  Steuben  county.  New  York, 
where  Mary  Jane  was  born  May  1,  1825.  When  she  was  but  thirteen  years  of  age 
they  sought  the  frontier  with  Iowa  as  their  destination.  Their  route  of  travel  was  by 
flatboat  down  the  Susquehanna  and  Ohio  rivers  and  thence  overland  to  Burlington.  It 
was  in  Iowa  on  November  24,  1847,  that  John  Wolverton  and  Mary  Jane  Nealy  were 
married.  In  1853  the  spirit  of  the  pioneer  impelled  them,  in  company  with  others,  to 
undertake  the  long  and  arduous  journey  across  the  plains,  then  a  wilderness,  and  over 
the  mountains  to  the  Willamette  valley.  They  settled  on  a  donation  land  claim  in  the 
southern  part  of  Polk  county  and  resided  there  for  many  years  but  finally  moved  to 
Monmouth.  They  were  consistent  members  of  the  Christian  church,  were  vitally  inter- 
ested in  educational  affairs,  and  earned  the  very  great  respect  and  esteem  of  those  with 
whom  they  became  associated.  John  Wolverton  was  successful  not  only  as  a  farmer 
but  in  business  life.  For  a  time  prior  to  the  Civil  war  he  was  in  the  employ  of  the 
general  government  as  a  carpenter  at  Fort  Hoskins   in  Benton   county,  where   he  saw 


58  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

much  of  General  Augur.     For  many  years  he  served  as  a  trustee  of  Christian  College 
at  Monmouth  and  a  portion  of  the  time  as  its  treasurer. 

To  be  reared  on  a  farm  is  often  a  wholesome  and  abiding  asset  for  a  boy.  It 
brings  him  in  touch  with  nature,  where  the  handiwork  of  the  divine  architect  is  re- 
vealed to  him,  and  he  imbibes  the  spirit  of  freedom  as  well  as  of  self-assertion  and 
senses  in  civil  affairs  the  soul  of  democracy.  Such  a  relationship  was  the  lot  and 
privilege  of  Judge  Wolverton,  and  the  country  schoolmaster  was  his  first  teacher.  His 
later  education  was  largely  acquired  at  Christian  College,  Monmouth,  under  Professor 
T.  F.  Campbell.  He  was  graduated  from  this  institution  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor 
of  Science  in  June,  1871,  and  with  that  of  Bachelor  of  Arts  in  June  of  the  following 
year. 

It  was  not  the  custom  then,  as  now,  for  the  boy  at  college  to  choose  a  major  subject 
and  to  pursue  it  as  the  basis  of  his  life  work.  Had  such  been  the  usage  in  Christian 
College  it  is  doubtful  whether  the  subject  of  this  article  would  have  chosen  the  law. 
The  study  of  languages,  of  mathematics,  of  philosophy,  logic  and  rhetoric  developed 
his  reasoning  faculties  with  the  result  that  the  law  was  finally  chosen  to  give  them 
scope.  He  then  entered  the  law  department  of  the  University  of  Kentucky,  at  Lex- 
ington, where,  in  addition  to  the  law,  he  studied  history  and  attended  Bible  classes 
under  Professors  Milligan  and  McGarvey.  In  February,  1S74,  he  was  graduated  from 
the  law  department  with  the  degree  of  LL.  B.  Later,  in  1898,  the  honorary  degree  of 
LL.  D.  was  conferred  upon  him  by  Willamette  University,  Salem,  Oregon.  On  his 
return  from  Kentucky,  he  entered  the  practice  of  the  law  at  Albany,  Oregon,  May  18, 
1874,  in  which  he  continued  for  slightly  more  than  twenty  years,  enjoying  substan- 
tial success. 

Judge  Wolverton  is  a  republican,  and  while  he  was  practicing  law  he  took  an 
active  and  prominent  part  in  politics,  attending  many  county  and  state  conventions. 
In  1892  he  was  elected  a  delegate  at  large  to  the  republican  national  convention  which 
met  at  Minneapolis,  Minnesota.  He  attended  the  convention  and  supported  William 
McKinley  as  presidential  nominee. 

Judge  Wolverton  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Clara  E.  Price,  the  daughter  of 
Nimrod  and  America  (Froman)  Price,  at  Albany,  Oregon,  October  3,  1878.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Price  were  pioneers  of  1851.  having  come  to  this  state  from  Danville.  Illinois. 
Nimrod  Price  was  born  in  Louisville.  Kentucky,  September  9,  1822.  of  Virginian  stock. 
His  ancestors  were  represented  in  the  Colonial  and  Revolutionary  wars,  and  in  the 
War  of  IS]  2.  He  was  prominent  in  politics  and  industrial  affairs.  His  wife,  who  was 
born  in  Dearborn  county,  Indiana.  March  12,  1S27,  was  a  granddaughter  of  a  Revo- 
lutionary soldier.  Major  Thomas  Rand,  and  was  a  woman  of  strong  character,  much 
beloved  by  her  family  and  friends. 

The  second  stage  of  Judge  Wolverton's  career  has  been  as  a  judge  on  the  bench. 
He  was  elected  a  justice  of  the  supreme  court  of  Oregon  in  June,  1894,  and  reelected 
in  June,  1900,  serving  continuously  from  the  first  Monday  in  July,  1894,  to  December 
5,  1905,  and  being  twice  chief  justice  during  that  period.  On  November  21.  1905.  he 
was  appoined  by  President  Roosevelt  as  United  States  district  judge  for  the  district 
of  Oregon,  took  the  oath  of  office  on  December  5th  following  and  is  still  serving. 
During  this  period  he  has  been  called  many  times  to  sit  in  the  circuit  court  of 
appeals.  Judge  Wolverton  shared  with  his  associates.  Justices  Robert  S.  Bean  and  Frank 
A.  Moore,  in  rendering  leading  and  important  opinions  of  the  supreme  court  of  Oregon, 
and  on  the  federal  bench  his  judicial  work  has  been  varied  and  important.  Among 
numerous  complex  matters  he  has  decided  is  the  celebrated  case  of  the  United  States 
against   the  Oregon   &  California   Railroad   Company. 

The  judge  on  the  bench  more  frequently  fails  through  a  deficiency  in  that  broad- 
mindedness  which  comprehends  the  details  of  a  situation  quickly  and  insures  complete 
self-control  than  from  any  other  cause.  The  judge  who  succeeds  in  the  discharge  of  the 
varied  and  delicate  duties  is  a  man  of  well  rounded  character,  finely  balanced  mind 
and  superior  intellectual  attainments,  and  that  Judge  Wolverton  is  so  regarded  is  uni- 
formly accepted.  His  decisions  indicate  strong  mentality,  careful  analysis,  a  thorough 
knowledge  of  the  law  and  an  unbiased  judgment. 

Judge  and  Mrs.  Wolverton  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church.  His  lodge 
affiliations  are  with  the  blue  lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  the  Royal  Arch  chapter,  and  Temple 
Commandery,  No.  3  of  Knights  Templar,  of  Albany.  He  served  as  grand  master  of  the 
Grand  Lodge  of  Oregon  in  1910-11,  and  has  done  much  to  further  the  cause  of  Masonry 
in  the  state.  For  many  years  he  has  been  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Order  of  United 
Workmen.     He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Oregon   Society  of  the  Sons  of  the  American 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  59 

Revolution.     Along   social   lines   he   has   connection   with    the   Arlington   Club   and    the 
Waverley  Country  Club. 

Judge  Wolverton's  activities  have  been  broad  and  varied,  touching  the  general 
interests  of  society  at  many  points.  He  was  chosen  an  elector  of  the  Hall  of  Fame  for 
Great  Americans  of  the  New  York  University  in  1900  and  served  in  1900  and  1905,  tak- 
ing part  in  the  selection  of  the  first  two  classes  to  receive  such  distinguished  honors. 
From  1912  to  1915  Judge  Wolverton  lectured  on  Federal  Procedure  in  the  law  depart- 
ment of  the  University  of  Oregon  and  in  the  Northwestern  College  of  Law  from  1915 
to  1920.  He  has  served  as  a  trustee  of  Albany  Collegiate  Institute,  of  Pacific  Uni- 
versity, Forest  Grove,  and  of  Reed  College,  Portland,  being  still  a  member  of  the  board 
of  the  last  named  institution.  Thus  is  presented  a  career  of  activity,  usefulness  and 
devotion  to  duty,  accompanied  by  a  generous  measure  of  success. 


GEORGE  WASHINGTON  ODELL,  M.  D. 

Among  the  best  known  of  Oregon's  pioneers  is  Dr.  George  Washington  Odell.  who 
has  now  passed  the  eighty-second  milestone  on  life's  journey.  He  was  born  October 
3,  1838,  in  Carroll  county,  Indiana,  and  is  a  son  of  John  and  Sarah  (Holman)  Odell, 
who  are  mentioned  more  at  length  in  connection  with  the  sketch  of  his  brother,  Wil- 
liam Holman  Odell,  on  another  page  of  this  work. 

George  Washington  Odell  spent  his  youthful  days  in  his  native  state,  there  attended 
a  private  school  and  after  the  removal  of  the  family  to  Oregon  during  his  youth  he 
spent  one  year  as  a  student  in  Willamette  University.  Later  he  entered  Santiam 
Academy  at  Lebanon,  Oregon,  and  pursued  his  studies  there  for  two  years.  In  1862 
he  took  up  the  study  of  medicine,  devoting  his  time  to  reading  textbooks  while  teaching 
school  at  Lebanon.  He  thus  qualified  for  the  onerous  and  responsible  duties  of  the 
profession  and  in  1865  began  practice.  He  followed  his  profession  for  six  years  in 
Lebanon  and  in  1870  removed  to  Eugene  where  he  continued  in  active  practice  until 
the  summer  of  1S79. 

On  the  5th  of  January,  1870,  Dr.  Odell  was  married  in  Corvallis,  Oregon,  to  Miss 
May  Biddle,  a  daughter  of  Dr.  Biddle.  Dr.  Odell  is  a  republican  in  his  political  views, 
having  supported  the  party  since  its  organization.  He  has  also  been  a  consistent  mem- 
ber of  the  Masonic  fraternity  since  1868.  Coming  to  the  northwest  when  the  work 
of  progress  and  civilization  seemed  scarcely  begun  in  this  section  of  the  country  he 
has  through  the  intervening  years  contributed  in  large  measure  to  the  progress  and 
upbuilding  of  Oregon  and  has  ever  been  numbered  among  its  honored  and  valuea 
citizens. 


HESSEL  SNELLER  BRAAKMAN. 

Hessel  Sneller  Braakman,  well  known  in  Hood  River  for  his  work  as  a  decorator, 
was  born  in  Holland  in  1876,  his  parents  being  Herschel  and  Beckley  (Sneller)  Braak- 
man, who  were  well-to-do  farming  people.  The  son  was  educated  in  Holland  up  to  the 
age  of  twelve  years,  when  his  father  suggested  that  he  become  a  seafaring  man  and 
learn  of  the  world  by  actual  contact.  This  plan  was  objectionable  to  the  son,  how- 
ever, so  he  packed  his  bag  and  left  home  with  the  determination  of  learning  a  trade. 
He  went  into  Germany  and  there  took  up  the  trade  of  interior  decorating  and  painting. 
He  found  the  work  entirely  to  his  liking  and  with  his  natural  aptitude  soon  made 
rapid  progress.  After  four  years'  apprenticeship,  in  which  he  became  thoroughly 
familiar  with  every  phase  of  the  business,  he  was  given  a  journeyman's  card.  He 
continued  to  work  for  his  instructor  until  his  nineteenth  year,  when  he  returned  to 
Holland  to  serve  for  three  years  in  the  army  according  to  the  laws  of  that  land.  When 
the  term  of  his  legal  military  service  was  ended  he  came  to  America  and  entered 
the  employ  of  a  firm  of  decorators  and  has  continued  in  this  line  of  work,  sometimes 
as  an  employe  and  often  as  a  contractor.  During  the  past  twenty-two  years  Jlr.  Braak- 
man has  worked  in  most  of  the  states  of  the  Union.  Examples  of  his  ability  ornament 
the  interiors  of  the  homes  of  such  well  known  citizens  as  Whitelaw  Reid  of  New  York, 
John  D.  Rockefeller's  country  home  in  the  White  mountains,  the  D.  G.  Bancroft  home 
Massachusetts,   the   Muldoon   health   farm    and   others,   including   the   Allen 


60  HISTORY  OF  OHEGOX 

and  the  Madrona  schools  and  tlie  juvenile  courthouse  at  Seattle,  Washington.  The 
First  National  Bank  of  New  Orleans  has  been  embellished  by  his  skill,  also  the  Union 
station  at  Memphis,  Tennessee,  is  an  example  of  his  taste  in   frescoing. 

After  traveling  all  over  Ameiica  Mr.  Braakman  was  married  in  Tacoma,  Wash- 
ington, in  1915  to  -Miss  Rhoda  Cooley,  a  daughter  of  Alfred  W.  Cooley,  a  retired  lum- 
berman. Following  his  marriage  he  decided  to  settle  down  to  a  quiet  home  life  and 
selected  Hood  River  as  his  future  place  of  residence.  Here  he  established  himself  and 
soon  built  up  a  fine  business.  His  skill  is  not  only  manifest  in  the  costly  adornment 
and  artistic  frescoing  of  the  mansion  of  the  multi-millionaire — a  line  in  which  he 
excels — but  also  in  the  handsome  homes  and  orchard  bungalows  of  the  well-to-do 
people  of  central  Oregon,  who  are  warm  in  their  praise  of  a  man  who  knows  his  busi- 
ness from  every  angle  and  who  gives  the  same  satisfaction  in  a  job  that  brings  him 
only  a  hundred  dollars  that  he  does  in  one  the  contract  price  of  which  reaches  a  hun- 
dred thousand  dollars.  In  a  word  he  is  most  thorough  and  painstaking  and  at  all 
times   perfectly   reliable. 

Mr.  Braakman  is  an  Odd  Fellow,  having  joined  the  order  in  Manchester,  Eng- 
land, when  a  young  man.  He  is  a  thoroughgoing  American  in  all  of  his  ideas  and  while 
familiar  with  a  number  of  countries  on  the  face  of  the  globe  and  with  many  sections 
of  the  United  States,  he  finds  more  pleasure  in  Hood  River  with  its  splendid  natural 
beauties,  furnished  by  the  rich  valley  lands  and  majestic  snow-capped  mountains, 
than  he  has  ever  found  in  any  other  section  of  the  world. 


SPENCER  SETH  BULLIS. 


Spencer  Seth  Bullis,  railroad  builder,  miner,  lumber  dealer  and  president  of  the 
Rogue  River  Valley  Canning  Company,  has  in  these  and  various  other  fields  of  activity 
established  his  position  as  one  of  the  builders  of  the  great  state  of  Oregon,  for  his 
enterprises  have  always  been  of  a  character  that  have  contributed  to  public  progress 
as  well  as  to  individual  advancement.  He  has  been  most  careful  in  formulating  his 
plans  and  determined  in  their  execution,  and  when  one  avenue  of  opportunity  has  seemed 
closed  he  has  carved  out  other  paths  whereby  to  reach  the  desired  goal. 

Mr.  Bullis  was  born  at  East  Aurora,  New  York,  in  1S49,  and  for  more  than  a  half 
century  he  has  been  a  human  dynamo,  still  running  strong.  He  comes  from  sturdy 
stock  on  both  sides.  His  parents  were  Seth  M.  and  Mary  (Scott)  Bullis.  his  ancestors 
in  the  paternal  line  having  come  to  America  in  1630.  His  grandfather  was  a  tool 
maker  who  settled  in  northern  New  York  early  in  the  history  of  development  in  that 
state. 

Spencer  S.  Bullis  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  his  native  county  and 
in  the  East  Aurora  Academy  and  the  Fort  Edward  Collegiate  Institute.  When  a 
youth  of  nineteen  years  he  went  to  the  Oil  Creek  district  of  Pennsylvania  but  soon 
found  that  fortune  was  slow  in  coming  his  way.  He  then  turned  his  attention  to  the 
shingle  business  and  when  he  was  twenty-one  years  of  age  his  father  gave  him  a 
thousand  dollars,  which  he  invested  in  a  sawmill.  It  was  about  that  time  that  he 
was  offered  a  position  as  selling  agent  at  Buffalo  with  a  large  lumber  concern — a 
position  which  l^e  accepted — and  from  1876  until  1893,  or  for  a  period  of  seventeen 
years,  he  handled  an  immense  amount  of  lumber  of  his  own  and  other  manufacturers 
throughout  the  middle  and  New  England  states.  He  also  handled  hemlock  bark  for 
several  years  and  was  the  largest  shipper  to  the  New  England  tanneries.  During 
this  period  he  organized  and  managed  as  president  the  Pennsylvania  Lumber  Storage 
Company,  which  was  a  system  of  pooling  lumber  interests.  This  was  a  great  success 
and  did  an  immense  business  until  the  timber  of  that  territory  became  largely  ex- 
hausted. Always  advancing,  never  retreating,  he  built  the  Gulf  &  Ship  Island  Rail- 
road, a  system  of  two  hundred  and  fifty  miles  extending  south  from  Jackson,  the 
capital  of  Mississippi,  and  terminating  at  Gulfport.  Mississippi,  with  terminals  and 
docks  there.  This  soon  became  the  second  lumber  exporting  port  on  this  continent. 
He  was  vice  president  and  general  manager  of  the  railroad  until  1901,  when  he  dis- 
posed of  his  interests.  In  1904  he  went  to  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  and  for  several 
years  had  interests  there  in  connection  with  tlie  docks  and  terminals  around  that 
city  and  also  in  copper  mines,  having  sold  to  the  Brittania  Company,  the  Empress  group, 
w^hich  now   constitutes   a   considerable   part   of   their   properties   which   are   among   the 


SPENCER   SETH   BULLIS 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  63 

large  ones  of  the  continent.  During  all  the  time  up  to  1914  he  had  his  residence  at 
Olean,    New    York,    which    was    his    business    headquarters,    rearing    his    family    there. 

In  1914  Mr.  Bullis  located  in  Medford,  Oregon,  and  was  soon  In  the  front  rank 
of  its  progressive  business  men.  He  took  up  mining  and  now  owns  and  operates  the 
Sterling  mine,  the  oldest  and  largest  placer  mine  in  this  gold  territory.  He  organized 
the  Southern  Oregon  Lumber  Company,  of  which  he  is  now  the  treasurer,  and  he  estab- 
lished the  Rogue  River  Valley  Canning  Company,  of  which  he  is  the  president.  He 
likewise  built  the  electric  line  from  Medford  to  Jacksonville,  which  is  now  a  part 
of  the  Medford  Coast  Railroad.  Quickly  recognizing  needs  and  opportunities,  he  has 
put  forth  effort  to  meet  these  needs  and  in  so  doing  has  given  to  the  public  valuable 
business  service,  while  his  labors  have  brought  substantial  financial  returns. 

Mr.  Bullis  was  married  to  Miss  Sarah  Eliza  Potter,  a  daughter  of  Gilbert  Potter, 
a  member  of  one  of  the  old  colonial  families.  He  became  a  farmer  of  northern  New 
York,  occupying  a  tract  of  two  hundred  and  fifty  acres  that  has  been  in  possession 
of  the  family  since  1805.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bullis  have  been  born  the  following  named: 
Martha  A.,  who  is  the  wife  of  Ralph  Boutelle,  a  native  of  Fitchburg,  Massachusetts, 
and  connected  with  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution;  Gilbert  Potter,  a  lawyer  and 
cotton  planter  of  Louisiana;  Raymond  S.,  a  resident  of  Whittier,  California,  where 
he  is  engaged  in  oil  production;  Helen  M.,  living  in  Medford;  Seth  M.,  superintendent 
of  the  California  Oregon  Power  Company;  and  Gardiner,  living  at  Los  Angeles,  Cali- 
fornia. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Bullis  is  a  Mason  and  an  Elk,  and  his  religious  faith  is  indicated 
in  his  membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church.  Though  past  the  allotted  span  of  three 
score  years  and  ten,  he  is  still  active  and  at  his  desk  for  eight  hours  every  working 
day.  His  life  has  been  an  active  and  useful  one,  his  labors  far-reaching  and  resultant, 
and  his  enterprise  has  brought  him  prominently  to  the  front. 


JOHN  D.   BOOST. 


Stronger  than  all  else  in  the  life  of  most  men  is  the  insistent  call  of  country. 
Few  are  the  individuals  who  would  not  sacrifice  even  life  to  patriotic  duty  and  there- 
fore the  great  World  war  claimed  the  services  of  four  million  American  men,  several 
thousand  of  whom  were  called  upon  to  make  the  supreme  sacrifice.  Among  this  num- 
ber was  John  D.  Boost  who  was  a  most  highly  esteemed  and  valued  young  business 
man  of  Portland,  in  which  city  he  had  many  warm  friends.  He  was  born  in  Detroit, 
Michigan,  September  6,  1885,  a  son  of  Charles  and  Maria  (Vyse)  Boost,  who  in  the 
year  1886  left  Michigan  and  made  their  way  with  their  family  to  California,  where 
they  resided  for  a  few  years  and  then  came  north  in  1891,  to  Portland,  Oregon,  in  which 
city  the  father  established  the  Portland  Wire  &  Iron  Works.  After  his  son  John  reached 
adult  age  he  assisted  the  father  in  this  business  which  they  conducted  for  several 
years,  or  until  it  was  sold  in  1908. 

In  the  meantime  John  D.  Boost  had  acquired  a  good  education  in  the  schools  of 
Portland  and  had  thus  qualified  for  life's  practical  and  responsible  duties.  Virtually 
his  entire  life  was  passed  on  the  western  coast  and  he  was  imbued  with  the  spirit  of 
western  enterprise  and  progress  which  has  been  the  dominant  factor  in  this  section 
of  the  country.  After  his  association  with  his  father  in  the  conduct  of  the  Portland 
Wire  &  Iron  Works  he  continued  with  the  firm  that  succeeded  to  the  business  until 
1911  and  then  joined  J.  M.  McAuIey  in  organizing  the  Reliance  Wire  &  Iron  Works. 
They  opened  a  plant  which  they  operated  until  1918.  and  in  the  meantime  built  up  a 
substantial  business  of  gratifying  proportions,  making  theirs  one  of  the  important 
productive  industries  in  the  city  with  a  liberal  patronage.  In  1918,  however,  Mr.  Boost 
put  aside  all  business  and  personal  considerations  and  enlisted  to  serve  in  the  World 
war,  at  which  time  the  business  of  the  Reliance  Wire  &  Iron  Works  was  consolidated 
with  that  of  the  Northwest  Fence  &  Supply  Company. 

In  the  meantime  Mr.  Boost  was  married,  in  1907,  to  Miss  Adeline  Gilstrap,  a  daugh- 
ter of  J.  R.  and  Caroline  (Aubel)  Gilstrap,  who  were  natives  of  Missouri  and  came 
to  Oregon  at  an  early  day.  The  father  was  engaged  in  the  salmon  packing  industry 
for  many  years  and  was  widely  known  in  that  connection.  After  America  entered  the 
World  war  Mr.  Boost,  feeling  that  his  first  duty  was  to  his  country,  enlisted  in  the 
Fourth  Company  of  the  Fourth  Battalion  in  the  Central  Officers  Training  Camp  at 
Little  Rock,  Arkansas,  and  there  becoming  ill,  passed   away   on   the   3d   of  November, 


64  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

1918,  thus  giving  his  life  as  a  sacrifice  to  the  cause  of  world  democracy.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity,  belonging  to  Sunnyslde  Lodge,  and  he  gave  his 
political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party.  At  all  times  he  stood  for  those  things 
which  are  best  in  the  life  of  the  individual  and  of  the  community  at  large,  and  at  his 
passing  he  left  behind  him  many  stanch  friends,  for  practically  his  entire  life  had  been 
spent  in  Portland  and  he  had  a  wide  acquaintance  in  the  city,  enjoying  the  warm 
regard  of  all  with  whom  he  had  been  brought  into  contact. 


MRS.  JUNE  MacMILLAN  ORDWAY. 

Mrs.  June  MacMillan  Ordway,  who  has  been  called  "Oregon's  first  war  mother," 
is  also  well  known  as  one  of  the  honored  pioneer  daughters  of  the  state.  To  hun- 
dreds of  thousands  outside  of  Oregon  she  is  known  through  her  writings  and  there 
are  few  who  have  done  as  much  to  make  the  beauties  of  Oregon  known  to  the  world 
as  has  Mrs.  Ordway.  Her  parents  were  among  the  early  settlers  of  the  state  and  in 
one  of  the  new  log  cabins  that  marked  the  onward  march  of  progress — a  little  cabin 
situated  on  the  Tualatin  plains — she  was  born  September  11,  1855.  A  contemporary 
writer  has  said:  "She  was  one  of  a  family  of  nine  children,  a  quiet,  dreamy  child, 
one  to  whom  the  noisy  sports  of  youth  made  little  appeal.  She  was  thoughtful  and 
earnest,  and  in  her  very  early  girlhood  seemed  to  give  much  consideration  to  the 
serious  things  of  life  and  to  plan  for  the  future.  She  was  but  six  years  of  age  when 
three  of  her  little  brothers  passed  from  life  within  a  very  few  days  and  the  little  girl 
became  more  quiet  and  thoughtful  than  before.  Many  sorrows  have  since  come  into 
her  life,  but  they  have  never  embittered  her,  having  on  the  contrary  developed  that 
broad  sympathy  which  finds  its  best  expression  only  in  those  who  have  passed  through 
the  more  difficult  experiences." 

When  a  young  girl  Mrs.  Ordway  played  a  small  organ  in  the  Hassalo  Street  Con- 
gregational church  of  Portland,  a  church  that  was  organized  in  a  small  schoolhouse  on 
the  property  known  as  MacMillan's  addition  to  Portland  and  donated  to  the  congre- 
gation by  her  mother.  There  every  Sunday  morning  June  MacMillan  could  be  found, 
playing  an  organ  that  belonged  to  a  neighbor  and  was  carried  by  its  owner  with  the 
assistance  of  a  friend  to  the  church.  This  organ  had  originally  been  brought  from 
Maine  to  Portland  and  was  one  of  the  first  musical  instruments  of  the  kind  in  the 
city.  When  quite  young  June  MacMillan  became  the  wife  of  Julius  Ordway,  a  native 
of  Maine,  who  passed  away  in  1909,  and  the  greatest  sorrow  of  her  life  has  come  to 
her  in   the  loss   of  her  children,  two  beautiful,   gifted   boys,   Eliot   and   Earl. 

Mrs.  Ordway  had  not  passed  from  girlhood  into  maidenhood  when  she  began  to 
express  herself  in  writing,  and  one  of  her  teachers,  discovering  her  great  talents  and 
becoming  interested  in  her  work,  had  a  little  story  and  verse  published  in  a  Salem 
(Ore.)  paper.  She  was  twelve  years  of  age  when  she  first  received  remuneration  for 
her  verse,  which  was  accepted  and  paid  for  by  a  New  York  publication.  Once  when 
very  young,  after  one  of  her  quiet,  thoughtful  days,  when  sitting  in  the  midst  of  the 
family  circle,  she  suddenly  said  that  she  was  going  to  be  a  "writer  lady"  when  she 
grew  up.  This  created  much  merriment  in  the  household  and  the  sensitive  nature  of 
the  child  shrank  from  that  misunderstanding  which  is  often  harder  to  bear  than 
active  hostility.  She  cherished  her  little  verses,  however,  and  many  a  time  hid  her 
writings  away  in  some  secret  place,  fearing  they  would  be  lost.  Her  education  was 
in  large  measure  acquired  through  her  own  efforts  and  her  studious  nature  inclined 
her  to  the  perusal  of  all  the  volumes  which  she  could  procure.  From  the  earliest 
reception  of  her  verse  to  the  present  time  except  during  the  several  years  that  fol- 
lowed the  death  of  her  children  when  her  health  was  weakened  by  grief,  she  has 
continued  her  writing,  finding  in  literary  pursuits  that  expression  of  the  inner  self 
which  the  painter  puts  upon  his  canvas  or  the  sculptor  chisels  in  marble.  She  is  the 
author  of  the  play  "Oregon."  together  with  several  other  plays,  and  her  writings  include 
many  songs,  poems  and  stories.  Long  since  she  has  established  her  position  in  the  world 
of  letters  and  among  her  treasures  are  written  words  of  congratulation  and  encourage- 
ment from  the  late  President  McKinley,  Marcus  Hanna  and  Lillian  Whiting.  When 
Ella  Wheeler  Wilcox  visited  Portland  a  few  years  ago  she  gave  Mrs.  Ordway  great 
encouragement,  telling  her  to  let  nothing  discourage  her  in  her  writings.  Among  her 
most  beautiful  production;;  are  three  dedicatory  odes  written  for  the  unveiling  of  mili- 
tarv  monuments   in  her  native  state.     One  of  these,  entitled   "Muffled   Drums."   was  for 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  65 

the  unveiling  of  the  monument  at  Hubbard,  Marion  county,  erected  by  the  ex-soldiers 
of  that  county.  For  the  monument  erected  in  Lone  Fir  cemetery,  Portland,  her  poem 
was  entitled  "After  the  Battles,"  this  being  erected  by  the  citizens  to  the  memory  of 
those  who  fell  in  the  llexican,  Civil,  Indian  and  Spanish-American  wars.  The  last  and 
grandest  of  the  three  monuments  was  erected  in  Portland,  on  which  occasion  her  poem 
was  entitled  "After  Taps."  Her  son,  Eliot  W.,  was  one  of  the  brave  boys  of  Company 
H,  Second  Oregon,  iu  the  Spanish-American  war  and  died  at  sea  of  typhoid  fever,  near 
Manila,  September  24,  1898,  at  the  age  of  nineteen  years.  His  company  was  called  the 
"flower  of  Oregon,"  being  composed  mostly  of  high  school  boys  of  good  families  and 
refined  homes.  Mrs.  Ordway  inherits  her  mother's  charitable  instincts  and  has  assisted 
many  less  fortunate  than  herself.  Like  many  other  kindly  disposed  people  she  has  been 
greatly  imposed  upon  at  times,  but  her  heart  never  closes  its  doors  against  the  appeal 
of  the  needy  and  when  the  possibility  of  rendering  material  assistance  is  hers,  she  does 
it  with  ready  hand.  Fortune  has  not  always  smiled  upon  her  path,  but  in  the  darkest 
hours  she  has  ever  remembered  her  mother's  teachings  concerning  virtue  and  honesty. 
She  has  been  spoken  of  by  the  press  as  "Oregon's  sweetest  singer"  and  "Oregon's  own" 
and  her  writings  have  been  a  splendid  medium  in  making  the  world  acquainted  with 
the  beauties  and  opportunities  of  the  northwest.  It  was  but  natural  to  a  woman  of  Mrs. 
Ordway's  disposition  and  her  broad  interests  that  she  should  enter  actively  into  the 
war  work  when  America  joined  the  allied  forces  in  the  effort  to  bring  about  world 
democracy  and  again  her  great  sympathy  found  expression  in  poetic  form,  one  of  her 
beautiful   poems,   "After  Taps,"  being  herewith  given: 

'Twas  calm  and  fair  in  the  Maytime, 

The  air  with  blossoms  sweet. 
Filled  our  hearts  with  peace  and  gladness 

That  made  our  joys  complete. 

And  the  sun  shone  o'er  the  valley. 

O'er  village,  shore  and  town. 
Rich  promise  of  fair  frultfulness 

Seemed  all  the  West  to  crown. 

Hark!   hark!   on  that  fair  May  morning 

A  deafening  sound  did  rise. 
And  then  a  cloud  so  black  and  deep 

Did   darken   God's  clear  skies. 

And  dimmed  was  the  morning's  brightness. 

A  call   came  from  afar — 
To  arms!   to  arms!  hold  high  the  flag, 

Protect  each  stripe  and  star! 

Changed  was  the  scene  of  sweet  content. 

To  one  of  sighs  and  fears. 
As  mothers  bade  their  brave  young  sons 

Farewell,  thro'  blinding  tears. 

Away  in  that  war-dimmed  country 

They  marched  with  firmest  tread, 
Amid  scenes  of  fiercest  battle, 

'Mid  dying  and  the  dead. 

0  young  heroes  of  our  "Homeland!" 

Your  lives  were  true  and  tried! 
The  West  is  made  more  glorious 

Because  you  thus  have  died. 

Ah!   some  were  lost  amid  the  strife. 

Kind  Father,  they  are  thine. 
And  when  the  roll  is  called  in  heaven 

They  will  be  there  iu  line. 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

They  gave  their  lives  for  freedom  here 

And  rest  beneath  the  sod. 
They  gained  a  life  of  honor  there 

Forevermore  with   God. 

This  monument  as  sentinel 
Shall  through  the  ages  stand, 

Bearing  the  names  of  those  who  died 
Brave  soldiers  of  our  land. 


RICHARD  HENRY  PARSONS. 

Richard  Henry  Parsons,  cashier  of  the  bank  of  Sherwood  and  one  of  the  most 
and  influential  citizens  of  that  city,  was  born  in  1S71,  the  son  of  William 
W.  and  Phoebe  E.  (Walton)  Parsons.  His  paternal  ancestors  date  back  to  the  year 
1634  when  Joseph  Parsons  came  to  America  and  he  is  recorded  as  one  of  the  witnesses 
to  a  transfer  of  the  land  upon  which  the  city  of  Springfield,  Massachusetts,  now  stands. 
The  transfer  was  made  by  the  Indians  to  William  Pychon  and  others.  This  was  six- 
teen years  after  the  coming  of  the  pilgrims  and  six  years  after  the  first  Boston  set- 
tlement. In  1647  he  is  recorded  as  one  of  the  forty-two  owners  of  Springfield.  He 
was  chosen  selectman  in  1651  and  1655  and  with  others  purchased  a  large  tract  of  land 
upon  which  Northhampton  is  now  located.  In  1672  he  became  a  member  of  the  first 
"troop  of  horse"  in  Massachusetts  and  in  1678  is  recorded  as  a  member  of  the  Ancient 
and  Honorable  Artillery  of  Boston.  He  fought  in  King  Philip's  war  and  in  other  wars 
of  his  time.  His  son  Joseph  was  born  in  Springfield  in  1647  and  was  a  captain  in  the 
Hampshire  regiment,  selectman,  judge  of  the  county  court  and  representative  to  the 
general  court  at  Boston.  Joseph  had  a  son  Daniel  who  became  a  very  wealthy  man 
and  held  several  prominent  offices  including  that  of  selectman.  His  son  Aaron  moved 
to  Wilbraham  and  fought  bravely  in  the  French  war  in  1755-56.  He  was  one  of  the 
oflScers  in  the  battle  of  Lake  George  and  among  his  comrades  who  were  killed  was 
Noah  Grant,  the  grandfather  of  the  American  hero  and  president.  Ulysses  S.  Grant. 
His  son,  Eli,  was  a  soldier  in  the  Revolution,  serving  as  a  lieutenant  in  the  continental 
army  from  1776  to  17S0.  He  was  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Cherry  Vale  Academy, 
having  moved  to  New  York  state  where  he  was  known  as  Col.  Parsons.  His  son, 
Richard  Henry,  came  to  Oregon  in  the  very  early  days  and  long  before  the  tide  of 
emigration  set  in  crossed  the  plains  and  mountains  in  the  primitive  prairie  schooner 
drawn  by  oxen.  Little  is  recorded  of  his  movements  in  Oregon,  but  his  son,  William 
W.  Parsons,  lived  in  Eugene  and  died  there  about  1873. 

His  son.  Richard  Henry  Parsons,  was  born  in  Eugene  in  1S71.  He  is  a  worthy 
descendant  of  Joseph  Parsons  whose  progeny  have  distinguished  themselves  in  many 
states  of  the  union  as  lawyers,  doctors,  clergymen,  business  men  and  soldiers.  One  of 
the  family.  General  Lewis  B.  Parsons,  is  accredited  with  saving  Missouri  to  the  Union 
in  1861  while  another  was  governor  general  of  the  northwest  territory  in  the  days 
before  the  great  middle  west  was  divided  into  states.  All  of  the  Parsons  family  have 
demonstrated   that   "blood   will  tell." 

After  the  death  of  his  father  Richard  Henry  Parsons  moved  with  his  mother  to 
the  town  of  Creswell  where  he  grew  to  manhood.  He  was  educated  at  the  grade  and 
high  school  at  Creswell  and  after  working  at  various  pursuits  for  a  number  of  years  he 
established  himself  in  the  mercantile  business  at  the  age  of  twenty-six,  and  continued 
in  this  work  until  1914.  when  he  disposed  of  his  stock  and  for  three  years  was  man- 
ager of  a  farmers'  warehouse  at  Redmond.  He  became  cashier  of  the  First  National 
Bank  of  Redmond  and  in  1919  went  to  Sherwood  and  accepted  the  position  of  cashier 
of  the  Bank  of  Sherwood,  which  office  he  still  holds.  Since  locating  in  this  place 
Mr.  Parsons  has  shown  his  progressive  spirit  by  his  active  interest  in  his  new  town. 
Mr.  Parsons  owns  the  handsome  brick  building  in  which  the  bank  is  located.  There 
are  also  three  stores  in  this  building,  while  the  upper  portion  of  it  is  devoted  to 
a  hotel  which  far  surpasses  the  average   small   town   hotel. 

Mr.  Parsons  was  married  in  Creswell  in  1893.  to  Miss  Nettie  M.  McDaniel,  daugh- 
ter of  J.  L.  McDaniel,  a  California  pioneer  farmer.  They  are  the  parents  of  three 
children:  Walton  W.  Parsons,  a  young  man  of  much  promise,  who  is  assistant  pro- 
fessor of  pharmacy  in  the  Oregon  Agricultural  College;    Lucille,  an   expert  accountant 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  67 

who  is  a  graduate  of  the  University  of  Oregon  and  assistant  cashier  of  the  Bank   of 
Sherwood;    and   Clair,   who   is   attending   school   in    Sherwood. 

Mr.  Parsons  is  the  president  of  the  Sherwood  Commercial  Club  and  present 
mayor  of  Sherwood  and  during  his  stay  in  Creswell  was  mayor  of  that  city  and  presi- 
dent of  the  Creswell  Commercial  Club.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Masons,  the  Eastern 
Star,  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  and  the  Woodmen  of  the  World,  in 
which  latter  organization  he  has  filled  all  the  chairs.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Parsons 
are  active  members  of  the  Methodist  church  and  teachers  of  the  Sunday  school.  That 
the  Parsons  family  is  a  valuable  asset  to  Sherwood   is  generally  conceded. 


ALFRED  A.   HAMPSON. 


Alfred  A.  Hampson,  member  of  the  Portland  bar,  whose  experience  as  an  attorney 
covers  thirteen  years  and  has  been  of  wide  scope,  thus  developing  his  powers  in  many 
branches  of  the  law,  was  born  in  Washington,  D.  C,  in  1882.  His  father,  Thomas 
E.  Hampson,  was  a  native  of  Newburgh,  New  York,  born  in  1S49,  and  in  Washington 
he  married  Martha  R.  Hale  whose  birth  occurred  in  Charlestown,  Massachusetts.  The 
death  of  Mr.  Hampson  occurred  in  1886  and  he  is  still  survived  by  his  widow,  who  is 
now  a  resident  of  Portland. 

Alfred  A.  Hampson  attended  high  school  in  Washington  and  was  graduated  in 
1906  from  the  Stanford  University  of  California  with  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree, 
the  scene  of  his  activities  changing  from  the  Atlantic  to  the  Pacific  coast.  In  April 
of  the  same  year  he  came  to  Portland  and  for  seven  years  was  in  the  office  of  Fred 
V.  Holman  as  a  law  student  and  later  as  assistant.  In  1907  he  was  admitted  to  the 
bar  and  in  1917  entered  into  partnership  with  Benjamin  C.  Dey,  while  in  1918  they 
were  joined  in  a  partnership  relation  by  R.  C.  Nelson,  under  the  firm  style  of  Dey, 
Hampson  &  Nelson.  Their  practice  is  a  growing  one  and  Mr.  Hampson  has  already 
gained  a  position  at  the  Portland  bar  which  indicates  that  his  future  career  will 
be  well  worth  watching. 

In  September,  191S,  Mr.  Hampson  responded  to  the  call  to  the  colors,  enlisting 
as  a  private  in  the  Twenty-fourth  Company,  Central  Machine  Gun  Officers'  Training 
School.  He  served  until  November  30.  1918,  resigning  soon  after  the  signing  of  the 
armistice.  He  then  resumed  his  practice  and  aside  from  his  connection  with  the 
Portland   bar   is   a   director  of  the  Oregon-California   Railroad   Company. 

In  June.  1917,  in  San  Francisco,  Mr.  Hampson  was  married  to  Ethel  McQuaid 
Stevenson  and  they  are  parents  of  a  daughter,  Patricia  and  a  son,  Alfred  A.,  Jr. 
Politically  Mr.  Hampson  is  a  democrat  and  fraternally  he  is  a  Master  Mason,  while 
in  club  circles  he  is  well  known  as  a  member  of  the  Arlington  and  University  Clubs. 
He  stands  as  a  high  type  of  American  manhood  and  citizenship  and  the  sterling 
worth  of  his  character  is  recognized  by  all,  while  his  ability  has  brought  him  to  a 
creditable  position   in   legal   circles. 


JAMES  ULYSSES  CAMPBELL. 

Judge  James  Ulysses  Campbell  is  one  of  the  most  prominent  men  of  his  pro- 
fession in  Oregon  City  and  Clackamas  county,  and  to  this  position  he  has  risen  by  his 
own  unaided  efforts.  He  was  born  in  Prince  Edward's  Island,  Canada,  in  1866.  a 
son  of  John  and  Mary  (McDongall)  Campbell,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Scotland 
and  came  to  America  with  their  parents  when  they  were  children. 

Judge  Campbell  was  reared  amid  beautiful  home  surroundings  and  received  his 
education  in  the  home  schools  and  at  the  Prince  of  Wales  College.  He  resided  on 
the  family  farm,  teaching  school  and  assisting  with  the  farm  work  until  he  was 
twenty  years  of  age  when  he  decided  to  come  to  the  United  States  and  become  a 
citizen  of  this  country.  Following  his  desire  with  action  he  first  located  at  Denver, 
Colorado,  where  he  secured  employment  with  the  Denver  &  Rio  Grande  Railroad. 
He  remained  in  Denver  for  a  while  but  being  ambitious  and  anxious  for  advancement, 
he  went  to  Nevada  where  he  worked  in  the  mines  and  at  the  smelters  for  some  time. 
In  1888  he  came  to  Oregon  and  located  at  Oswego,  where  he  obtained  employment  in 
an   iron  works  and  worked  steadily  for  five  years.     He  then   removed  to  Oregon  City, 


68  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

and  having  previously  taken  up  the  study  of  law,  was  admitted  to  the  practice  of 
his  chosen  profession  in  the  fall  of  1S93,  and  was  soon  brought  to  public  notice  by 
his  Scotch  fearlessness  and  tehacity.  He  was  interested  in  politics  and  espoused 
the  cause  of  the  republican  party.  Being  a  direct,  forceful  and  magnetic  speaker. 
Judge  Campbell  soon  became  prominent  in  the  affairs  of  that  organization.  For 
several  years  he  was  the  aggressive  chairman  of  the  county  central  committee  and 
in  1904  was  a  delegate  to  the  Republican  National  Convention.  His  success  as  a 
lawyer  was  fast  becoming  recognized  and  subsequently  in  1902  he  was  made  deputy 
district  attorney,  which  position  he  filled  with  ability  for  tour  years.  In  1907  Judge 
Campbell  was  elected  to  the  legislature  and  was  reelected  in  190S.  In  1909  he  was 
appointed  judge  of  the  fifth  judicial  district,  in  1910  was  elected  to  that  position  and 
was  reelected  in  1916.  On  becoming  judge,  he  relinquished  all  his  political  activity, 
believing  that  the  ermine  should  be  divorced  from  politics.  His  success  as  a  judge 
may  be  attributed  largely  to  his  Scotch  ideas  and  doggedness  in  attending  strictly  to 
the  matters  in  hand  whatever  they  might  be,  and  his  decisions  have  seldom  been 
reversed  by  the  supreme  court.  There  is  another  chapter  in  the  life  of  Judge  Campbell, 
that  relative  to  his  war  record.  For  three  years  he  served  in  the  Oregon  National 
Guard  and  during  the  Spanish-American  war  served  as  a  member  of  the  Second 
Oregon  United  States  Volunteers.  He  accompanied  his  regiment  to  the  Philippines 
and  has  the  distinction  of  being  the  only  enlisted  man  in  the  Second  Oregon  Vol- 
unteers who  was  promoted  from  the  ranks  to  a  first  lieutenancy,  returning  to  Oregon 
with  the  rank  of  first  lieutenant. 

A  portion  of  his  success  may  be  attributed  to  his  wife,  who  has  ever  encouraged 
and  helped  him.  She  was,  before  her  marriage,  Miss  Annie  C.  Pauling,  a  daughter 
of  Charles  Pauling.  Her  father  is  a  native  of  Missouri  and  in  1S83  settled  in  Oregon, 
and  is  now  one  of  the  most  prominent  and  highly  respected  farmers  in  the  Willamette 
valley.  To  the  union  of  Judge  and  Mrs.  Campbell,  one  child,  Mary  A.,  was  born. 
She  is  an  attractive  young  woman  and   is  a  student   at  the   Oregon   City  high   school. 

Judge  Campbell  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity,  of  the  Elks,  and  though 
a  man  of  genial  and  pleasant  disposition  he  has  devoted  most  of  his  time  to  his 
profession,  thinking  that  of  more  importance  than  his  fraternal  affiliations.  Judge 
Campbell's  sturdy  character,  legal  ability,  and  tenacity  of  purpose  have  brought  him 
into  prominence  among  the  lawyers  of  his  community.  He  has  ever  discharged  his 
duties  with  marked  ability  and  his  reputation  as  an  upright,  careful  arbiter  has 
won  him  friends  among  his  opponents  of  earlier   days. 


I 


EDGAR  OSCAR  DOUD. 


Edgar  Oscar  Doud,  whose  highly  developed  powers  in  the  practice  of  law  gained 
him  recognition  as  one  of  the  prominent  members  of  the  Portland  bar,  was  born  in 
Livingston  county.  New  York,  December  9,  1835,  and  had  reached  the  age  of  fifty-six 
years  when  he  was  called  to  his  final  rest.  His  parents  were  Orlean  and  Lucinda  B. 
Doud,  also  natives  of  the  Empire  state.  The  son  acquired  his  education  in  Lima 
College  and  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal  Seminary  of  Livingston  county.  New  York. 
It  was  while  a  student  there  that  he  met  Miss  Delia  A.  Thayer,  who  was  graduated 
on  the  25th  of  June,  1S60,  from  the  same  institution  and  on  the  following  day  she  be- 
came the  bride  of  Mr.  Doud.  The  next  year  the  Civil  war  was  inaugurated  and  three 
of  Mr.  Doud's  brothers  joined  the  Union  army,  so  that  he  was  compelled  to  remain 
at  home  to  care  for  his  parents.  He  taught  school  through  the  winter  months  and 
in  the  summer  seasons  engaged  in  the  cultivation  of  a  small  farm  in  the  Empire  state. 
Following  the  conclusion  of  the  war  he  went  to  Penfleld,  New  York,  where  he  again 
taught  school  and  while  thus  engaged  he  also  took  up  the  study  of  law  at  Rochester 
under  the  direction  of  Hiram  Parker.  At  a  later  period  he  went  to  Syracuse,  New 
York,  and  was  there  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1876. 

In  the  following  year  Mr.  Doud  started  for  Oregon,  crossing  the  continent  to  San 
Francisco,  California,  and  thence  proceeding  by  boat  to  his  destination.  From  that 
time  forward  he  and  his  wife  continuously  resided  in  Oregon  and  he  was  closely 
associated  with  the  development  and  interests  of  Portland  for  many  years.  At  first 
he  purchased  the  merchandise  establishment  of  Newell  &  Lane  and  conducted  the  store 
for  about  two  years.  He  then  sold  out  and  engaged  in  the  wharf  business,  being 
associated  with  others  under  the  firm  style  of  Doud.  Newell  &  Sliker.     They  established 


EDGAR   O.   DOUD 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  71 

a  wharf  at  the  foot  of  East  Oak  street  in  May,  1882,  this  being  the  first  wharf  on 
the  east  side.  Eventually  Mr.  Doud  disposed  of  his  interest  in  that  business  and 
opened  a  law  office  in  connection  with  Newton  McCoy  on  the  east  side,  at  Grand  avenue 
and  East  Oak  street,  where  he  remained  in  practice  until  his  death.  He  built  up  a 
very  large  practice  and  was  well  known  throughout  the  state  as  an  able  lawyer — one 
who  found  ready  and  correct  solution  for  the  intricate  and  involved  problems  of  law. 
In  1890  Mr.  Doud  erected  a  palatial  residence  at  No.  1472  East  Morrison,  then 
one  of  the  finest  homes  of  the  city  and  still  one  of  Portland's  attractive  residences. 
He  was  one  of  the  chief  factors  in  the  upbuilding  of  East  Portland,  his  efforts  contribut- 
ing in  large  measure  to  the  development  of  this  section  of  the  city.  He  was  identified 
with  no  social  organizations  nor  clubs  but  was  loyal  in  all  matters  of  progressive 
citizenship  and  cooperated  in  many  activities  of  great  value  and  benefit  to  the  com- 
munity.    He  passed  away  at  his  home  at  Mount  Tabor,  April  25,  1891. 


KENNETH  ALEXANDER  JAMES  MACKENZIE,  M.  D. 

"Wherever  this  good  man  went,"  wrote  one  of  Dr.  Kenneth  A.  J.  Mackenzie's 
friends,  "he  laid  strong  hold  on  the  heart  of  everyone  who  came  into  personal  con- 
tact with  him."  Such  was  an  estimate  of  the  man  who,  while  a  most  eminent  physi- 
cian and  surgeon,  never  lost  that  human  sympathy  which  is  so  often  overshadowed 
by  scientific  investigation  and  knowledge.  Hundreds  of  his  fellow  physicians  loved 
him  as  a  brother  and  to  the  entire  city  of  Portland  and  the  state  at  large  the  news 
of  his  death  carried  a  sense  of  personal  bereavement.  He  was  born  at  Cumberland 
House,  in  Manitoba,  Canada,  January  13,  1S59,  a  son  of  Roderick  and  Jane  Mackenzie, 
the  latter  a  daughter  of  another  Roderick  Mackenzie.  The  father  was  born  in  Ros- 
shire,  Scotland,  and  after  crossing  the  Atlantic  became  a  chief  factor  with  the  Hudson 
Bay  Company. 

In  the  acquirement  of  his  education  Dr.  Mackenzie  early  was  a  student  at  The 
Nest,  an  academy  at  Jedburgh,  Scotland,  and  he  also  attended  school  at  Montreal, 
Canada.  Later  he  became  a  student  in  the  Upper  Canada  College  at  Toronto,  and 
prepared  for  his  professional  career  as  a  medical  student  in  McGill  University  in 
that  city,  there  winning  the  degrees  of  M.  D.  and  C.  M.  in  the  year  1881.  In  the 
following  year  he  again  went  abroad  and  received  from  the  University  of  Edinburgh, 
Scotland,  the  degrees  of  L.  R.  C.  P.  and  L.  R.  C.  S.  At  a  subsequent  period  he  did 
postgraduate  work  in  Europe,  attending  the  universities  of  London,  Berlin,  Paris 
and  Vienna.  He  initiated  his  professional  experience  in  Portland  in  1882  and  to 
the  time  of  his  death  remained  a  most  successful  and  honored  practicing  physician 
of  this  city.  He  always  held  to  the  highest  standards  of  his  profession  and  as  the 
years  passed  concentrated  his  attention  more  and  more  largely  upon  surgery.  Medical 
men  point  with  admiration  to  his  achievements  in  nerve  grafting  and  in  delicate 
stomach  operations  and  upon  the  foundation  which  he  built  in  nerve  grafting  some 
astounding  developments  were  made  during  the  recent  World  war.  A  year  afte. 
his  arrival  in  Portland  he  became  a  member  of  the  staff  of  St.  Vincent's  Hospital  and 
a  little  later  was  made  a  surgeon  of  the  Oregon -Washington  Railway  &  Navigation 
Company  and  was  soon  advanced  to  the  position  of  chief  surgeon,  continuing  as  such 
from  1S95  until  1920.  He  not  only  served  as  chief  of  staff  of  St.  Vincent's  Hospital 
in  Portland  but  was  also  at  the  head  of  the  Portland  Free  Dispensary,  was  consulting 
surgeon  of  the  port  of  Portland,  was  medical  aid  to  the  governor  of  Oregon  from 
1912  until  1919  and  occupied  other  positions  of  professional  prominence,  which  came 
to-  him  in  recognition  of  his  high  attainments  as  a  practitioner  of  medicine  and 
surgery.  He  was  regarded  as  one  of  the  most  eminent  educators  in  the  profession 
and  from  1887  until  1906  was  professor  of  theory  and  practice  of  medicine  in  the 
University  of  Oregon  medical  school  and  from  1906  until  1920  was  professor  of  opera- 
tive and  clinical  surgery.  In  1913  he  was  made  dean  of  the  faculty  and  so  continued 
until  1920.  His  great  ambition  was  to  make  Portland  a  medical  center  of  the  north- 
west and  as  dean  of  the  University  of  Oregon  he  was  the  recognized  leader  in  the 
rapid  development  of  that  institution.  There  was  never  a  time  when  a  call  came  to 
Dr.  Mackenzie  for  professional  service  to  which  he  did  not  make  prompt  and  ready 
response.  He  was  made  the  head  of  the  Oregon  Relief  Corps  at  the  time  of  the  Saii 
Francisco   earthquake   and   fire   in    1906,  serving   under   General   Torney,    U.    S.   A.     He 


72  .  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

was  also  one  of  the  directors  and  the  medical  director  of  the  Lewis  and  Clark  Ex- 
position in  Portland  and  was  state  chairman  of  the  medical  section  of  the  Council 
of  National  Defense  from  1916  until  1919.  In  1917  he  was  made  state  chairman  of 
the  American  Red  Cross.  He  was  in  close  connection  with  many  leading  scientific 
societies  and  was  honored  with  the  vice  presidency  in  1906-7  of  the  American  Medical 
Association  of  which  he  was  long  a  fellow.  He  had  membership  in  the  International 
Surgical  Association;  was  a  fellow  of  the  American  College  of  Surgeons:  and  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Portland  Academy  of  Medicine  of  which  he  was  president  in  1909-10.  He 
likewise  had  membership  in  the  City  &  County  Medical  Society,  serving  as  president 
thereof  in  1915:  belonged  to  the  State  Medical  Association  of  which  he  was  also 
president  in  1915;  and  had  membership  in  the  American  Medical  Association  and 
the  North  Pacific  Surgical  Association  wlijch  called  him  to  its  presidency  in  1919. 
He  was  a  member  of  the  American  Thoracic  Society  and  state  chairman  of  the  Ameri- 
can Society  for  the  Control  of  Cancer.  His  scientific  researches  and  investigations 
carried  him  to  a  point  that  few  reach.  Outside  of  the  actual  work  of  his  practice 
he  was  probably  best  known  through  his  efforts  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  medical 
college  of  the  University  of  Oregon.  In  this  connection  he  acquired  a  large  campus 
for  the  medical  school  and  established  the  school  as  the  nucleus  of  a  medical  center, 
the  growing  influence  of  which   is  felt  throughout  the  entire  west. 

Dr.  Mackenzie  was  married  in  Portland,  Oregon,  to  Cora  Hardy  Scott,  a  daughter 
of  Pliny  Hardy,  of  Opelousas,  Louisiana,  who  was  a  prominent  lawyer  and  at  one  time 
secretary  of  state  of  Louisiana.  Mrs.  Mackenzie  passed  away  in  1901  and  Dr.  Mackenzie 
later  was  married  in  Spokane  to  ilarion  Higgins  Brown,  who  departed  this  life  in  1916. 
His  children  were  four  in  number:  Ronald  Seaforth;  Jean  Stuart;  Barbara,  the  wife 
of  Roderick  Lachlan  Macleay;   and  Kenneth  A.  J.,  Jr. 

On  the  15th  of  March,  1920,  the  life  labors  of  Dr.  Mackenzie  were  terminated  by 
death.  It  may  well  be  said  that  he  gave  his  life  to  the  profession.  He  would  not  cease 
his  labors  even  when  the  condition  of  his  health  warned  him  of  a  needed  rest.  In  the 
war  period,  although  nearly  sixty  years  of  age,  he  responded  to  the  call  of  the  colors 
and  took  active  part  in  war  work.  He  received  a  commission  as  captain  in  the  Medical 
Corps  and  had  charge  of  the  recruiting  of  physicians  for  medical  work  in  the  army 
throughout  this  district,  at  the  same  time  supervising  home  medical  service.  The  con- 
stant demands  made  upon  his  energies  by  reason  of  his  professional  service  in  active 
practice  and  his  devotion  to  the  interests  of  the  medical  college  were  the  direct  cause 
of  his  demise.  At  the  time  of  his  death  Mayor  Baker  said:  "His  passing  is  a  loss  to 
the  community.  He  was  the  moving  factor  and  spirit  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  Oregon  medical  school  here.  It  was  his  heart's  desire  to  establish  here  one 
of  the  great  medical  schools  of  the  west — a  desire  that  now  is  nearing  realization.  He 
was  a  very  able,  clean  and  high  class  citizen  and  the  work  he  so  wisely  directed  must 
be  carried  on  along  the  plans  which  he  laid  down."  One  who  knew  him  well  wrote 
of  him:  "Always  we  have  been  admonished  to  speak  nothing  but  good  of  the  dead. 
Concerning  Dr.  Mackenzie  nothing  but  good  can  be  spoken.  What  power  was  it  that 
enabled  him  without  the  least  effort  to  bind  the  affection  of  men  and  women  so  firmly 
that  the  tie  became  tighter  as  time  went  on?  I  have  been  trying  to  fathem  it  and  my 
only  conclusion  is  that  he  was  endowed  with  an  exceptionally  large  share  of  the  divine 
gift.  We  know  others  who  have  broad  human  sympathy,  but  where  can  you  point  to 
another  friend  or  new  worthy  acquaintance  who,  unconsciously,  touched  your  better 
nature  the  moment  you  came  into  his  presence?  His  was  a  rare  gift,  and,  oh,  whai 
generous  use  he  made  of  it! 

"Think  of  all  the  men  you  know  who  have  risen  to  high  place  in  this  community. 
Can  you  recall  another  in  whom  was  combined  such  strength  and  yet  such  gentleness 
of  character?  In  his  presence  you  could  not  help  but  feel  he  was  the  master,  but  he 
exerted  mastery  without  the  appearance  of  exerting  it :  you  could  not  help  but  yield 
to  the  moral — or  shall  I  say — the  spiritual  force?  In  manner  he  was  simple  and  un- 
affected as  a  child.  Light  danced  in  his  eyes  and  smiles  played  about  his  lips;  yet 
he  had  lion  hearted  courage  and  he  always  fought  on  the  side  of  right. 

"Himself  entirely  free  from  deceit.  Dr.  Mackenzie,  I  am  sure,  believed  there  was 
less  deception  in  mankind  than  actually  exists.  Himself  straightforward,  he  so  be- 
lieved others.  If  I  have  read  him  aright  he  had  the  power  to  bring  out  and  he  did 
bring  out  the  better  traits  of  character  in  those  who  came  under  his  influence.  They 
tried  to  live  up  to  his  estimate  of  them.  Because  he  believed  the  world  is  better  than 
it  is  perhaps  he  got  more  happiness  out  of  life  than  most  men  have  found.  I  know 
that  the  world  is  better  for  his  having  lived  in  it. 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  73 

"What  was  there  inherent  in  Dr.  Mackenzie  that  made  people  revere  him.  Other 
physicians  have  great  slvill  equal  to  his,  a  similar  kindliness,  the  same  devotion  to  their 
calling,  strong  human  sympathy  and  high  ethical  ideals  and  professional  standards,  but 
in  some  way  they  fall  short  of  winning  the  exalted  station  that  Dr.  Mackenzie  held 
and  it  is  not  easy  to  give  a  sound  reason.  My  own  view  is  that  Dr.  Mackenzie,  with 
all  his  other  equipment,  won  the  higher  place  through  his  great-heartedness  and  uu- 
selfishness,  united  with  a  spiritual  quality  that  no  one  may  dare  to  analyze. 

"Literally  thousands  of  Portland  people  loved  Mackenzie;  yes,  loved  him.  No  other 
word  can  express  their  sentiment.  While  very  few  of  them  could  tell  him  of  their 
deep  affection  in  words  they  still  could  show  it  in  other  ways  and  I  imagine  that  the 
good  Doctor  was  conscious  of  it  and  because  of  that  wealth  of  affection  he  had  exceed- 
ingly rich  rewards." 

One  of  the  Portland  papers  wrote  of  him:  "That  life  is  long,"  said  the  poet, 
"which  answers  life's  great  end."  "Dr.  Kenneth  A.  J.  Mackenzie  was  sixty-one  years  of 
age,  but  he  had  lived  a  full  life.  The  memory  which  goes  back  for  nearly  forty  years 
does  not  recall  the  time  when  Dr.  Mackenzie  was  not  in  the  front  rank  of  his  profes- 
sion. As  a  very  young  man  he  brought  to  the  practice  of  medicine  and  surgery  an 
extraordinary  insight  into  the  causes  of  disease,  a  mature  judgment  as  to  the  remedy 
and  a  highly  trained  skill  as  to  its  application.  He  had  singular  graces  of  manner, 
which  were  the  outward  marks  of  a  wholesome  and  altogether  lovable  personality;  and 
he  acquired  easily  the  complete  confidence  of  his  patients  and  of  all  others  who  knew 
him.  There  are  families  in  Oregon  to  whom  Dr.  Mackenzie  had  ministered  through 
three  decades  and  more.  From  first  to  last  he  was  their  physician,  counselor  and 
friend." 

Another  Portland  paper  said  editorially:  "For  thirty-eight  years  Dr.  Kenneth  A. 
J.  Mackenzie  was  a  part  of  the  community  life  of  Portland  and  in  recent  years  he 
played  an  eminent  part.  In  his  untimely  death  the  community  suffers  a  tangible  loss 
whose  extent  can  scarcely  be  measured. 

"Professionally  Dr.  Mackenzie  ranked  with  the  highest  and  it  is  a  matter  of  com- 
munity pride  that  he  developed  his  superior  skill  here.  Fresh  from  college,  equipped 
with  the  best  of  training,  ambitious,  energetic,  self-confident  but  modest,  his  heart  over- 
flowing with  the  milk  of  human  kindness,  he  began  his  life's  work  among  the  people  of 
Portland  and  rose  steadily  to  his  place  of  eminence.  He  loved  his  profession  and  made 
constant  and  well  directed  effort  to  raise  its  standards. 

"Of  Dr.  Mackenzie's  public  service  his  work  during  the  war  stands  out  most  promi- 
nent. He  was  not  only  chairman  of  the  American  Red  Cross,  but  medical  aide  to  the 
governor  of  Oregon.  Into  these  duties  he  threw  his  limitless  energy  and  among  other 
big  things  went  in  person  to  every  section  of  the  state  to  establish  the  medical  organ- 
ization. When  the  history  of  Oregon  in  the  war  comes  to  be  written  Dr.  Mackenzie's 
name  will  not  be  undistinguished. 

"Dr.  Mackenzie  was  an  exemplar  of  his  noble  profession  and  of  the  finest  citizenship 
and  he  was  an  inspiration  to  American  youth.  He  died  too  young.  At  sixty-one  a 
physician  is  at  his  prime  and  even  after  his  working  days  are  over  he  is  most  valuable 
as  a  teacher  and  consultant.  To  his  worth  as  a  man  of  science  he  added  exalted  char- 
acter.    Such  men  are  rare  and  the  community  is  poorer  when  they  are  taken  awa). 

A  fitting  and  well  deserved  tribute  was  paid  to  Dr.  Mackenzie  by  The  Spectator, 
under  the  heading,  "Shall  We  Not  Carry  On  His  Work?"  and  which  reads  as  follows: 

"We  did  not  know  how  much  we  admired  and  loved  Dr.  Kenneth  A.  J.  Mackenzie, 
or  how  much  we  owed  him,  until  the  shock  of  the  news  of  his  death  awoke  us  to  the 
knowledge  of  how  dear  he  was  to  us  and  what  an  important  part  he  had  in  the  com- 
munity's affairs.  We  lived  so  close  to  him  so  long  and  were  so  constantly  within  the 
radiance  of  those  personal  charms  that  so  greatly  endeared  him  to  us,  that  we  never 
realized  how  great  he  was  in  his  profession  or  how  untiring  and  unselfish  in  the 
public  service.  And  now  we  hear  from  afar  off  that  the  wisest  and  most  learned  in 
the  profession  that  he  adorned  were  proud  to  call  him  master;  that  his  contributions 
to  science  had  given  life  to  many  who  had  walked  in  the  shadow;  and  that  the  wonder- 
ful buildings  on  the  campus  of  the  medical  school  of  the  university  are  monuments 
to  his  remarkable  genius  for  work,  organization  and  accomplishment. 

"Dr.  Mackenzie  had  a  deep  sympathy  for  the  suffering;  a  great  love  for  his  fellow- 
man.  He  was  a  successful  physician  because  he  loved  to  heal;  a  successful  surgeon 
because  he  loved  to  restore.  Probably  he  cured  as  many  of  his  patients  by  the  remark- 
able faith  they  had  in  him  as  by  the  medicines  he  gave  them.  Sympathetic,  gentle, 
gracious,  and  strong  and  robust,  when  he  entered  a  sick  room  the  ailing  patient  said: 


74  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

'Well,  Doctor,  here  I  am,  down  and  almost  out.  Fix  me  up'— and  having  perfect  faith 
in  Dr.  Mackenzie,  the  sick  thought  no  more  of  themselves  at  all  and  speedily  recovered. 

"For  a  long  time  Dr.  Mackenzie  had  stood  within  the  shadow  that  enveloped  him 
on  Monday  night.  Had  he  followed  the  advice  he  would  have  given  a  patient  in  similar 
condition  he  would  have  put  aside  some  of  his  work  and  relieved  the  strain  on  his 
heart.  But  things  had  to  be  done.  Dean  of  the  medical  school  of  the  University  of 
Oregon,  he  had  a  dream  of  a  great  medical  foundation  here  in  Portland  that  would 
rival  any  of  the  world's  finest  institutions  of  healing.  Through  the  warm  friendship 
of  J.  D.  Farrell,  president  of  the  Oregon-Washington  Railroad  &  Navigation  Company, 
he  obtained  the  valuable  site;  by  tireless  effort  and  aided  by  other  friends,  money  was 
obtained  and  the  nucleus  of  the  foundation  was  started.  Then  came  the  war  and  Dr. 
Mackenzie  volunteered,  and  despite  his  age — almost  sixty — and  because  of  his  splendid 
abilities,  got  a  commission.  He  worked  well  for  his  country  and  poorly  for  himself; 
his  strength  was  drained;  recurring  attacks  of  sickness  followed;  and  at  last  the  over- 
taxed heart  ceased  to  beat. 

"Dr.  Mackenzie  was  a  good  and  useful,  a  lovable  and  beloved  citizen.  It  is  for  us 
to  say  whether  or  not  he  has  gone,  or  if,  by  our  carrying  on  that  splendid  work  he 
began  he  is  to  remain  with  us  as  an  inspiration  and  guide.  The  medical  center  was 
started  by  him;  let  us  build  on  it  and  still  build  on  it,  until  we  have  reared  there  the 
great  institution  that  he  planned — as  a  fitting  monument  to  Kenneth  Mackenzie." 


CHESTER  ARTHUR  SHEPPARD. 

Chester  Arthur  Sheppard,  accorded  a  position  of  distinction  in  the  ranks  of  the 
legal  fraternity  of  Portland,  has  in  his  life  record  proven  the  fact  that  success  is  not 
a  matter  of  fortunate  circumstances  nor  of  genius,  as  held  by  some,  but  is  the  out- 
come of  clear  judgment,  determination,  careful  preparation  for  the  work  in  hand 
and  that  keen  discernment  which  enables  the  individual  to  recognize  and  separate 
the  essential  from  all  the  incidental  or  accidental  circumstances.  Born  on  a  farm 
near  Grand  Forks,  North  Dakota,  June  28,  1879,  he  was  reared  in  the  school  of  hard 
knocks.  His  parents  were  William  Edward  and  Orpha  Esther  Sheppard,  the  former 
of  Irish  and  German  lineage  and  the  latter  of  English  and  Scotch  descent.  His 
father  followed  agricultural  pursuits  and  conditions  on  the  large  home  farm  made  it 
necessary  for  the  son  to  assist  in  its  cultivation  from  the  time  he  was  old  enough  to 
follow  a  team,  so  that  the  age  of  thirteen  found  him  with  only  two  years  of  schooling. 
When  fourteen  years  of  age  he  left  the  farm  and  entered  the  high  school  at  Fremont, 
Michigan,  being  graduated  therefrom  in  1S97.  He  was  a  student  in  the  Ferris  Institute 
at  Big  Rapids,  Michigan,  in  the  summers  of  1S96,  1S97  and  1898  and  in  the  following 
year  entered  the  Michigan  State  Normal  College  at  Ypsilanti,  which  he  attended  until 
the  close  of  the  school  year  of  1901.  He  won  a  teacher's  life  certificate  and  in  post- 
graduate work  in  1905  won  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Pedagogics.  Desirous  of  be- 
coming a  member  of  the  bar,  he  pursued  a  course  in  connection  with  the  Chicago 
Correspondence  School  of  Law  from  19'05  until  1908.  Meanwhile  Mr.  Sheppard  had 
done  successful  work  in  teaching,  spending  three  years  as  a  teacher  in  rural  schools 
in  order  to  obtain  money  to  finish  his  education.  He  was  also  superintendent  of  the 
schools  of  Quinnesec,  Michigan,  for  two  years  and  during  1906  and  1907  had  charge 
of  one  of  the  Chicago  parental  schools  for  the  instruction  of  incorrigible  boys. 

In  the  fall  of  1907,  having  made  up  his  mind  to  cast  in  his  lot  with  the  far  west, 
he  came  to  Portland,  arriving  in  this  city  with  a  cash  capital  of  two  hundred  and 
sixty-seven  dollars,  of  which  two  hundred  dollars  was  borrowed  money.  He  entered 
the  night  classes  of  the  law  school  of  Oregon  University,  engaging  in  teaching  rapid 
calculation  at  the  Portland  Business  College  during  the  day,  and  in  1908  was  graduated 
from  that  institution  with  the  LL.  B.  degree.  He  also  served  for  one  year  as  principal 
of  the  Creston  public  school  and  following  his  admission  to  the  Oregon  bar  in  the 
spring  of  1908  he  immediately  entered  upon  the  practice  of  his  profession  in  Port- 
land, where  he  has  since  resided  and  during  the  intervening  period  has  won  a  liberal 
clientage,  his  business  in  the  courts  constantly  increasing  in  volume  and  importance. 
His  leaning  is  toward  constructive  work  in  the  law  and  he  numbers  among  his  clients 
some  of  the  largest  corporations  and  firms  in  Oregon.  Activity  in  debating  societies 
during  his  later  school  years,  in  whjch  he  won  several  oratorical  contests,  and  expe- 
rience on   the  lecture  platform   in   northern   Michigan  made  him  a   ready  and   forceful 


I 


I 


CHESTER   A.   SHEPPARD 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  77 

speaker,  but  his  oratory  is  not  of  the  flowery  type.  He  possesses  a  keen,  analytical 
mind,  the  ability  to  state  his  thoughts  clearly  and  the  force  of  his  logic  is  convincing. 
While  most  of  his  work  has  been  along  the  line  of  organizing  corporations  and  acting 
as  their  counsel,  he  excels  as  a  trial  lawyer.  He  is  a  hard,  conscientious  worker  and 
a  man  who  never  gives  up  a  cause  for  a  client  until  it  is  won  or  has  been  absolutely 
and  finally  lost,  practicing  his  profession  not  for  the  money  he  may  make  but  for 
the  aid  he  is  able  to  give  his  clients.  Notwithstanding  reverses,  which  have  come 
to  him  mostly  through  business  associates  whom  he  trusted  too  much,  contrary  to 
his  better  judgment,  he  has  accumulated  substantial  holdings  in  lands,  stocks  and 
bonds  and  is  secretary  and  a  director  of  the  Monarch  Mills  Company.  The  iron 
constitution  which  he  gained  through  years  of  strenuous  labor  on  the  farm  and  through 
clean  living  has  been  of  inestimable  value  to  him  in  working  his  way  upward  in  his 
profession  and  he  attributes  his  present  success  in  large  measure  to  hard  work,  per- 
sistency of  purpose  and  firm  determination. 

On  the  20th  of  August,  1902,  in  Grant,  Michigan,  Mr.  Sheppard  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Ethelyn  C.  Kriger,  a  daughter  of  Andrew  C.  Kriger  and  previous  to 
her  marriage  a  teacher  of  English.  She  was  a  former  pupil  in  the  State  Normal 
School  at  Ypsilanti,  Michigan,  where  she  specialized  in  the  study  of  English  and 
composition.     To   this   union   has   been   born   a    daughter,   Margaret   Ethelyn. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Sheppard  is  a  republican  but  is  not  active  in  politics. 
Fraternally  he  is  identified  with  the  Masons,  belonging  to  Imperial  Lodge,  No.  159; 
to  Portland  Chapter,  R.  A.  M.;  to  Oregon  Commandery,  K.  T.;  to  the  Scottish  and 
York  Rite  Consistories  and  to  Al  Kader  Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  is  also 
connected  with  the  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men  and  is  popular  in  club  circles  of  the 
city  as  a  member  of  the  Portland  Golf  and  Multnomah  Amateur  Athletic  Clubs.  He 
is  also  identified  with  the  Oregon  State  Motor  Association  and  his  professional  con- 
nections are  with  the  Oregon  State  and  Multnomah  County  Bar  Associations.  His 
religious  faith  is  indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church. 
Mr.  Sheppard  is  fond  of  good  literature,  being  especially  interested  in  the  study  of 
history  and  upon  all  the  vital  questions  and  issues  of  the  day  he  keeps  well  informed. 
During  the  World  war  he  served  on  the  legal  advisory  board,  was  one  of  the  Four- 
Minute  speakers  for  Oregon  and  was  also  active  in  promoting  the  various  bond  drives, 
doing  everything  in  his  power  to  aid  the  government  in  its  time  of  need.  A  con- 
suming desire  to  succeed  in  life,  coupled  with  a  dogged  determination  to  carry  out 
every  worthy  task  undertaken  without  regard  to  hard  work  or  the  sacrifice  of  pleasure, 
have  won  for  Mr.  Sheppard  a  place  among  the  foremost  lawyers  of  the  northwest. 
He  is  characterized  by  one  who  knows  him  well  as  follows:  "The  term  'sober  as  a 
judge'  exactly  describes  his  manner,  which  conceals  a  warm,  sympathetic  nature  and 
a  keen  sense  of  humor,  which  are  discovered  only  by  recipients  of  his  kindness  and 
his  intimate  associates  and  friends."  He  devotes  a  few  weeks  each  year  to  hunting 
and  fishing  in  the  mountains  and  is  also  fond  of  golf,  and  is  thus  leading  a  well 
balanced  life  conducive  to  vigorous  mental  and  physical  development.  Starting  out 
upon  his  career  with  no  capital  except  the  determination  to  succeed,  he  has  attained 
success  and  stands  today  as  a  splendid  example  of  that  peculiarly  American  product 
— a   self-made  man. 


JESSE  O.   HALES. 


A  prominent  and  progressive  farmer  of  Umatilla  county  is  Jesse  0.  Hales,  resid- 
ing on  section  36,  township  4,  north,  range  33.  He  was  born  in  Henry  county,  Iowa. 
December  2.  186S,  a  son  of  Americus  B.  and  Susie  (Stubbs)  Hales,  both  natives  of  the 
same  county,  in  which  county  also  their  marriage  was  celebrated.  For  some  time 
Americus  Hales  and  his  wife  farmed  in  Iowa,  but  in  1S75  sold  their  land  and  came  to 
Oregon,  locating  one  mile  east  and  north  of  the  present  home.  In  addition  to  taking 
a  homestead  Americus  B.  Hales  preempted  a  timber  claim  and  soon  brought  his  land 
into  a  highly  cultivated  state.  Later  he  added  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres.  Here 
Mr.  and  Jlrs.  Hales  resided  the  remainder  of  their  lives,  well  known  and  respected 
citizens  of  the  community.  The  father  died  in  1S90,  at  the  age  of  forty-seven  years, 
and  the  mother  passed  away  but  four  years  ago,  at  the  age  of  sixty-seven.  Throughout 
his  life  Americus  Hales  was  a  stanch  supporter  of  the  republican  party  and  both  he 
and   his   wife   were  consistent   members  of   the   Methodist  Episcopal   church.     In   1S61, 


78  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

upon  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war,  Americas  B.  Hales  enlisted  in  Company  K,  Fourth 
Iowa  Cavalry,  with  which  he  served  four  years,  lacking  about  seven  days.  He  was  with 
Sherman  on  his  march  to  the  sea  and  he  participated  in  many  of  the  important  battles 
of  the  war. 

Jesse  O.  Hales  spent  his  boyhood  on  the  old  home  farm  and  received  his  education 
in  the  public  schools  of  the  community.  He  followed  in  the  footsteps  of  his  father, 
taking  up  farming,  and  is  now  one  of  the  most  successful  and  progressive  members 
of  his  profession  in  Umatilla  couhty.  The  farm  is  up-to-date  in  every  respect  and  the 
farm  house  and  outbuildings  have  the  most  modern  equipment.  In  addition  to  his 
agricultural  interests  Mr.  Hales  is  president  of  the  Inland  Mercantile  Company  at 
Adams  and  in  financial  circles  he  is  prominent  as  a  stockholder  in  the  American  Na- 
tional Bank. 

In  1892  Mr.  Hales  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Grace  Morrison,  a  daughter  of 
John  and  Grace  (Reed)  Morrison,  and  a  native  of  New  Zealand.  Her  mother  was  born 
near  Glasgow,  Scotland,  and  her  father  in  that  city.  Their  marriage  was  celebrated 
there  and  they  later  removed  to  New  Zealand,  where  they  engaged  in  dairying  until 
1876,  when  they  came  to  the  United  States,  settling  near  Adams,  and  here  Mr.  Morri- 
son took  up  a  homestead  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres.  He  improved  this  land 
and  resided  there  until  his  death  in  1902,  at  the  age  of  seventy-five  years.  Mrs.  Mor- 
rison passed  away  in  1898.  They  were  representative  citizens  of  their  community 
and  in  politics  Mr.  Morrison  always  gave  his  allegiance  to  the  republican  party.  Both 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Morrison  were  consistent  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  active 
in  the  interests  of  that  organization.  To  the  union  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hales  two  chil- 
dren have  been  born:  Hilda,  now  Mrs.  J.  E.  McCormack;  and  John,  who  is  engaged  in 
farming. 

Since  age  conferred  upon  Mr.  Hales  the  right  of  franchise  he  has  been  a  stanch 
supporter  of  the  republican  party  and  the  principles  for  which  it  stands.  Fraternally 
he  is  affiliated  with  the  Masons  and  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order 
of  Odd  Fellows.  He  is  active  in  various  affairs  for  the  development  and  improvement 
of  the  community  in  which  he  resides  and  his  reward  for  a  life  of  diligence  and  indus- 
try is  more  than  a  substantial  amount  of 


LOUIS   BLUMAUER. 


Louis  Blumauer  passed  away  on  the  4th  of  May,  1906,  and  thus  the  city  lost  one 
who  had  taken  an  active  part  in  shaping  its  history  during  the  formative  period  and 
who  for  a  half  century  was  closely  connected  with  its  interests  and  welfare.  Port- 
land numbered  him  among  her  native  sons,  his  birth  having  here  occurred  on  the  1st 
of  February,  1856,  and  thus  for  fifty  years  his  memory  constituted  a  connecting  link 
between  the  primitive  past  with  its  hardships  and  privations  and  the  progressive 
present  with  its  advantages  and  opportunities.  He  was  a  son  of  Simon  Blumauer,  who 
had  early  located   in  Portland. 

The  schools  of  the  then  little  town  afforded  him  his  educational  privileges  and 
in  time  he  was  graduated  from  a  grammar  school  conducted  by  the  late  Bishop  Morris. 
He  then  went  east  for  further  study  and  in  1876  completed  a  course  in  the  New  York 
College  of  Pharmacy.  Following  his  return  to  Portland  he  acquainted  himself  with 
the  practical  end  of  the  retail  drug  trade  in  the  store  of  Charles  Woodward  and  when 
he  felt  that  his  knowledge  and  experience  justified  such  a  step  he  engaged  in  business 
on  his  own  account,  opening  a  retail  drug  store  on  First  street,  between  Morrison  and 
Yamhill,  in  1877.  There  he  successfully  conducted  his  interests  for  several  years  and 
in  1SS4  organized  the  Blumauer-Frank  Wholesale  Drug  Company,  in  association  with 
Emil  Frank.  Louis  Blumauer  was  known  as  one  of  the  most  practical  and  thorough- 
going business  men  in  the  northwest.  All  of  his  commercial  transactions  were  char- 
acterized by  a  high  sense  of  business  integrity  and  enterprise  and  at  all  times  he  held 
to  the  most  advanced  commercial  standards.  He  developed  a  trade  of  large  propor- 
tions as  a  wholesale  drug  dealer,  his  ramifying  trade  connections  covering  a  wide 
territory.  He  continued  until  the  time  of  his  death  as  president  of  the  Blumauer-Frank 
Drug  Company,  the  business  becoming  one  of  the  extensive  and  profitable  mercantile 
enterprises  of  the  city. 

Mr.  Blumauer  was  united  in  marriage  to  Dr.  Frances  Murray,  who  survives  him, 
his  death  having  occurred  on  the  5th  of  May,  1906.     In  his  passing  Portland  lost  one  of 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  79 

tier  most  highly  respected  and  valued  residents.  He  was  a  public-spirited  man  who 
took  great  interest  in  everything  that  pertained  to  the  benefit  and  welfare  of  the  city 
and  of  the  state.  He  was  extremely  charitable  and  during  the  hard  times  provided 
for  many  families  who  were  in  destitute  circumstances.  He  gave  most  liberally  where 
aid  was  needed  but  also  most  unostentatiously.  He  cared  nothing  for  notoriety  con- 
cerning his  good  deeds  and  many  of  his  kind  acts  were  never  known  save  to  himself 
and  the  recipient.  Mr.  Blumauer  was  a  man  of  very  scholarly  attainments.  Under  the 
direction  of  Rev.  Dr.  Rosenburg  he  studied  Greek,  Latin,  Hebrew  and  German  and  he 
was  acquainted  with  the  best  literature  of  all  the  ages.  His  liberal  scholarship  made 
him  the  prized  friend  and  companion  of  many  of  Portland's  most  learned  men,  while 
at  the  same  time  his  business  qualifications  continued  him  in  a  position  of  leader- 
ship in  mercantile  circles. 


HON.   GEORGE   CLAYTON  BROWNELL. 

Among  the  most  alert  and  astute  practitioners  at  the  bar  of  Oregon,  and  one  of 
the  most  distinguished  lawyers  of  that  state,  is  Hon.  George  Clayton  Brownell,  ex- 
president  of  the  Oregon  senate.  He  was  born  at  Willsboro,  New  York,  in  1854,  the  son 
of  Ambrose  and  Annie  (Smith)  Brownell.  The  family  was  of  French  and  English  de- 
scent and  the  American  branch  was  established  in  New  England  in  the  earliest  history 
of  America.  Ambrose  Brownell  was  a  native  of  New  York  and  a  famous  soldier  in  the 
Civil  war. 

George  Clayton  Brownell  was  educated  in  the  schools  and  academies  of  his  native 
state  and  studied  law  in  the  office  of  the  Hon.  Charles  Beale,  who  was  a  member  of 
Congress  for  that  district.  In  1882  he  was  admitted  to  practice  and  removed  to  Frank- 
fort, Kansas,  where  he  soon  established  a  reputation  at  the  bar  and  a  place  in  local 
politics,  which  assured  his  election  as  mayor  of  the  city  in  1SS4.  At  the  end  of  his 
term,  in  1886,  he  removed  to  Ness  City,  Kansas,  and  settled  there.  Here  he  built  up  a 
large  practice  and  served  as  county  attorney  and  as  attorney  for  the  Denver.  Memphis 
and  Atlantic  Railway.  Still  impelled  by  the  urge  of  the  west  he  came  to  Oregon  in  1891 
and  in  the  thirty  years  of  his  residence  has  not  only  become  a  noted  lawyer  but  a 
factor  to  be  reckoned  with  in  the  law-making  body  of  the  state.  In  1894  he  was  elected 
state  senator  over  his  opponent,  W.  H.  Starkweather,  who  was  an  old-time  resident  and 
a  member  of  the  First  Constitutional  Convention.  He  was  re-elected  in  1898,  defeating 
W.  S.  Urran,  and  again  in  1902,  having  been  nominated  by  acclamation  in  every  one  of 
the  eighty-six  precincts  of  the  county.  In  the  session  of  1898  he  was  chosen  by  the  re- 
publican caucus  to  present  the  name  of  Hon.  Joseph  Simon  as  United  States  senator. 
Mr.  Brownell  was  made  president  of  the  senate  in  1903.  and  was  largely  instrumental 
in  the  election  of  C.  W.  Fulton  to  the  senate  of  the  United  States. 

Mr.  Brownell's  record  of  service  to  the  state  of  Oregon  is  one  of  honor.  He  was 
the  introducer  and  had  charge  in  the  senate  of  the  initiative  and  referendum  measure 
which  has  changed  the  entire  system  of  elections  and  caused  the  discard  of  the  old 
convention  method.  He  has  always  been  both  progressive  and  aggressive.  He  believes 
in  the  election  of  United  States  senators  directly  by  the  people.  A  strong  advocate  of 
woman's  suffrage,  as  president  of  the  senate  he  signed  the  amendment  to  the  constitu- 
tion of  Oregon.  He  was  the  author  of  a  law  granting  the  laboring  man  who  is  the  head 
of  a  family,  thirty  days'  pay  tree  from  attachment  and  execution  for  debt.  Through 
the  instrumentality  of  Mr.  Brownell  many  other  progressive  and  valuable  laws  were 
introduced  and  passed  in  Oregon.  He  had  charge  of  the  Clackamas  County  Prohibition 
Committee,  although  a  republican,  when  the  issue  carried  the  county  by  thirteen  hundred 
majority,  and  in  1910  was  elected  mayor  of  Oregon  City.  In  1917  he  was  elected  to 
the  House  of  Representatives. 

Mr.  Brownell  was  married  at  Rockland,  Massachusetts,  to  Miss  Alma  C.  Lane  of 
that  state.  They  have  two  sons:  Howard,  who  is  practicing  law  at  Eugene,  Oregon; 
and  Ambrose,  who  is  a  farmer.  The  latter  joined  the  colors  immediately  upon  his 
graduation  from  Reed  College  in  1917  and  was  sent  to  France  where  he  distinguished 
himself  in  what  was  known  as  the  flash  and  sound  department  and  returned  home  with 
a  lieutenant's  commission.  His  handsome  residence  and  estate  at  Concord,  Clackamas 
county,  has  the  largest  holly  orchard  in  the  west. 

Mr.  Brownell  is  especially  proficient  as  a  trial  lawyer,  being  a  brilliant  and  con- 
vincing orator.     In  the  extra  session  of  the  state  legislature  he  introduced  a  resolution 


80  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

demanding  the  nomination  of  Theodore  Roosevelt  for  president  of  the  United  States, 
which  was  carried  by  a  large  majority.  His  address  of  welcome  to  President  Roosevelt 
on  behalf  of  the  Senate  and  the  House  of  the  state  of  Oregon  is  regarded  as  a  master- 
piece. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Brownell  is  connected  with  the  Maccabees,  the  Woodmen  of  the 
World,  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen,  and  the  Red  Men.  As  an  attorney,  a  law- 
maker and  a  citizen  of  sterling  character,  no  man  stands  higher  than  George  C.  Brownell. 


ALFRED  L.  RICHARDSON,  M.  D. 

For  over  thirty  years  Dr.  Alfred  L.  Richardson  has  been  prominent  in  the  medical 
circles  of  Union  county.  In  1891  he  began  practice  at  La  Grande  and  there  has  re- 
mained, having  built  up  an  extensive  and  lucrative  practice.  Dr.  Alfred  L.  Richard- 
son was  born  in  Higginsport,  Brown  county,  Ohio,  February  10,  1870,  a  son  of  Joseph 
T.  and  Margaret  Jane  (Bolander)  Richardson,  both  natives  of  Brown  county,  Ohio. 
There  the  father,  who  was  also  a  prominent  physician,  received  his  early  education, 
later  going  to  Cincinnati  to  obtain  his  medical  education.  Dr.  Joseph  T.  Richardson 
practiced  at  Higginsport  and  at  other  places  throughout  Brown  county,  his  calls  being 
made  on  horseback  or  in  a  sulky.  He  was  a  prominent  and  active  citizen  of  his  com- 
munity and  represented  Brown  county  in  the  state  legislature  at  Columbus  for  a 
number  of  terms.  Dr.  Joseph  Richardson  in  later  life  removed  to  Cumberland  county, 
Illinois,  where  in  addition  to  his  practice  he  engaged  in  farming,  having  purchased 
some  raw  land  which  he  cultivated  by  the  aid  of  ox-teams.  The  death  of  Dr.  Richard- 
son occurred  at  the  age  of  forty-two  years,  as  the  result  of  typhoid  fever  which  had 
been  easily  contracted  in  his  overworked  condition.  Throughout  his  life  Dr.  Richard- 
son was  a  stanch  supporter  of  the  democratic  party  and  as  a  member  of  the  Masonic 
fraternity  he  had  had  conferred  upon  him  the  honorary  thirty-third  degree.  Both  he 
and  his  wife  were  consistent  members  of  the  Christian  church.  Mrs.  Richardson  sur- 
vived her  husband  for  a  number  of  years.  Her  death  occurred  at  the  home  of  her 
daughter,  Mrs.  Ellen  R.  Mason  of  La  Grande,  on  November  5,  1917,  at  the  advanced 
age  of  eighty-seven  years.  She  was  well  known  in  La  Grande  as  an  active  member 
of  the  Christian  church,  in  which  denomination  she  had  taken  a  prominent  part  for 
seventy-five  years. 

At  the  age  of  two  and  one-half  years  Alfred  L.  Richardson  left  his  native  state, 
removing  to  Illinois  with  his  parents  and  located  in  Neoga.  There  he  received  his 
early  education  and  graduated  from  the  high  school.  Determining  upon  a  medical 
career,  he  entered  the  American  Medical  College  at  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  in  1SS7,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  in  1890.  He  then  took  postgraduate  work  in  St.  Louis  until 
the  latter  part  of  that  year.  Deciding  upon  the  west  as  a  likely  location  in  which 
to  practice,  he  left  for  Oregon,  and  on  the  23d  of  April,  1S91,  arrived  in  La  Grande. 
The  town  then  had  a  population  of  about  twelve  hundred  people  and  he  established 
offices  on  the  site  where  the  Huntington  block  now  stands.  It  was  not  long  before  Dr. 
Richardson  became  known  as  a  physician  of  ability  and  his  practice  became  an  ex- 
tensive and  lucrative  one.  For  thirty  years  he  has  made  La  Grande  his  home  and  in 
this  time  he  has  made  many  friends,  who  appreciate  his  true  personal  worth  and  his 
many  sterling  characteristics.  His  practice  has  so  grown  that  he  erected  a  fine  office 
building,  supervising  the  work  himself.  There  all  the  up-to-date  equipment  necessary 
for  his  profession  may  be  found.  Dr.  Richardson  has  never  given  up  the  study  of  his 
profession  but  applies  himself  diligently  in  order  to  keep  up  with  the  rapid  strides 
being  made  in  its  advancement.  In  1900  he  attended  the  Bennett  Medical  College  at 
Chicago,  completing  his  course  there  in  1901.  and  since  then  he  has  done  postgraduate 
work  in  Chicago,  New  York,  Boston  and  with  the  Mayo  Brothers  at  Rochester.  Minne- 
sota. Dr.  Richardson  was  the  pioneer  promoter  of  the  present  Grand  Ronde  Hospital, 
is  one  of  the  large  stockholders  and  is  the  secretary-treasurer  and  manager  of  this 
very  efficient  institution.  In  addition  to  his  professional  interests  Dr.  Richardson 
takes  an  active  interest  in  agriculture  and  he  owns  a  two  hundred  and  forty  acre 
dairy,  alfalfa  and  hay  ranch,  located  near  Baker  city.  The  popularity  of  Dr.  Richard- 
son has  been  manifest  in  his  election  to  the  office  of  mayor  on  two  different  occasions 
and  he  was  a  prominent  member  of  the  city  council  for  three  years. 

In   189S  occurred   the   marriage   of  Dr.  Richardson   and   Miss  Lilian   May   Bates,   a 


DR.   ALFRED   L.   RICHARDSON 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  83 

daughter  of  James  Adison  and  Mary  A.  (Leach)  Bates,  and  a  native  of  Cuba,  Missouri. 
Mrs.  Richardson  came  west  at  the  age  of  fourteen  years.  She  is  the  possessor  of  a 
beautiful  soprano  voice,  having  been  a  student  under  Oscar  Sanger  of  New  York,  Mrs. 
Rose  Coursen  Reed  of  Portland,  Oregon,  and  Arthur  Alexander  of  Paris,  France.  She 
is  well  known  musically  as  a  soloist  throughout  the  northwest. 

The  political  allegiance  of  Dr.  Richardson  has  always  been  given  to  the  democratic 
party,  in  the  activities  of  which  he  has  ever  taken  an  active  interest.  Fraternally 
he  is  identified  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and 
the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  Dr.  Richardson  is  appreciative  of  the  social 
amenities  of  life  and  to  this  end  is  a  member  of  the  La  Grande  Country  Club,  of  which 
he  is  a  director.  He  is  accorded  high  professional  recognition  by  the  other  members 
of  his  profession  throughout  the  county  and  state  and  is  acknowledged  to  be  a  repre- 
sentative citizen  of  La  Grande,  Union  county. 


JOHN  GEORGE  HEIMRICH. 


John  George  Heimrich  is  one  of  the  valued  residents  of  The  Dalles.  Through  the 
long  years  of  his  connection  with  the  northwest  he  has  been  identified  with  the  develop- 
ment of  mining  interests,  with  the  building  of  railroads  and  with  the  conduct  of  com- 
mercial and  financial  interests  to  an  extent  that  places  him  in  the  front  rank  of  the 
foremost  citizens  of  the  state.  He  was  born  at  Hooper,  Nebraska,  in  1875,  his  parents 
being  John  and  Elizabeth  (Knoell)  Heimrich.  The  father  was  a  native  of  Ohio  and 
served  his  country  as  a  soldier  of  the  Union  army  in  the  Civil  war.  After  hostilities 
had  ceased  he  removed  to  Nebraska  in  1865  and  established  the  first  successful  brick 
manufacturing  plant  in  that  state.  It  had  been  said  that  the  clay  of  Nebraska  could 
not  be  utilized  in  making  brick,  but  Mr.  Heimrich  demonstrated  that  he  knew  the 
business  thoroughly  and  for  nineteen  years  continued  to  operate  successfully  along 
the  line  of  brick  manufacturing.  He  also  established  the  first  bank  at  Hooper,  Ne- 
braska, and  became  its  president,  while  at  the  same  time  he  occupied  the  presi- 
dency of  two  other  banks  in  that  state.  From  1884  until  1888  he  represented  his 
county  in  the  legislature  of  Nebraska  and  left  the  impress  of  his  individuality  and 
ability  upon  the  laws  which  were  enacted  during  his  connection  with  the  general  assem- 
bly. In  1888  he  became  interested  in  gold  mining  at  Mercur,  Utah,  and  was  there  for- 
tunate enough  to  locate  the  mother  lode  of  that  district. 

John  George  Heimrich  was  educated  in  the  graded  and  high  schools  of  Hooper, 
Nebraska,  also  in  the  University  of  Nebraska  and  in  the  Omaha  Business  College.  He 
started  upon  his  business  career  as  a  clerk  in  the  Bank  of  Hooper  and  while  there  he 
learned  of  the  McArthur-Forest  cyanide  process  for  extracting  gold.  His  father's  venture 
in  the  mining  game  was  not  proving  profitable,  so  that  the  young  man  took  up  the 
new  process  with  his  father,  with  the  result  that  he  journeyed  to  Utah  to  test  the  value 
of  cyanide  extraction.  After  many  vicissitudes  in  the  business  success  was  reached 
and  in  three  years  the  Mercur  Gold  Mining  &  Milling  Company  paid  in  dividends  three 
and  a  quarter  million  dollars.  The  mine  was  located  sixteen  miles  from  the  town  of 
Fairfield,  on  the  Oregon  Short  Line,  and  the  ores  had  to  be  transported  by  teams  at 
great  expense.  John  G.  Heimrich  was  one  of  the  important  factors  in  the  building  of  a 
railroad  and  finally  the  plans  resulted  in  the  construction  of  the  Salt  Lake  &  Mercur 
Railroad,  with  a  length  of  twenty-nine  miles,  graded  around  hilltops  to  such  an  extent 
that  at  one  point  there  were  fourteen  tracks  one  above  the  other.  The  Mercur  mine 
interests  were  at  length  sold  to  and  controlled  by  Captain  De  La  Mar  of  New  York. 
Mercur,  due  to  the  efforts  of  the  Heimrichs,  was  developed  from  a  town  of  practically 
nothing  to  a  city  of  more  than  seven  thousand  population. 

In  1896  John  Heimrich,  father  of  John  George  Heimrich,  went  to  Seattle,  Wash- 
ington, with  the  intention  of  investigating  conditions  in  the  Klondike.  He  decided  to 
engage  in  business  in  connection  with  Klondike  interests  and  organized  the  Northwest 
Commercial  Company  for  the  purpose  of  furnishing  supplies  to  Alaskans.  John  G. 
Heimrich  remained  in  charge  of  the  Utah  property  until  it  was  transferred  to  Captain 
De  La  Mar  in  1899,  when  he  followed  his  father  to  the  Puget  Sound  city.  There  he 
became  secretary  of  the  Washington  Trust  Company  and  a  member  of  the  executive 
committee  of  the  Washington  Trust  Bank.  He  remained  in  Seattle  until  1904,  when 
he  went  to  The  Dalles  to  look  after  the  interests  of  the  bank  in  connection  with  a  pro- 
posed railroad  which  at  that  time  was  but  a  survey  and  right  of  way  from  The  Dalles 


84  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

to  Friend,  a  distance  of  forty-three  miles.  Mr.  Heimrich  proceeded  to  build  the  road 
and  having  settled  the  claims  against  the  promoter,  opened  the  road  for  the  transporta- 
tion of  the  1905  crop.  He  became  general  manager  of  the  road  and  still  holds  that 
position.  The  line  is  known  as  the  Great  Southern  Railway  and  has  proven  a  blessing 
to  Wasco  county,  serving  as  it  does  the  ranchers  from  The  Dalles  to  Friend  and  con- 
necting with  the  Oregon  Railroad  &  Navigation  Company  at  The  Dalles.  Mr.  Heimrich 
is  also  president  of  the  Manchester  Box  &  Lumber  Company,  large  manufacturers  of 
boxes  and  crates  and  also  conducting  an  extensive  business  as  lumber  dealers.  He 
established  at  Friend  the  Wasco  Pine  Box  &  Lumber  Company,  of  which  he  is  presi- 
dent and  manager,  and  in  this  connection  operates  a  large  sawmill.  His  business  inter- 
ests are  indeed  extensive  and  important.  His  father  passed  away  in  1913,  leaving  a 
very  large  estate  in  a  twenty-five  year  trust,  of  which  John  G.  Heimrich  is  the  trustee. 
The  estate  among  its  other  assets  has  valuable  business  property  in  several  sections, 
notably  Seattle,  where  the  holdings  include  the  Maritime  building  occupying  an  entire 
block  on  Western  avenue,  the  wholesale  center  of  the  city,  also  the  Produce  building, 
occupying  the  entire  block  opposite.  This  one  piece  of  realty  alone  is  worth  more  than 
a  million  dollars.  From  early  manhood  John  G.  Heimrich  was  associated  with  his 
father  in  business,  the  efforts  of  the  one  ably  rounding  out  and  supplementing  the 
labors  of  the  other.  He  is  a  man  of  most  progressive  spirit  and  notably  keen  business 
insight.  Whatever  he  undertakes  he  carries  forward  to  successful  completion.  His 
path  has  never  been  strewn  with  the  wreck  of  other  men's  failures,  for  he  has  followed 
constructive  methods  and  has  been  the  builder  and  promoter  of  many  important  projects 
which  have  led  to  the  prosperity  and  greatness  of  the  state. 


GEORGE  WASHINGTON  WEIDLER. 

The  beautiful  city  of  Portland  with  its  ramifying  industrial  and  commercial  inter- 
ests is  not  the  outgrowth  of  the  efforts  of  a  single  individual  but  of  the  combined 
labors  of  various  progressive  and  representative  business  men,  who  at  an  early  day 
became  identified  with  the  northwest  and  saw  the  possibilities  for  the  development  of 
a  city  of  importance  on  the  Willamette.  Among  this  number  was  George  Washington 
Weidler  and  as  the  years  passed  he  became  an  active  factor  in  railroad  building,  in 
manufacturing  and  in  the  development  of  various  public  utilities,  his  life  work  thus 
becoming  one  of  signal  usefulness  to  the  community.  He  was  the  fourth  child  and 
third  son  of  Dr.  Isaac  Carpenter  and  Catherine  (Gealbaugh)  Weidler  and  was  born  at 
Mechanicsburg,  Upper  Leacock  township,  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania,  October 
22,  1837.  His  father,  a  son  of  Jacob  and  Elizabeth  Weidler,  was  born  October  3,  1S03, 
and  passed  away  on  the  31st  of  January,  1885.  He  practiced  medicine  in  Upper  Leacock 
township  for  fifty-five  years  and  his  grave  was  then  made  in  Heller's  churchyard  on 
the  New  Holland  turnpike,  where  four  generations  of  the  family  are  buried.  His  wife, 
Catherine  (Gealbaugh)  Weidler,  was  a  daughter  of  Anna  and  Frederick  Gealbaugh  and 
was  born  March  7,  1807,  while  her  death  occurred  May  15,  1848.  Her  mother  was  born 
in  1779  and  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Carpenter,  while  the  family  name  was  originally 
Zimmerman.  The  death  of  Mrs.  Anna  Gealbaugh  occurred  in  1865,  she  having  survived 
her  daughter  Catherine  for  a  number  of  years. 

In  the  acquirement  of  his  education  George  W.  Weidler  attended  the  schools  of 
Mount  Joy  and  of  Strasburg.  Pennsylvania,  but  when  still  quite  young  made  his  way 
to  St.  Louis  where  he  engaged  in  clerking  in  a  hardware  store,  which  afterward  became 
the  Richards  Hardware,  the  largest  enterprise  of  the  kind  in  the  city.  Subsequently 
he  occupied  a  position  as  freight  clerk  on  a  steamboat  running  from  St.  Louis  to  New 
Orleans  and  in  1S55  was  given  charge  of  a  train  of  mule  teams  going  to  Salt  Lake  with 
merchandise  for  the  firm  of  Livingston,  Bell  &  Company,  in  whose  store  he  afterward 
acted  as  a  clerk  for  about  three  years.  Later  Mr.  Weidler  became  a  sutler  at  Fort 
Bridger  and  subsequently  was  made  agent  for  the  Overland  Stage  Company.  Following 
the  establishment  of  the  pony  express  he  was  appointed  agent  thereof  and  general 
manager  under  Ben  HoUiday  and  he  acted  as  stage  agent  for  the  line  extending  to 
Virginia  City  during  the  days  of  gold  mining  there.  When  Mr.  Holliday  disposed  of 
his  stage  line  in  1864  Mr.  Weidler  was  made  purser  on  steamers  running  from  San 
Francisco  to  Mayland,  lower  California,  thus  serving  during  the  time  of  the  Mexican 
revolution,  which  ended  in  the  execution  of  the  emperor,  Maximilian. 

Mr.  Weidler  first  came  to  Portland.  Oregon,  in  1S66  as  purser  on  the  Sierra  Nevada 


I 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  85 

from  San  Francisco,  occupying  that  position  for  two  years,  when  in  1S68  he  was  ap- 
pointed general  agent  for  all  the  steamers  owned  by  Ben  Holliday  that  plied  between 
Victoria  and  San  Francisco  and  later  made  trips  to  Sitka,  Alaska.  Mr.  Weidler  con- 
tinued to  act  as  agent  until  the  Holliday  interests  were  taken  over  by  Henry  Villard 
for  the  German  stockholders.  Mr.  Weidler  then  turned  his  attention  to  finishing  the 
building  of  the  railroad  line  between  Salem  and  Portland  in  1S69  and  thereby  saved  to 
Mr.  Holliday  his  land  grant.  When  the  line  was  completed  he  organized  the  Willamette 
Steam  Mills  Lumbering  &  Manufacturing  Company,  continuing  the  mills  that  had  been 
used  in  building  the  railroad,  the  plant  having  at  that  time  the  largest  capacity  for 
sawing  lumber  in  Oregon  and  was  later  increased.  This,  however,  constituted  but  one 
phase  of  Mr.  Weidler's  activities,  for  his  cooperation  was  continuously  sought  in  other 
fields  and  he  became  an  important  factor  in  establishing  the  first  street  car  service  in 
Portland,  in  establishing  the  electric  light  plant  of  the  city  and  also  in  organizing  the 
first  telephone  company.  He  differentiated  readily  between  the  essential  and  the  non- 
essential in  business  affairs  and  possessed  marked  ability  in  coordinating  seemingly 
diverse  elements  into  a  unified  and  harmonious  whole. 

On  the  1st  of  October,  1S79.  Mr.  Weidler  was  married  to  Miss  Hattie  Louise  Bacon, 
a  daughter  of  C.  P.  Bacon,  a  prominent  stockman  of  Oregon.  The  ancestral  line  of  the 
family  is  traced  back  to  1650.  Nathaniel  Bacon  was  the  eldest  son  of  William  Bacon 
who  was  born  in  Stretton,  Rutland  county,  England,  and  emigrated  to  the  new  world 
in  1649,  settling  at  Hartford,  Connecticut,  where  he  resided  with  his  uncle,  Andrew 
Bacon.  In  the  fall  of  1650  he  joined  a  company  organized  for  the  planting  of  Mattaseck, 
now  Middletown,  and  afterward  became  a  leading  and  influential  citizen  of  that  place 
and  a  large  landholder  there.  Upon  the  death  of  his  uncle  he  received  by  the  terms  of 
his  will  handsome  legacies.  The  Bacon  family  was  represented  in  the  Revolutionary 
war.  The  line  of  descent  comes  down  from  Nathaniel  through  Henry,  Charles  C,  William 
and  Seth  Bacon.  Mrs.  Weidler's  mother  came  around  Cape  Horn  to  the  Pacific  coast 
and  carried  with  her  letters  for  Captain  Couch  and  Captain  Flanders  from  their 
families.  She  also  made  three  trips  to  the  Sandwich,  now  the  Hawaiian,  islands.  The 
Bacon  family  has  always  been  characterized  by  patriotic  loyalty  to  the  country  and  was 
not  only  represented  in  the  Revolutionary  war  but  also  in  the  War  of  IS  12  and  in  the 
Mexican  war.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Weidler  were  born  seven  children:  Mabel,  Hazel, 
Gladys,  Harold,  Leslie,  Clara  and  Doris,  but  the  son  Harold  died  in  infancy  and  Doris 
in  early  childhood.  Gladys  became  the  wife  of  E.  A.  de  Schweinitz  on  the  26th  of 
July,  1911,  and  on  the  14th  of  February,  1912,  Leslie  married  Stanley  Gnion  Jewett,  while 
on  the  25th  of  June,  1914,  Clara  became  the  wife  of  Andrew  Dickinson  Norris. 

The  family  circle  was  broken  by  the  hand  of  death  when,  on  the  19th  of  September, 
1908,  Mr.  Weidler  passed  away.  He  had  suffered  a  paralytic  stroke  in  August,  1905, 
and  was  never  again  in  robust  health.  He  was  a  republican  in  his  political  views  and 
in  religious  faith  an  Episcopalian.  His  life  was  one  of  intense  and  well  directed  activ- 
ity and  each  year's  labors  constituted  a  valuable  contribution  to  the  progress  and 
business  development  of  the  section  in  which  he  located.  He-  watched  with  interest  the 
growth  of  Portland  and  through  his  business  activities  met  the  needs  of  the  rapidly 
developing  city  by  supplying  public  utilities  and  otherwise  recognizing  the  demands  of 
public  life.  He  belonged  to  the  Arlington  Club  and  was  a  member  of  the  Commercial 
Club,  assisting  heartily  in  the  work  of  the  latter  organization  for  the  city's  substantial 
improvement.  He  lived  to  see  marvelous  changes  as  the  development  of  the  west  pro- 
gressed. He  came  into  the  great  western  country  when  it  was  a  wild  and  largely  un- 
settled region  and  he  lived  to  see  his  adopted  state  take  rank  with  the  most  progressive 
states  of  the  older  east,  and  the  part  which  he  played  in  bringing  about  this  result  was 
a  most  important  one. 


DAVID  HORNE. 


For  many  years  David  Home,  now  living  retired  in  Pendleton,  has  been  prominent 
in  the  agricultural  circles  of  Umatilla  county.  He  is  one  of  the  early  pioneers  of 
the  west  and  of  Oregon,  being  one  of  this  state's  successful  adopted  sons.  His  birth 
occurred  on  Prince  Edward  Island,  Nova  Scotia,  December  8,  1S39,  a  son  of  Henry  and 
Mary  (Enman)  Home,  the  former  a  native  of  England  and  the  latter  of  New  York 
state.  When  a  young  man  Henry  Home  came  to  America  and  settled  on  Prince  Edward 
Island.     There   he  followed   farming  until   1848,   when   he   removed   to  Janesville,   Wis- 


86  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

consin,  where  he  engaged  as  a  ship  carpenter,  having  learned  that  trade  while  in  Eng- 
land. In  1849  he  crossed  the  plains,  locating  in  the  vicinity  of  Sacramento,  California, 
and  he  became  a  miner  in  Placer  county.  Later  he  resumed  his  carpentering  and  con- 
tracting at  Sacramento,  in  which  line  of  business  he  continued  until  1858  when  he  went 
to  Frazier  river,  British  Columbia.  This  was  during  the  gold  rush  and  he  was  em- 
ployed in  the  building  of  a  steamboat.  The  death  of  Henry  Home  occurred  in  Clinton, 
British  Columbia,  about  1875  or  1S76.  While  residing  on  Prince  Edward  Island  he  was 
married  to  Miss  Mary  Enman  and  her  death  occurred  in  Hudson,  Wisconsin.  Her 
father,  Thomas  Enman,  took  up  land  on  Prince  Edward  Island  at  an  early  date  and 
later  in  life  he  presented  each  of  his  sons  with  a  farm  there.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Enman 
passed  away  on  the  island. 

The  boyhood  of  David  Home  was  spent  in  Wisconsin  where  he  received  his  educa- 
tion and  resided  until  1860,  when  he  crossed  the  plains,  locating  at  Atchison,  Kansas. 
While  there  he  drove  an  outfit  to  Salt  Lake  City,  Utah,  for  wages.  Cattle  were  used 
to  draw  the  wagons  and  seventy-seven  days  were  required  to  make  the  trip.  Some 
time  later  Mr.  Home  and  several  other  men  set  out  on  foot  for  Carson  City,  Nevada, 
paying  thirty  dollars  for  the  transportation  of  their  baggage  and  food  necessary  for 
the  journey.  On  arriving  there  they  cut  shingles  but  in  the  spring  engaged  in  mining. 
In  the  fall  of  1861  Mr.  Home  set  out  for  Florence,  Idaho,  but  because  of  the  great 
snowfalls  was  forced  to  abandon  the  trip.  He  then  returned  to  Carson  City  and  there 
obtained  employment  with  A.  B.  Gardner,  hauling  wood  from  Washoe  valley  to  a  half- 
way house,  and  he  also  hauled  lumber  and  liquor  to  Reece  river,  where  Mr.  Gardner 
had  established  a  hotel.  He  worked  in  the  hotel  for  some  time  and  then  drove  an 
overland  stage  between  Dry  Creek  and  Sulphur  Springs,  in  Nevada.  In  the  spring  of 
1866  he  drove  a  stage  from  Helena,  Montana,  to  Deer  Lodge,  and  previously  he  had 
driven  on  the  Fort  Benton  road.  For  one  and  one-half  years  he  drove  for  the  Wells- 
Fargo  Company  at  Carson  City.  He  drove  on  all  of  the  main  stage  routes  and  con- 
tinued in  the  business  until  1S74  when  he  took  some  stock  from  Umatilla  to  Cayuse 
Station,  Oregon.  On  the  1st  of  April,  1877,  Mr.  Home  bought  the  Union  hotel  at  Uma- 
tilla, which  he  conducted  until  the  fall  of  1882.  He  then  moved  to  Pendleton  and  con- 
ducted the  F.  A.  Lord  house  until  the  spring  of  1894.  For  the  following  three  years 
and  nine  months  he  ran  the  Pendleton  hotel  and  in  1891,  during  the  sale  of  Indian  lands, 
he  purchased  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres.  After  retiring  from  the  hotel  business  he 
engaged  in  stock  raising,  achieving  a  substantial  amount  of  success  in  this  venture. 
He  rented  some  land  on  the  reservation  and  then  purchased  four  hundred  and  eighty 
acres  south  of  Pendleton,  which  is  now  heing  farmed  by  one  of  his  sons.  Mr.  Home 
also  owns  another  ranch,  consisting  of  seventy-three  acres.  He  has  retired  from  active 
farm  and  business  life  and  is  residing  in  his  fine  home  in  Pendleton. 

On  the  22d  of  November,  1877,  Mr.  Home  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Emma 
Mead,  a  daughter  of  Albert  Mead,  and  a  native  of  Racine,  Wisconsin.  To  their  union 
three  children  have  been  born:     Enman  R.,  Blanch,  and  David  A. 

Since  age  conferred  upon  Mr.  Home  the  right  of  franchise  he  has  been  a  stanch 
supporter  of  the  republican  party,  having  firm  belief  in  the  principles  of  that  party 
as  factors  in  good  government.  When  Mr.  Home  first  came  west  the  country  was  in 
a  wild  and  uncultivated  state  and  in  the  growing  towns  there  was  much  crime  and 
outlawry.  He  has  seen  it  grow  into  a  country  dotted  with  prosperous  and  progressive 
communities  and  he  has  been  one  of  the  prominent  factors  in  this  development.  He  is 
widely  known  throughout  the  county  and  state  and  is  readily  conceded  to  be  a  repre- 
sentative citizen. 


HERBERT  R.  FIELD. 

Herbert  R.  Field,  president  of  the  Highway  Automobile  Company,  might  well  be 
termed  a  "live  wire"  in  the  common  parlance  of  the  day,  or  in  more  dignified  language 
a  dynamic  force  in  the  business  circles  of  central  Oregon.  His  enterprising  and  pro- 
gressive methods  are  well  known  to  the  people  of  Hood  River,  where  he  has  made  his 
home  from  early  manhood.  His  parents  are  Charles  F.  and  Ella  (Eychaner)  Field, 
the  father  being  one  of  the  leading  orchardists  of  the  county,  coming  to  Oregon  from 
Illinois  and  casting  in  his  lot  among  the  pioneer  settlers  of  the  Hood  River  valley. 

Herbert  R.  Field  was  educated  in  the  graded  and  high  schools  of  Monroe  center, 
Illinois,  and  completed  a  course  in  Brown's  Business  College  at  Rockford,  that  state. 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  87 

For  two  years  following  his  graduation  he  was  employed  as  a  bookkeeper  in  the  middle 
west  and  upon  the  removal  of  his  parents  to  Oregon  he,  too,  came  to  Hood  River,  where 
his  father  purchased  an  apple  orchard,  while  the  young  man  established  a  tire  shop 
and  vulcanizing  business  in  the  city.  Under  his  competent  management  and  guidance 
the  business  grew  apace  and  after  seven  years  was  taken  over  by  a  newly  organizea 
company,  operating  under  the  name  of  the  Highway  Auto  Company,  of  which  he  is 
the  president.  The  company  in  1919  erected  at  a  cost  of  thirty  thousand  dollars  one 
of  the  finest  garages  on  the  Columbia  River  highway.  It  is  located  at  the  corner  of 
Fifth  and  Oak  streets  in  Hood  River  and  is  a  concrete  building  one  hundred  by  one 
hundred  feet  and  two  stories  in  height,  with  entrance  directly  from  the  street  to  both 
floors.  It  is  fitted  with  every  device  and  convenience  known  to  the  modern  garage  and 
is  a  marked  improvement  to  the  thoroughfare.  The  other  officers  of  the  company  are: 
C.  S.  Field,  vice  president;  H.  B.  Nesbit,  secretary;  and  J.  L.  Stewart,  manager.  The 
company  acts  as  agent  for  the  Lexington  cars,  the  Atterbury  and  Tageol  trucks  and 
tractors,  the  Goodrich,  Kelly-Springfield  and  Firestone  tires  and  carries  a  full  line  of 
accessories.  Herbert  R.  Field,  the  dominant  force  in  this  important  business  enterprise, 
is  a  progressive  young  American,  who  is  also  foremost  in  all  good  works  of  citizenship. 
During  the  World  war  he  volunteered  for  the  service  of  his  country  and  was  on  active 
duty  in  France  with  the  American  Expeditionary  Forces  for  twelve  months.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  American  Legion  and  thus  is  aiding  in  promoting  principles  of  true 
Americanship  just  as  surely  and  as  effectively  as  he  did  when  wearing  the  khaki  uni- 
form on  the  fields  of  France.  He  belongs  also  to  the  Hood  River  Commercial  Club  and 
is  thus  identified  with  every  movement  for  the  upbuilding  and  benefit  of  the  city.  He 
is  very  popular  and  is  a  young  man  of  much  business  promise. 


WILLIAM  WALTER  EVERHART. 

Among  the  prominent  men  of  Clackamas  county  is  William  Walter  Everhart,  who  is 
cashier  of  the  First  National  Bank  at  Molalla.  He  is  conceded  to  be  the  best  informed 
banker  in  the  Willamette  valley  as  to  value  of  property,  knowledge  of  liens  and  moral 
risk  as  well  as  the  standing  of  customers,  and  he  has  been  untiring  in  his  efforts  to  aid 
in  the  upbuilding  of  the  state  and  community. 

A  native  son  of  Oregon  is  Mr.  Everhart,  who  was  born  in  Clackamas  county  in 
December,  1S75,  near  where  the  town  of  Molalla  is  now  located.  His  parents  were  John 
and  Kate  (Houk)  Everhart  and  they  came  to  Oregon  in  1874  from  northern  New  York, 
where  both  families  had  long  been  residents  and  pioneers  of  that  state.  The  father, 
John  Everhart,  was  a  popular  citizen  of  New  York  state  and  held  many  offices  of  im- 
portance and  trust.  He  was  a  farmer  by  occupation  but  has  now  retired  and  is  engaged 
in  the  mercantile  business  in  Portland  and  Oregon  City,  where  he  is  well  known  and 
respected. 

William  W.  Everhart  received  the  best  elementary  education  afforded  and  worked 
on  his  father's  farm  until  he  was  twenty  years  old  when,  after  engaging  at  various 
occupations,  he  purchased  about  sixty-one  acres  of 'land  at  Molalla  and  this  land  he  still 
owns  and  operates.  In  1916  Mr.  Everhart  was  elected  county  assessor  of  Clackamas 
county  and  so  successfully  filled  the  position  that  in  1918  he  was  re-elected  to  succeed 
himself.  In  1919  he  resigned  that  ofl5ce  to  accept  the  position  of  cashier  of  the  First 
National  Bank  of  Molalla.  Previous  to  its  enlargement  and  before  it  became  a  national 
institution  this  bank  had  been  operated  as  the  State  Bank  of  Molalla.  Mr.  Everhart 
still  holds  the  position  of  cashier  and  he  has  won  for  himself  the  high  regard  of  all 
those  with  whom  he  has  been  associated.  Perhaps  no  man  in  all  his  section  of  the 
state  has  done  more  for  the  upbuilding  of  his  community  than  William  Everhart.  He 
has  devoted  himself  unselfishly  to  public  service  and  Molalla  has  had  no  more  efficient 
and  progressive  mayor  than  Mr.  Everhart,  who  was  the  first  mayor  of  that  town,  which 
office  he  filled  for  five  years.  For  two  years  he  held  the  office  of  supervisor  and  for  twelve 
years  the  office  of  school  director,  always  having  taken  an  active  interest  in  the  moral 
and  intellectual  development  of  the  community.  Besides  the  positions  of  importance 
already  named  Mr.  Everhart  served  the  county  as  assessor  for  a  period  of  three  years. 
Whatever  office  Mr.  Everhart  has  held  he  has  devoted  to  it  his  time  and  energy  and 
has  always  been  an  enthusiastic  boomer  for  his  home  town,  county,  and  state,  and  to  every 
enterprise  undertaken  to  further  their  progress  in  any  way  he  has  for  many  years 
given  cheerfully  of  his  time  and  money. 


88  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

In  the  year  1898  Mr.  Everhart  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Annie  Engle,  a 
daughter  of  Samuel  Engle,  one  of  the  pioneer  farmers  of  the  state.  He  owned  consid- 
erable land  in  the  vicinity  of  Molalla  and  the  best  portion  of  the  business  section  of 
that  town  is  located  on  the  Engle  claim,  and  the  bank  building  of  which  Mr.  Everhart 
is  the  cashier  occupies  the  corner  of  the  claim  of  Samuel  Engle. 

In  fraternal  as  well  as  in  business  circles  Mr.  Everhart  is  active,  belonging  to  the 
Odd  Fellows  and  the  Elks.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  United  Artisans  and  the  Grange, 
and  Mrs.  Everhart,  who  is  also  active  in  club  and  social  life,  is  a  member  of  the  Grange 
and  the  Artisans.  Mrs.  Everhart  has  always  been  ready  to  help  in  every  undertaking 
of  the  community  and  was  of  much  service  to  the  Red  Cross  during  the  World  war. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Everhart  have  one  daughter,  Reva,  who  is  a  student  at  the  high  school, 
and  coming  from  the  best  of  the  Oregon  pioneer  stock  she  has  all  the  characteristics 
of  her  ancestors.  The  names  of  the  Engle  and  Everhart  families  have  meant  much 
in  the  upbuilding  of  Clackamas  county  and  Molalla  is  fortunate  indeed  in  having  Mr. 
Everhart  and  his  family  as  citizens. 


CAPTAIN  WILLIAM  HENRY  POPE. 

The  waterways  of  Oregon  have  proven  an  abundant  source  of  revenue  to  many 
of  the  farsighted  men  of  the  pioneer  days,  but  little  time  being  lost  after  their  emigra- 
tion before  taking  up  the  possibilities  which  lay  before  them.  One  of  these  was  Wil- 
liam Henry  Pope,  now  deceased,  who,  however  did  not  begin  this  work  upon  his  arrival 
in  the  west,  for  he  was  then  but  eleven  years  old,  but  rather  grew  into  it  as  he 
approached  maturity  and  cast  about  for  remunerative  employment.  It  was  in  1881  that 
Captain  Pope  withdrew  from  his  commercial  interests  and  became  associated  with  the 
boating  business  on  the  Columbia  and  Willamette  rivers,  and  in  his  chosen  work  he 
attained  to  a  large  degree  of  success,  becoming  a  noticeable  figure  among  the  river  men. 
From  Oregon  City,  an  early  home,  he  removed  to  Portland  and  purchased  a  comfortable 
and  pleasant  home  at  No.  441  West  Park  street,  in  which  he  resided  until  his  demise 
on  the  9th  of  June,  1915,  being  numbered  among  the  prominent  and  influential  men 
of  this  city. 

The  Pope  family  came  originally  from  England,  the  grandparents,  Charles  and 
Mary  (Chown)  Pope,  born  respectively  December  18,  1781,  and  July  31,  1779,  being 
the  first  American  emigrants.  The  death  of  both  occurred  in  New  York,  the  former 
on  February  22,  1864,  and  the  latter  October  4,  1854.  Of  their  seven  children  six  were 
born  in  Plymouth,  England.  Maria,  born  October  13,  1805.  died  March  5,  1873.  in  New 
York;  Charles,  the  father  of  our  subject,  was  born  in  Plymouth,  August  23,  1807.  Wil- 
liam died  in  infancy.  Ann,  born  September  10,  ISll.  was  married  in  New  York  to 
George  Abernethy,  January  15,  1830,  and  her  death  occurred  in  New  York,  April  30, 
1884,  her  remains  being  interred  in  Oregon  City,  Oregon,  of  which  state  her  husband 
was  the  first  provisional  governor.  His  death  occurred  in  Portland.  They  became  the 
parents  of  two  children:  William,  born  September  16.  1831,  married  Sarah  Gray  and 
made  his  home  in  Astoria:  while  Anne,  born  April  19,  1836,  was  married  in  Oregon 
City,  June  8,  1859,  to  Colonel  H.  C.  Hodges,  U.  S.  A.,  who  then  bore  the  commission 
of  lieutenant.  They  make  their  home  in  Buffalo,  New  York.  The  fifth  child  was  Mary, 
born  March  8,  1815.  She  married  Nelson  Pitkin  of  Payson,  Illinois,  October  10,  1838, 
and  died  April  23,  1849,  in  Davenport.  Iowa.  She  was  the  mother  of  three  children, 
two  sons  having  died  in  infancy.  The  surviving  child.  Mary,  was  born  in  Payson, 
Illinois,  January  7,  1841,  and  became  the  wife  of  G.  C.  Ferris  of  Syracuse.  New  York. 
Joseph,  born  May  2,  1817.  married  Martha  Hull  of  Pike  county,  Illinois,  and  died  seventy 
miles  west  of  Fort  Laramie,  July  1.  1849,  while  crossing  the  plains.  The  youngest  of 
this  family  was  Thomas,  who  was  born  in  New  York,  July  20,  1820.  He  lived  in  Quincy, 
Illinois,  for  many  years,  when  he  came  to  Oregon  City,  spent  five  years  and  then 
returned  to  Illinois,  passing  away  in  that  state  in  1900. 

It  was  in  1818  that  the  father  brought  his  large  family  to  America,  and  here  engaged 
in  the  work  of  a  mechanic,  though  two  of  his  sons,  Thomas  and  Charles,  became 
actively  interested  in  merchandising.  In  New  York  city  Charles  Pope  married  Sarah 
E.  Archer  on  the  21st  of  November,  1S32.  She  was  a  native  of  that  state,  born  in  Novem- 
ber, 1812,  the  representative  of  a  sturdy,  long-lived  family,  and  through  the  represen- 
tation of  George  Abernethy  he  was  induced  to  bring  his  family  west  and  thus  become 
a  part  of  the  western  advancement.     The   voyage   was  made  on   the  bark   Calouma,  a 


CAPTAIN  WILLIAM   H.    POPE 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  91 

period  of  one  hundred  and  fifty-three  days  being  required  to  round  the  Horn  and  land 
them  safely  in  the  new  country  they  were  seeking.  Immediately  after  landing  and 
locating  his  family  Mr.  Pope  engaged  in  a  general  merchandise  business  in  partner- 
ship with  Joseph  Ralston  at  Oregon  City,  later  moved  to  Fort  Simec,  still  later  lived 
in  Portland,  then  again  returned  to  Oregon  City,  and  was  there  engaged  in  the  hard- 
ware business,  under  the  name  of  Pope  &  Company.  This  establishment  is  still  con- 
ducted under  that  name.  His  death  occurred  there  June  11,  1S71.  Mr.  Pope's  education 
had  been  a  thoroughly  practical  one  and  it  had  enabled  him  to  make  a  success  of  his 
business,  combined  with  the  application  which  marked  his  character.  He  became  a  very 
prominent  man  in  Oregon  City,  serving  for  one  term  as  city  treasurer,  which  office  he 
was  holding  at  the  time  of  his  death.  In  the  Methodist  church  he  found  his  religious 
home  and  aimed  in  all  conscience  to  live  up  to  the  tenets  of  his  faith.  His  wife  died 
in  September,  1893,  in  her  eighty-first  year,  and  but  one  other  of  her  father's  family, 
Amanda  Baxter  of  New  York,  was  then  living.  Of  the  family  born  to  Mr.  Pope  and  his 
wife  there  were  seven  children:  Charles  Wesley  was  born  in  New  York,  September 
27,  1833,  and  he  was  married  in  Oregon  City,  Oregon,  May  14,  1862,  to  Hattie  Pease; 
this  son  became  a  hardware  merchant  of  Oregon  City  and  so  continued  until  his  death, 
which  occurred  by  drowning  in  the  Clackamas  river,  March  28,  1877,  and  his  wife  later 
made  her  home  in  Portland.  They  were  the  parents  of  four  children,  namely:  Ada 
Piggott  and  Mary  Hemenway,  both  deceased;  Charles  Wesley  of  Oregon  City;  and 
B°rtrand,  who  died  in  Spokane,  Washington,  at  the  age  of  twenty-two  years.  Mary 
Sophia  was  the  second  child  and  was  born  January  2,  1836,  in  New  York  city,  and 
on  the  12th  of  September,  1S60,  she  married  Dr.  R.  H.  Lansdale,  now  deceased,  and  she 
pissed  away  nt  Olympia,  Washington,  in  1896,  leaving  three  children:  Minnie  Aldridge, 
of  Seattle,  Washington;  Anna  Root  of  Seattle,  Washington;  and  Charles  of  Olympia, 
Washington.  The  next  in  order  of  birth  was  William  Henry  of  this  review.  Thomas 
Albert,  born  November  IS,  1842,  was  married  June  1,  1871,  to  Laura  E.  Warner  and  they 
now  make  their  home  in  Oregon  City,  where  he  engaged  in  the  hardware  business. 
Three  children  have  been  born  to  them:  George,  deceased;  Etta  the  wife  of  Franklin 
T.  GrifflMi  '-f  Portland  Oregon:  and  Laura,  the  wife  of  C.  R.  Griffith,  brother  of  Frank- 
lin T.  Griffith.  Ann  E.,  the  fifth  child,  was  born  in  1846  and  became  the  wife  of 
W.  B.  Laswell  of  Canyon  City,  her  death  occurring  November  25,  1868.  Sarah  Eveline, 
born  May  1,  1848,  was  married  to  George  A.  Steel,  February  18,  1869,  and  they  reside 
in  Portland.  He  was  at  one  time  state  treasurer.  Georgiana,  the  youngest  member  of 
the  family,  was  born  in  Oregon  City,  November  11,  1852,  and  on  the  25th  of  September, 
1872,  married  Judge  J.  W.  Meldrum,  their  home  being  on  the  farm  near  Oregon  City  or 
Meldrum  station.  She  is  still  living  there.  They  had  three  children:  Charles;  Thomp- 
son;  and  Eva,  who  has  passed  away. 

William  Henry  Pope  was  born  in  New  York  city.  December  5.  1840.  and  was  eleven 
years  old  when  the  voyage  was  made  around  the  Horn  to  their  new  home  in  the  west. 
The  greater  pirt  of  his  education  was  acquired  in  the  public  schools  of  Oregon  City, 
which  he  attended  a  large  part  of  the  ensuing  eight  years  after  his  arrival  in  Oregon. 
In  1859,  when  nineteen  years  old,  he  started  out  in  the  world  for  himself,  first  securing 
employment  as  a  clerk  in  the  commissary  department  of  the  Yakima  Indian  reserva- 
tion, a  position  which  lie  retained  for  three  years,  when  lie  went  to  The  Dalles  and 
for  a  time  worked  in  an  assay  office.  In  1865  he  came  to  Portland  and  was  a  clerk 
in  the  hardware  business  of  Milwain  &  Joint,  and  in  the  same  year  he  purchased, 
in  conjunction  with  his  brother  Charles,  the  oldest  hardware  business  in  Oregon  City, 
which  "h^d  previously  been  conducted  by  O.  Milwain.  It  was  at  this  time  that  the 
father  of  Mr.  Pope  of  this  review  came  to  Oregon  City  and  here  took  charge  of  the 
business  venture  of  his  son,  the  latter,  however,  two  years  later,  himself  locating  in 
Oregon  City  to  look  after  his  own  interests.  For  fourteen  years  Captain  Pope  was 
recognized  as  one  of  the  prominent  and  successful  business  men  of  that  city,  but  in 
1881  he  became  interested  in  the  boating  business  and  again  located  in  Portland,  where 
he  purchased  an  interest  in  a  concern  and  began  his  career  as  a  purser.  That  the  Cap- 
tain was  eminently  fitted  to  deal  with  the  public  was  demonstrated  by  the  many  friends 
which  he  won  during  his  intercourse  of  many  years  and  it  was  but  a  short  time  until 
his  ability  wis  rpcognized  generally  and  he  became  master  of  a  boat.  On  the  14th  of 
May.  1885.  the  Willamette  Steamboat  Company  was  incorporated,  and  Captain  Pope, 
with  others,  built  the  Multnomah  for  the  Oregon  City  route,  and  for  some  time  they 
carried  on  a  thriving  business,  after  which  the  boat  was  leased  to  the  Oregon  Railroad 
&  Navieration  Company,  in  which  latter  employ  he  remained  for  many  years.  The  Cap- 
tain's first  boat  was  called  the  Calliope.     In  May,  1892,  at  the  Centennial  celebration 


92  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

of  the  discovery  of  the  mouth  of  the  Columbia  river,  he  was  master  of  the  Potter  and 
carried  four  hundred  passengers  to  the  scene  of  the  celebration,  where  they  spent  three 
days,  the  9th,  10th  and  11th  ot  May.  The  following  year  he  was  master  of  the  Harvest 
Queen  and  was  engaged  in  piloting  vessels  from  Astoria  to  Portland.  In  1895  he  became 
branch  pilot  on  the  Columbia  and  Willamette  rivers,  which  position  he  continued  to 
fill  the  rest  of  his  life.  His  last  trip  was  the  celebration  of  the  opening  of  the  river 
from  Lewiston  to  the  sea  after  the  locks  were  finished.  No  man  was  ever  more  trusted 
in  this  line  of  work  than  Captain  Pope  and  his  faithful  discharge  of  duty  won  him 
general  commendation. 

The  marriage  of  Captain  Pope  occurred  in  Portland,  February  14,  1S67.  and  united 
him  with  Miss  Sarah  A.  Keightley,  who  was  born  in  La  Grange  county,  Indiana,  June 
30,  1844.  She  was  the  daughter  of  John  and  Mary  (Winter)  Keightley,  the  former  born 
in  1805  and  died  in  1885,  after  an  active  life  as  a  millwright.  His  death  occurred  in 
Indiana  and  his  wife  also  passed  away  in  that  state,  her  demise  occurring  in  1851. 
They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children:  Mrs.  Eliza  Myers  ot  Woodland,  Cali- 
fornia; Mrs.  W.  H.  Pope,  above  mentioned;  John,  who  died  on  the  farm  in  Indiana; 
and  Ann  Walker,  who  died  in  Portland  in  1869,  having  crossed  the  plains  in  1852  with 
her  husband.  Mrs.  Pope  had  come  to  Portland  in  1S60  to  make  her  home  with  her 
sister,  and  she  attended  the  old  academy  for  a  time  in  the  further  pursuit  of  an  educa- 
tion. To  Captain  Pope  and  his  wife  were  born  two  children:  Anna,  born  September 
19,  186S,  married  Paul  S.  Linguist  of  San  Francisco,  and  they  have  two  daughters,  Sarah 
Marie  and  Helen.  Mrs.  Linguist  graduated  from  the  Oregon  City  schools  and  also 
attended  the  high  school  of  Portland.  The  other  daughter  is  Maude,  who  was  born 
February  21,  1874,  and  became  the  wife  of  Captain  Julius  AUyn  of  the  Columbia  river 
pilots.  She  had  two  sons,  William  Pope  who  served  two  years  in  the  World  war  and 
was  at  the  front  with  his  division,  taking  part  at  Argonne  and  in  many  of  the  hard 
fought  battles  with  American  troops.  He  was  at  the  front  when  the  armistice  was 
signed;  and  Edwin  Julius,  who  has  passed  away;  and  one  daughter.  Elizabeth. 

Fraternally  Captain  Pope  was  identified  with  Oregon  City  Lodge.  I.  O.  O.  F.,  and 
the  encampment,  in  both  of  which  he  passed  all  the  chairs  and  was  also  a  member 
of  Oregon  City  Lodge,  A.  0.  U.  W.,  in  which  he  also  passed  all  the  chairs.  As  an  inter- 
ested republican  in  polities  he  was  at  various  times  called  upon  to  represent  his  party, 
serving  for  one  term  as  a  member  of  the  school  board  of  Oregon  City.  His  religious 
affiliation  was  with  the  Taylor  Street  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  of  which  Mrs.  Pope 
is  also  a  member.  Socially  he  was  a  member  of  the  Pioneer  Association  ot  Oregon 
and  the  Historical  Society,  and  in  the  line  of  his  business  belonged  to  and  was  a  charter 
member  ot  the  Masters  and  Pilots  Association  of  Willamette  Harbor.  No.  23.  in  which 
he  passed  all  the  chairs.  Captain  Pope  was  one  of  the  honored  pioneers  of  Oregon, 
to  whom  the  present  generation  owes  a  debt  of  gratitude  that  can  never  be  fully  paid. 
All  were  animated  by  a  common  hope  and  their  confidence  in  the  future  of  the  state 
was  great.  They  were  noble  men  who  were  truly  cast  in  heroic  mould  and  too  much 
cannot  be  said  in  their  honor. 


GEORGE  WASHINGTON  HOYT  (II). 

The  complex  problems  of  banking  are  thoroughly  familiar  to  George  Washington 
Hoyt  (II),  for  comprehensive  study  and  practical  experience  have  acquainted  him  with 
the  various  phases  of  the  business  and  well  qualify  him  for  the  discharge  ot  his  re- 
sponsible duties  as  assistant  cashier  of  the  Northwestern  National  Bank,  one  of  the 
substantial  financial  institutions  of  Portland.  He  has  earned  for  himself  an  enviable 
reputation  as  a  careful  and  capable  man  ot  business  and  in  his  dealings  is  known  for 
his  promptness,  integrity  and  reliability.  He  has  the  distinction  of  being  the  only 
man  among  the  officers  of  the  bank  who  has  spent  over  a  halt  century  in  Portland. 
He  was  here  born  October  15,  1866,  at  the  corner  of  Third  and  Davis  streets  which  at 
that  time  was  a  fashionable  residence  district,  Portland  then  having  a  population  ot 
about  five  thousand  people. 

Mr.  Hoyt  is  a  representative  ot  an  old  and  prominent  pioneer  family  of  this  state 
which  has  been  closely  connected  with  the  early  development  and  upbuilding  of  Oregon. 
His  grandparents  were  Richard  and  Mary  (Cutler)  Hoyt.  who  became  residents  ot  Al- 
bany, New  York,  about  1827.  Both  were  descendants  of  the  early  Puritans,  who  settled 
in  New  Hampshire,  and  the  grandfather  engaged  extensively  in  tlie  manufacture  of  sad- 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  93 

dlery  and  trunks.  George  W.  Hoyt,  the  father  of  the  subject  of  this  review,  from  whom 
he  received  his  name,  was  born  in  Albany  in  182S  and  1851,  when  twenty-three  years  of 
age,  he  made  his  way  to  the  Pacific  coast,  settling  in  California.  The  following  year 
he  came  to  Oregon,  where  he  became  identified  with  navigation  interests,  acting  as 
agent  for  the  Multnomah,  one  of  the  early  steamers  of  the  northwest,  subsequently 
purchasing  an  interest  in  the  steamer  Express  which  made  the  run  between  Portland 
and  Oregon  City.  He  entered  the  employ  of  the  Oregon  Steamship  &  Navigation  Com- 
pany soon  after  its  organization  and  was  identified  with  that  corporation  and  its  suc- 
cessors for  thirty  years — a  just  tribute  to  his  high  business  qualities  and  efficient 
methods.  In  1S90  he  resigned  and  entered  the  custom-house  brokerage  business  in 
connection  with  his  brother,  Henry  Hoyt,  continuing  active  therein  until  his  death  on 
the  9th  of  September,  1892.  Returning  to  Albany  for  his  bride  Captain  Hoyt  was 
married  in  that  city  in  December,  1865,  to  Miss  Martha  A.  Graham  and  they  became 
the  parents  of  three  children:  George  W.,  the  subject  of  this  review;  Martha  A.,  wife 
of  William  D.  Wheelwright;  and  Fannie  Graham,  who  became  the  wife  of  Robert  W. 
Lewis,  of  Portland. 

George  W.  Hoyt  (II)  attended  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  and  was  grad- 
uated from  the  high  school  in  1884.  He  well  remembers  the  great  Centennial  parade 
in  Portland  in  1876,  as  he  carried  a  torch  in  the  procession.  About  this  time  he  was 
printer's  devil  and  A.  D.  T.  messenger  boy  and  when  a  message  was  to  be  delivered 
west  of  Fourth  street  the  company  furnished  a  horse  on  account  of  the  mud.  Owing 
to  his  father's  connection  with  navigation  interests  ilr.  Hoyt  was  naturally  attracted 
to  the  river  and  was  purser  on  the  lower  river  even  before  he  finished  his  high  school 
course.  In  1SS5  he  ran  between  Portland  and  Kalama,  the  boat  connecting  with  the 
Northern  Pacific  Railroad  for  Puget  Sound.  After  spending  a  few  months  on  the  river 
Mr.  Hoyt  became  city  salesman  for  a  large  wholesale  drug  house,  thus  continuing  for 
six  years,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he  returned  to  the  river,  becoming  purser  on  the 
old  Ocean  Wave,  which  plied  between  Portland  and  Ilwaco.  In  those  days  the  Columbia 
was  alive  with  boats  and  barges  of  all  sizes  and  descriptions  and  races  were  frequent 
occurrences. 

In  October,  1892,  Mr.  Hoyt  entered  financial  circles,  becoming  bookkeeper  in  the 
Merchants  National  Bank  and  so  faithfully  and  efficiently  did  he  discharge  his  duties 
in  that  connection  that  he  soon  won  promotion,  advancing  through  all  the  successive 
steps  to  the  position  of  cashier,  in  which  he  was  serving  at  the  time  of  the  amalgama- 
tion with  the  Northwestern  National  Bank  in  October,  1915.  He  is  well  known  through- 
out the  Pacific  northwest  as  an  able  financier  and  banker  of  more  than  ordinary  ability 
who  has  promoted  the  success  of  the  enterprise  with  which  he  is  connected  by  systematic 
and  progressive  work.  He  is  well  versed  in  the  details  of  modern  banking  and  his 
knowledge  is  guided  and  directed  by  his  excellent  business  ability,  and  these  qualities 
have  gained  for  him  the  respect  and  confidence  of  the  men  who  have  had  business  with 
him  and  have  consequently  influenced  the  prosperity  of  the  enterprise  with  which  he  is 
connected. 

In  Portland,  on  the  22d  of  November,  1893,  Mr.  Hoyt  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Pearl  JI.  Shaver,  a  daughter  of  George  W.  and  Sarah  Shaver,  honored  pioneers  of 
this  state.  The  two  children  of  this  union  are  Martha  Shaver  Hoyt  and  George  W. 
Hoyt  (III).  Mr.  Hoyt  has  always  been  a  lover  of  home  and  is  never  happier  than 
when  he  is  with  his  family.  In  1919  he  erected  a  home  at  No.  603  Hillcrest  drive, 
Portland  Heights,  which  commands  a  fine  view  of  the  city  and  surrounding  country. 
His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  fraternally  he  is  Identified 
with  the  Masons,  belonging  to  Imperial  Lodge,  No.  159,  of  which  he  is  serving  as 
treasurer  and  has  also  been  treasurer  of  Portland  Lodge,  No.  142,  B.  P.  0.  E.  He  is 
a  charter  member  of  the  Multnomah  and  Rotary  Clubs,  serving  for  two  years  as  trustee 
of  the  former  organization  while  of  the  latter  he  was  the  first  treasurer  and  he  is  also 
connected  with  the  Commercial  Club.  Throughout  his  life  he  has  been  a  lover  of  music 
and  when  a  young  man  he  played  a  trombone  in  the  Dodsworth  Brass  Band.  He  was 
also  well  known  as  a  vocalist,  being  a  member  of  the  celebrated  Prescott  Quartette  of 
Portland  and  he  also  became  a  member  of  the  first  Boyer  Club.  His  military  experience 
covers  three  and  a  half  years'  service  as  a  member  of  Company  G,  First  Regiment  of 
the  Oregon  National  Guard,  following  which  he  became  identified  with  the  State  Naval 
Militia.  For  over  a  half  century  Mr.  Hoyt  has  resided  in  Portland  and  he  has  there- 
fore been  an  interested  witness  of  the  greater  part  of  the  city's  development  and  up- 
building, bearing  his  full  share  in  the  work  of  progress  and  improvement.  His  mind 
is  stored   with   many   interesting   incidents   of   the  early   days  and  forms  a   connecting 


94  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

link  between  the  primitive  past  with  its  hardsliips  and  privations  of  pioneer  life  and 
the  present  with  its  progress  and  prosperity.  He  is  familiar  with  the  history  of  nearly 
all  of  the  large  business  houses  in  the  city  and  many  of  his  old  schoolmates  are  now 
occupying  positions  of  prominence  here.  The  name  of  Hoyt  has  ever  been  an  honored 
one  in  connection  with  the  pioneer  development  and  later  progress  of  Oregon  and 
George  W.  Hoyt  (II)  is  actuated  by  the  spirit  of  advancement  and  enterprise  which 
dominated  his  forbears  and  which  has  been  a  most  effective  force  in  the  upbuilding  of 
the  west.  He  is  widely  known  throughout  the  Pacific  northwest  and  his  sterling  traits 
of  character  have  gained  for  him  an  enviable  position  in  public  regard. 


INGWERT  C.  NICKELSEN. 


Ingwert  C.  Nickelsen,  a  dealer  in  stationery  and  musical  instruments  and  mer- 
chandise at  The  Dalles,  is  a  Dane  by  birth,  having  been  born  on  the  island  of  Fohr  in 
1842.  His  parents,  Peter  and  Christina  (Petersen)  Nickelsen,  were  born  on  the  same 
farm  as  their  son  Ingwert,  who  was  a  representative  of  the  third  generation  of  the 
family  to  be  born  at  that  place.  He  was  educated  in  his  home  locality  and  came  to 
America  in  1859,  when  a  youth  of  seventeen  years.  Landing  at  New  York,  he  there 
engaged  in  the  restaurant  business  until  1S67.  when  he  decided  to  try  his  fortune  in  the 
west  and  reached  California  after  making  the  trip  by  way  of  Nicaragua.  In  186S  he 
arrived  at  The  Dalles  and  until  1S71  was  employed  at  the  Umatilla  hotel,  which  was 
then  the  only  first-class  hotel  of  The  Dalles.  In  1871  he  estabished  himself  in  business 
on  Second  street  and  for  a  half  century  has  been  one  of  the  leading  merchants  and 
progressive  citizens  of  Wasco  county.  Careful,  conservative  yet  progressive  methods 
and  honorable  dealing  have  led  to  the  development  of  his  establishment  and  the 
growth  of  his  trade  year  by  year.  Mr.  Nickelsen  not  only  conducts  a  fine  stationery 
store  but  has  also  added  a  musical  department,  in  which  is  displayed  a  full  line  of 
musical  instruments  and  musical  merchandise.  He  carries  the  standard  makes  of 
pianos  and  other  musical  instruments  and  is  likewise  agent  for  the  Victrola,  having 
a  large  stock  of  talking  machines  and  records.  He  has  ever  made  it  his  purpose  to 
please  his  patrons,  recognizing  the  fact  that  satisfied  customers  are  the  best  advertise- 
ment, and  in  the  conduct   of  his  business  has  achieved  most  gratifying  results. 

In  1S72  Mr,  Nickelsen  was  married  to  Miss  Josine  Fredden,  daughter  of  Jorgen 
and  Gardine  Fredden  and  also  a  native  of  the  island  of  Fohr,  Denmark.  They  have 
three  children:  Christina,  the  wife  of  Henry  Grubb  of  The  Dalles;  Julia,  the  wife  of 
Ernest  Cramer;  and  Clara,  the  wife  of  Frank  N.  Parker,  an  officer  of  the  valuation 
department  of  the  Interstate  Commerce  Commission  and  a  resident  of  Washington, 
D.  C. 

Throughout  his  life  Mr.  Nickelsen  has  been  a  consistent  Christian  and  he  was 
one  of  the  organizers  of  the  English  Lutheran  church,  of  which  he  is  a  councilor.  For 
many  years  he  served  as  treasurer  of  his  congregation  and  at  all  times  has  given  lib- 
erally to  its  support  and  put  forth  every  possible  effort  for  the  upbuilding  of  the 
church  and  the  extension  of  its  infiuence.  For  a  half  century  he  has  been  connected 
with  the  Odd  Fellows  and  is  a  past  grand  of  his  lodge.  His  political  allegiance  is  given 
to  the  republican  party  and  from  1885  until  1S88  he  was  treasurer  of  Wasco  county. 
He  has  always  been  numbered  among  the  most  public-spirited  citizens  of  The  Dalles 
and  his  efforts  have  been  a  constructive  force  in  the  community,  his  activities  produc- 
ing far-reaching  and  beneficial  results  in  behalf  of  public  progress. 


JOHN  A.  BRADBURN,  Jr. 

John  A.  Bradburn,  Jr.,  who  was  for  many  years  prominent  in  the  mercantile 
circles  of  Pilot  Rock,  is  now  living  in  retirement,  enjoying  the  fruits  of  a  life  spent 
in  diligence  and  labor.  A  native  of  Oregon,  he  was  born  near  Echo,  February  17,  1872, 
a  son  of  John  A..  Sr..  and  Louisa  V.  (Short)  Bradburn,  the  former  a  native  of  Cum- 
mins, Massachusetts,  and  the  latter  of  Virden,  Illinois.  They  were  married  in  Umatilla 
county,  November  28,  1860.  They  had  five  children,  four  boys  and  one  girl,  and  all 
are  deceased  except  John  A.  and  Frank  L.  When  a  small  boy,  John  A.  Bradburn,  Sr., 
went  east  with  his  parents,  locating  in  New  York.     He  later  removed  to  Independence, 


HISTOKY  OF  OREGON  97 

Missouri,  where  until  1849  he  engaged  as  a  sailor  on  a  Missouri  river  steamboat.  In 
that  year,  however,  he  crossed  the  plains,  stopping  at  Salt  Lake  City  and  there  he 
numbered  among  his  acquaintances  the  well  known  Mormon  leader,  Brigham  Young. 
Leaving  Salt  Lake  City,  Mr.  Bradburn  went  to  Sacramento,  California,  and  then 
for  some  time  engaged  in  mining  near  Oroville,  that  state.  He  then  located  on  the 
American  river  in  connection  with  a  number  of  men,  where  they  successfully  operated 
a  sawmill  but  in  the  spring  of  1851  he  left  this  vicinity  and  removing  to  Oregon, 
located  in  Portland  for  a  short  time  and  then  at  The  Dalles,  where  he  assisted  in  the 
construction  of  the  first  stone  warehouse  there.  In  1852  he  came  to  what  is  now  Uma- 
tilla county.  Settling  in  Umatilla  county  he  located  near  where  Echo  now  stands  and 
there  engaged  in  the  hotel  business,  also  running  stock  and  conducting  an  inn  at  Wells 
Springs.  He  operated  a  ferry-boat  in  connection  with  his  other  business  interests, 
achieving  a  substantial  amount  of  success  in  each  undertaking.  In  1878  he  sold  the 
ranch  and  started  to  drive  some  two  thousand  cattle  to  Burnt  river  but  the  Indians 
attacked  the  party  and  killed  a  number  of  the  cattle,  so  he  abandoned  that  enterprise. 
Buying  the  ranch  of  a  Mr.  Nail  on  the  southern  edge  of  the  reservation,  he  farmed 
and  ran  stock  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1891,  at  the  age  of  sixty-four  years. 
His  wife  died  at  Lehman  Springs,  when  forty-six  years  of  age.  Throughout  his  life 
John  A.  Bradburn,  Sr.,  was  a  stanch  supporter  of  the  republican  party  and  he  was 
readily  conceded  to  be  a  representative  citizen  of  the  community  in  which  he  resided. 

The  boyhood  of  John  A.  Bradburn,  Jr.,  was  spent  in  Umatilla  county,  where  he 
received  his  education  and  later  worked  for  the  Cunningham  Sheep  &  Land  Company. 
He  was  then  engaged  in  the  liquor  business  and  until  the  spring  of  1920  was  active 
in  the  conduct  of  a  confectionery  business  at  Pilot  Rock,  in  which  he  achieved  a  sub- 
stantial amount  of  success.  Mr.  Bradburn  has  been  prominent  in  various  business 
ventures  and  he  is  the  owner  of  a  concrete  garage,  a  barber  shop,  a  restaurant  and  a 
rooming  house,  as  well  as  other  valuable  property  in  Pilot  Rock.  He  is  now  living 
retired  in  the  residence  which  he  erected  in  Pilot  Rock.  As  a  representative  of  some 
of  that  town's  most  important  business  interests,  Mr.  Bradburn  has  taken  an  active 
part  in  the  civic  affairs  of  the  community  and  to  that  end  has  served  on  the  city  council. 

In  1913  occurred  the  marriage  of  John  A.  Bradburn,  Jr.,  to  Miss  Emma  Kesel, 
daughter  of  Jacob  and  Elizabeth  Kesel,  and  a  native  of  Utah.  Mrs.  Bradburn  passed 
away  on  the  12th  of  February,  1919,  at  the  age  of  thirty-eight  years,  her  death  causing 
a  void  in  the  community  which  it  will  not  be  easy  to  fill. 

The  political  allegiance  of  Mr.  Bradburn  is  given  to  the  republican  party,  in  the 
interests  of  which  he  takes  an  active  part.  He  is  not  affiliated  with  a  great  number 
of  fraternal  organizations  but  holds  membership  with  the  Red  Men.  He  is  Justly 
entitled  to  the  proud  American  title  of  self-made  man,  for  all  that  he  today  possesses 
has  been  acquired  through  his  own  labor,  economy  and  well  directed  efforts. 


GRANT  B.   DIMICK. 


There  is  perhaps  no  other  man  in  the  state  of  Oregon  who  occupies  at  the  bar,  in 
civil  life  and  in  business  and  fraternal  circles  such  an  enviable  position  as  Judge  Grant 
B.  Dimick.  This  distinguished  man  is  a  son  of  John  B.  and  Almira  Eberhard  Dimick, 
and  was  born  in  1869,  at  Hubbard,  Oregon.  His  father  was  born  in  Illinois  in  1840, 
and  at  the  age  of  seven  years  removed  to  Oregon.  He  later  became  a  farmer  but  left 
his  farm  for  a  while  during  the  Civil  war.  At  the  close  of  the  war  he  returned  to 
Marion  county  and  resumed  farming  and  in  1886  was  elected  to  the  state  senate.  He 
led  a  life  of  diligence  and  industry  to  the  time  of  his  death,  which  took  place  in  1903. 
The  mother's  family,  the  Eberhards,  were  pioneers  of  Oregon,  having  come  here  in 
1852,  and  were  a  prominent  family  in  the  state. 

Judge  Dimick's  education  was  received  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  town, 
at  the  State  Normal  School  and  at  the  Baptist  College  at  McMinnville.  He  then  studied 
law  and  was  admitted  to  practice  by  the  supreme  court  in  1895  and  in  1896  he  removed 
to  Oregon  City.  He  served  as  mayor  of  Oregon  City  for  five  terms  and  was  republican 
presidential  elector  in  1906.  He  has  been  county  judge  of  Clackamas  county  and  in 
1910  was  candidate  for  governor  of  Oregon.  To  him  the  state  owes  much  of  its  progres- 
siveness.  for  it  was  he  who  organized  and  built  the  Willamette  Valley  &  Southern  Rail- 
way which  has  been  a  large  factor  in  the  development  of  the  section  through  which  it 
runs.     This  railway  owes  its  success  to  his  untiring  efforts   as  president  and   general 


98  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

manager  of  its  company.  In  another  line  he  has  become  just  as  successful  and  having 
studied  farming  from  a  scientific  standpoint  he  now  owns  and  operates  some  five  hun- 
dred and  thirty-three  acres  on  which  he  raises  Hampshire,  Shropshire  and  Oxford  Down 
sheep.  He  is  a  member  of  the  State  Bar  Association,  is  general  attorney  for  the  Hawley 
Pulp  and  Paper  Company,  is  vice  president  of  the  State  Bank  at  Monitor  and  is  director 
of  the  State  Bank  of  Aurora. 

In  1896  Judge  Dimick  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Verene  Wolfer,  who  belongs 
to  one  of  the  pioneer  families  of  Clackamas  county  and  the  vacations  of  Judge  and 
Mrs.  Dimick  are  for  the  most  part  spent  on  one  of  their  three  large  farms. 

Though  almost  submerged  with  legal  and  business  duties  Judge  Dimick  has  found 
some  time  for  the  social  amenities  of  life  and  has  many  fraternal  connections.  He  Is 
a  thirty-second  degree  Mason,  and  is  now  master  of  Multnomah  Lodge,  No.  1,  which  is 
the  oldest  lodge  west  of  the  Rockies  and  he  is  also  a  Noble  of  the  Mystic  Shrine. 


A.   H.   BIRRELL. 


Thirty  years  have  been  added  to  the  cycle  of  the  centuries  since  A.  H.  Birrell  began 
business  in  Portland  in  the  field  of  real  estate,  mortgage  loans  and  insurance.  A 
thorough  understanding  of  every  phase  of  the  lines  of  business  which  he  handles,  close 
application  and  unremitting  energy  have  been  salient  features  in  his  career.  In  all  his 
business  activities  he  has  followed  constructive  effort,  never  seeking  to  build  up  his 
own  fortunes  by  tearing  down  the  business  of  others:  in  fact  he  has  always  held  to 
high  business  standards  and  ethics  and  enjoys  in  a  large  measure  the  confidence  and 
esteem  of  those  with  whom  he  has  been  brought  into  contact. 

Mr.  Birrell  is  a  native  of  Scotland,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Dundee,  Decem- 
ber 20,  1S60,  his  parents  being  John  and  Jane  Birrell.  His  father  was  prominent  in 
educational  circles  in  Scotland,  having  conducted  a  large  private  academy  in  Dundee 
and  it  was  in  that  institution  that  his  son,  Alexander,  pursued  his  studies  until  he  had 
reached  a  point  when  he  felt  that  he  wished  to  make  his  initial  step  in  business  circles. 
For  seven  years  he  was  employed  in  the  office  of  a  jute  manufacturer  in  Dundee  and 
then,  attracted  by  the  opportunities  of  the  new  world,  made  his  way  across  the  Atlantic 
and  landed  at  the  eastern  metropolis,  being  at  that  time  twenty-two  years  of  age. 
After  a  brief  period  spent  in  the  carpet  house  of  W.  and  J.  Sloan  of  New  York,  he 
started  for  the  west,  making  Clifton,  Arizona,  his  destination.  There  he  was  employed 
for  a  time  as  bookkeeper  by  the  Arizona  Copper  Company  and  the  following  year,  when 
twenty-three  years  of  age,  he  became  accountant  for  the  Dundee  Mortgage  Company, 
succeeding  to  the  joint  agency  of  that  company  in  Portland,  Oregon,  in  18SS.  For  four- 
teen years  thereafter  he  was  a  member  of  the  firm  of  MacMaster  &  Birrell,  represent- 
ing English  and  Scotch  capital  in  Portland  in  making  mortgage  loans  on  both  city 
and  farm  property.  This  business  constituted  an  important  element  in  the  develop- 
ment of  Portland  and  of  Oregon.  In  April,  1903,  Mr.  Birrell  opened  an  office  for  the 
conducting  of  a  real  estate,  insurance  and  financial  agency  and  had  soon  gained  a 
large  clientage.  In  190S  the  A.  H.  Birrell  Company  was  incorporated,  which  in  turn 
was  succeeded  on  January  1st,  1921,  by  the  A.  H.  Birrell-Gill  Company.  In  both  of 
these  corporations  he  is  president:  in  the  latter,  W.  J.  Gill,  an  old  time  Portlander. 
is  associated  with  him  as  vice  president.  Indefatigable  energy,  persistency  of  pur- 
pose and  sound  business  judgment  have  characterized  his  business  career  and  as  the 
years  have  passed  he  has  won  a  substantial  place  in  the  business  and  financial  circles 
of  his  adopted  city. 

Mr.  Birrell  was  married  in  Mlddletown,  Ohio,  on  the  13th  of  May,  1886,  to  Miss 
Christina  K.  Shartle  and  to  them  have  been  born  two  daughters:  Esther,  who  is  now 
the  wife  of  Newton  C.  Smith,  of  Portland,  and  Winifred,  the  wife  of  J.  Hunt  Hendrick- 
son   of  Portland. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Birrell  is  an  Elk.  He  belongs  also  to  the  Arlington  Club  of 
Portland  and  to  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  being  keenly  interested  in  the  efforts  of 
the  latter  organization  to  develop  the  city  in  all  of  its  varied  trade  relations  and  to 
uphold  its  civic  standards.  He  votes  with  the  republican  party,  which  he  has  sup- 
ported since  becoming  an  American  citizen.  He  is  prominently  identified  with  varr 
ous  Scotch  societies  in  his  community  and  has  been  the  president  of  the  St.  Andrews' 
Society  of  Oregon.     His  religious  faith   is  that  of  the  Episcopal  church. 

A   contemporary   writer   has   said   of   him:    "His   life   has   been   well   spent,   charac- 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  99 

terized  by  conservation  of  his  forces,  by  utilization  of  opportunity  and  by  correct 
understanding  of  life's  values  and  purposes.  The  strength  that  he  has  manifested 
in  business  circles  has  its  root  in  upright,  honorable  manhood,  winning  for  him  the 
unqualified  regard  of  those  with  whom  he  has  been  associated." 


WILLIAM  ARTHUR  JOHNSTON. 

William  Arthur  Johnston  of  The  Dalles,  who  is  affectionately  called  "Bill"  John- 
ston by  his  friends  who  are  to  be  found  throughout  the  state  of  Oregon,  was  born  in 
Ohio  in  1S60.  his  parents  being  J.  S.  and  Samantha  (Story)  Johnston,  who  were  repre- 
sentatives of  pioneer  families  that  had  settled  in  the  northwest  territory  in  the  days 
of  the  "Ohio  Company,"  long  before  the  organization  of  the  state  of  Ohio.  They  were 
of  New  England  migratory  stock.  The  father  died  when  the  son,  William  A.,  was 
seven  years  of  age  and  the  boy  was  afterward  indentured  to  a  farmer,  the  contract 
covering  the  period  of  his  minority.  The  boy,  however,  felt  that  this  period  was  too 
great  and  at  the  age  of  eighteen  years  he  started  for  the  Pacific  coast,  possessing  a  capi- 
tal of  a  little  less  than  four  dollars  after  paying  his  way  on  an  emigrant  train  to  San 
Francisco.  The  trip  to  that  city  took  twelve  days  and  after  reaching  the  Golden  Gate 
the  boy  at  once  started  for  Portland.  Oregon,  by  steamer.  Upon  arriving  at  the  latter 
city  he  sought  employment  and  secured  a  job  at  Corvallis,  where  he  worked  as  a  farm 
hand  and  cattle  buyer.  He  then  became  a  logger  in  Lane  county.  His  next  move 
took  him  to  Roseburg,  Oregon,  where  he  assisted  in  building  the  first  railroad  bridge 
across  the  Umpqua  river.  He  spent  some  time  in  logging  near  Cottage  Grove  and  then 
again  sought  a  different  location,  arriving  this  time  at  The  Dalles,  in  1883,  where  he 
accepted  a  position  as  engine  wiper  with  the  Oregon  Railway  &  Navigation  Company. 
This  task,  however,  did  not  prove  congenial  and  he  removed  to  Prineville,  where  for 
six  months  he  clerked  in  a  grocery  store.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  returned 
to  The  Dalles  and  for  four  years  acted  as  foreman  of  a  logging  camp.  Removing  to 
Heppner,  Oregon,  he  again  engaged  in  the  grocery  business.  He  later  resolved  to  engage 
in  business  on  his  own  account  and  opened  a  drug  store  at  Heppner,  of  which  he  re- 
mained the  owner  for  two  and  a  half  years.  He  then  sold  out  and  through  the  suc- 
ceeding two  years  was  associated  with  Minor  &  Company,  a  general  merchandise 
store.  He  returned  to  The  Dalles,  where  he  opened  a  grocery  store  which  he  soon 
developed  into  a  department  store  which  he  conducted  for  twelve  years.  Since  closing 
out  his  general  merchandise  business  he  has  in  a  measure  lived  retired,  although  he 
has  many  interests  in  and  around  Wasco  county.  He  holds  a  considerable  amount  of 
stock  in  the  large  general  merchandise  business  of  Johnston  Brothers  of  Dufur,  who, 
though  of  the  same  name,  are  not  related  to  him  by  the  ties  of  blood.  He  is  associated 
with  his  son,  Charles  A.,  in  the  automobile  business  under  the  firm  name  of  W.  A. 
Johnston  &  Son.  He  was  for  a  time  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  the  Kimball  culti- 
vator, but  the  war  forced  the  closing  of  the  factory  for  lack  of  material  and  work  has 
not  yet  been  resumed.  The  garage  and  salesrooms  of  W.  A.  Johnston  &  Son  are  on 
Second  street  in  The  Dalles,  being  situated  on  the  Columbia  River  highway  and  fitted 
up  with  all  modern  conveniences.  The  firm  acts  as  distributor  for  the  Nash  motor  cars 
for  nine  counties  tributary  to  The  Dalles  and  carries  a  full  line  of  automobile  tires 
and   accessories. 

Mr.  Johnston  was  married  in  1888  to  Miss  Lillle  Ballard,  a  daughter  of  William 
G.  Ballard,  who  came  to  Oregon  in  1850  from  his  native  state  of  Illinois.  He  was  a 
direct  descendant  of  Thomas  Ballard,  a  Scotchman  who  landed  in  America  in  1748, 
settling  at  Charleston,  South  Carolina.  Mrs.  Johnston's  mother  was  a  Dunbar.  Her 
father  became  a  pioneer  resident  of  Oregon,  coming  to  this  state  from  Virginia  in  1850. 
His  farm  at  Fairview  was  one  of  the  first  developed  in  the  state  and  the  Multnomah 
County  Poor  Farm  is  a  part  of  his  original  ranch. 

Mr.  Johnston  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  one  of  the  best  known 
representatives  of  the  craft  in  Oregon.  He  has  passed  through  most  of  the  chairs,  is 
a  past  high  priest  of  the  chapter  and  a  past  commander  of  Columbia  Commandery, 
No.  13,  K.  T.  He  is  also  the  deputy  potentate  of  Al  Kader  Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine 
and  no  Mason  stands  higher  in  the  order  nor  has  more  friends  among  its  membership 
than  "Bill"  Johnston.  His  chapter  has  presented  him  with  a  gold  embroidered  apron 
and  his  commandery  with  a  jeweled  emblem  as  a  slight  token  of  their  appreciation 
of  his  work  and  in  recognition  of  his  popularity. 


I  HISTORY  OF  ORECiOX 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Johnston  have  one  son,  Charles  A.,  who  is  a  partner  in  the  automobile 
He  is  married  and  has  a  son,  William  Arthur.  Jr.,  who  is  five  years  of  age 
and  has  already  commenced  his  journey  along  Masonic  lines,  having  been  appointed 
one  of  the  two  mascots  of  Al  Kader  Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  at  Portland.  When 
attired  in  his  Arab  costume,  topped  with  his  fez,  he  commands  the  attention  of  all  of 
the  five  thousand  Nobles  of  the  Shrine.  Long  a  resident  of  the  northwest  and  active 
in  various  lines  of  business  and  at  various  points,  and  equally  prominent  in  his  fra- 
ternal associations,  Mr.  Johnston  is  indeed  widely  known  throughout  Oregon  and  the 
sterling  worth  of  his  character,  his  unfeigned  cordiality  and  his  appreciation  of  friend- 
ship have  gained  for  him  the  high  regard  and  warm  esteem  of  all  with  whom  he  has 
been  brought  into  contact. 


CHARLES  TYLER  EARLY. 


There  is  perhaps  no  history  in  this  volume  that  indicates  so  clearly  the  possibili- 
ties that  lie  before  the  American  youth  as  does  that  of  Charles  Tyler  Early,  the  vice 
president  and  general  manager  of  the  Oregon  Lumber  Company  and  one  of  the  most 
prominent  lumbermen  of  the  Pacific  coast  country.  He  started  out  in  connection  with 
the  lumber  business  at  the  commonest  kinds. of  labor  and  upon  the  substantial  qualities 
of  industry,  determination  and  faithfulness  has  builded  his  notable  success.  There  are 
many  who  claim  that  opportunity  is  much  more  limited  than  it  was  a  generation  ago. 
The  careers  of  such  men  as  Mr.  Early  indicate  the  futility  of  such  a  statement.  Busi- 
ness lines  are  constantly  broadening  and  opportunities  are  continually  increasing  and 
to  the  individual  fortune  will  yield  her  rewards  in  return  tor  persistency  of  purpose 
and  effort,  intelligently  directed. 

Charles  T.  Early  was  born  in  Somerset,  Kentucky,  August  3,  1869,  a  son  of  Grant 
S.  Early  and  a  descendant  of  old  Virginia  stock,  being  distantly  related  to  General  Jubal 
A.  Early.  He  obtained  a  high  school  education  but  had  no  means  which  would  enable 
him  to  pursue  a  college  course.  In  fact  while  he  was  still  a  student  in  the  public  schools 
he  worked  on  a  farm  during  the  summer  months  for  fifteen  dollars  per  month  and 
did  chores  in  the  winter  seasons  for  his  board  while  attending  school.  He  thus  early 
displayed  the  elemental  strength  of  his  character  and  soon  came  to  a  realization  of 
the  eternal  principle  voiced  by  the  Greek  sage  Epicharmus:  "Earn  thy  reward;  the 
gods  give  naught  to  sloth."  He  secured  a  most  humble  position  in  connection  with 
the  lumber  industry  and  his  life  story  since  that  has  been  one  of  steady  advancement, 
won  through  hard  work.  Step  by  step  he  has  progressed  until  he  has  reached  the 
position  of  vice  president  and  general  manager  of  one  of  the  leading  lumber  concerns 
in  Oregon,  which  was  founded  in  1S8S  by  the  late  David  Eccles,  many  times  a  mil- 
lionaire and  responsible  for  much  of  Oregon's  development.  He  became  confidential 
man  of  what  was  known  as  the  Eccles  Interests,  controlling  the  Oregon  Lumber  Com- 
pany, the  Mount  Hood  Railroad  Company  and  the  Sumpter  Valley  Railway.  His  official 
designation  at  the  present  time  is  that  of  vice  president  and  general  manager  of  the 
Oregon  Lumber  Company  and  also  of  the  Oregon  American  Lumber  Company  and  the 
Mount  Hood  Railroad  Company  and  he  is  assistant  to  the  president  of  the  Sumpter 
Valley  Railway  Company.  Thus  he  has  come  into  positions  of  administrative  direction 
and  executive  control  and  is  bending  his  efforts  to  constructive  work  in  the  manage- 
ment of  the  mammoth  business  now  under  his  guidance. 

At  Hood  River.  Oregon,  on  the  30th  of  April,  1S91,  Mr.  Early  was  married  to  Miss 
Edith  C.  Blowers,  a  daughter  of  Amby  S.  Blowers  and  a  descendant  of  Sir  Samuel  Salter 
Blowers,  one  of  the  early  chief  justices  of  Nova  Scotia.  On  the  maternal  side  she 
comes  of  French  ancestry.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Early  have  become  the  parents  of  a  son, 
Roy  B. 

Mr.  Early's  military  record  is  limited  to  service  with  Company  D  of  the  Oregon 
National  Guard  at  Hood  River.  In  politics  he  is  a  republican  and  is  usually  active 
in  furthering  the  interests  of  the  party.  He  has  no  hesitancy  in  expressing  his  views 
on  any  subject  and  can  be  relied  upon  absolutely  by  his  friends.  He  fights  fair  and 
when  the  bittle  is  over  all  is  forgotten.  He  has  held  only  minor  public  offices  but  the 
records  show  efficiency  in  service,  the  ofl^ces  being  conducted  purely  on  a  business  basis. 
His  activity  in  politics,  however,  has  been  largely  limited  to  his  interest  for  others, 
an  interest  followed  by  a  large  degree  of  success.  Fraternally  he  is  a  member  of  the 
Masonic  order  and  also  of  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.     He  belongs  to  the 


CHARLES   T.   EARLY 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  103 

Arlington  Club,  to  the  Portland  Chamber  of  Commerce,  to  the  Transportation  Club,  the 
Portland  Realty  Board,  the  Automobile  Club  and  the  Portland  Golf  Club — associations 
which  Indicate  much  concerning  the  nature  of  his  interests  and  his  social  activities. 
He  makes  liberal  contributions  to  the  support  of  religious  work  and  is  keenly  interested 
in  all  that  pertains  to  the  public  welfare,  having  never  allowed  the  attainment  of 
success  in  any  way  to  warp  his  kindly  nature  nor  dwarf  his  sensibilities  concerning 
his  public  duties. 


JOHN  ENERY. 


In  the  period  of  pioneer  development  in  the  northwest  John  Enery  came  to  this 
section  of  the  country  and  Portland  long  numbered  him  as  one  of  her  substantial  citi- 
zens. The  width  of  the  country  separated  him  from  his  birthplace,  for  he  was  born 
in  Dedham,  Massachusetts,  in  1S35,  a  son  of  Arthur  Enery.  The  lure  of  the  sea  caused 
him  to  run  away  from  home  when  a  young  lad  and  for  several  years  he  followed  the 
sea,  but  afterward  abandoned  maritime  interests  in  order  to  come  to  the  west.  Mak- 
ing his  way  to  Idaho  and  to  Oregon  he  engaged  in  mining  in  both  states  and  also  did 
freighting  with  mule  teams  between  The  Dalles  and  Cilola  for  several  winters,  while 
the  summer  months  were  devoted  to  work  in  the  mines. 

In  the  year  1S68  Mr.  Enery  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Riley  and 
soon  afterwards  came  to  Portland,  where  he  established  a  boot  and  shoe  business. 
Later  he  extended  the  scope  of  his  activities  to  include  general  merchandising  and 
owned  and  conducted  his  store  until  the  big  fire  of  1872,  which  entirely  wiped  out 
his  place  of  business,  he  losing  both  the  building  and  the  stock,  upon  which  he  had  no 
insurance.  Mr.  Enery  then  went  to  Bellevue  in  Yamhill  county,  and  opened  a  general 
merchandise  store,  which  he  conducted  for  about  five  years.  He  sold  his  business 
there  and  bought  a  farm  in  Happy  Valley  in  Yamhill  county,  where  he  spent  two  win- 
ters. He  afterward  disposed  of  the  property  and  took  up  his  abode  at  McMinnville, 
Oregon,  while  still  later  he  went  to  Lafayette,  where  he  purchased  a  small  farm 
upon  which  he  resided  for  six  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  returned  to 
Portland,  taking  up  his  abode  on  Third  street,  where  the  family  home  is  still  main- 
tained. Here  he  purchased  considerable  property,  including  the  present  home  site 
and  about  ten  acres  of  land  on  Portland  Heights  which  has  become  very  valuable.  His 
investment  was  most  wisely  and  judiciously  made,  for  the  land  has  steadily  increased 
in  value,  making  his  estate  one  of  worth. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Enery  were  born  tour  children:  Alice  became  the  wife  of  Harry 
C.  Stuart,  who  passed  away  June  17,  1915,  leaving  his  widow,  while  their  only  child 
died  in  infancy.  Harry  C.  Stuart  was  a  son  of  Captain  A.  B.  Stuart,  well  known  in 
the  northwest.  The  other  members  of  the  Enery  family,  Minnie,  Julia  and  Arthur 
have  all  passed  away.  The  father  died  October  18,  1915,  while  the  mother's  death 
occurred  August  29,  1S99,  and  thus  Mrs.  Stuart  is  the  only  surviving  member  of  this 
honored  pioneer  family  of  the  northwest.  In  his  political  view  Mr.  Enery  was  a 
democrat  but  was  never  an  office  seeker,  preferring  always  to  concentrate  his  efforts 
and  attention  upon  his  business  affairs.  He  was  highly  esteemed  wherever  he  was 
known  and  enjoyed  the  confidence  and  warm  regard  of  all  with  whom  he  was  associated. 


ORVAL  DUDLEY  BURKE. 

Orval  Dudley  Burke,  president  of  the  Klamath  State  Bank  of  Klamath  Falls, 
was  born  in  Ohio  in  185S,  a  son  of  I.  P.  and  Mary  (Skeels)  Burke.  His  father  en- 
gaged in  farming  in  that  state  for  some  time,  later  removing  to  Kansas,  where,  like 
members  of  his  wife's  family,  he  became  one  of  the  early  pioneers. 

Orval  Dudley  Burke  attended  the  district  schools,  at  a  distance  of  two  miles  from 
the  home  farm  and  at  the  same  time  assisted  his  father  with  the  chores.  When  nineteen 
years  of  age  he  conducted  a  general  mercantile  store  for  his  father  and  at  twenty-six 
became  a  traveling  salesman  for  a  wholesale  dry  goods  company,  in  whose  services 
he  remained  for  the  next  three  years,  when  he  purchased  a  store  at  Central  City, 
Nebraska,  and  operated  it  successfully  for  the  next  eighteen  years.  Tiring  of  the 
mercantile  business  at  the  end  of  that  time,  he  sold  his  store  and  entered  the  banking 


104  IIISTOKY  OF  OREGON 

business.  Upon  looking  around  for  a  location  he  finally  selected  Klamath  Falls  and, 
removing  to  that  city  in  1917,  organized  the  Klamath  State  Bank,  of  which  institution 
he  was  elected  president,  an  office  he  still  holds.  At  the  time  of  organization  the  bank 
had  a  capital  stock  of  fifty  thousand  dollars,  which  has  been  increased  to  one  hundred 
and   fifty  thousand,  while  the  deposits  have  grown  to   even  larger  proportions. 

In  1894  Mr.  Burke  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Donzella  Wolcott  of  Central 
City,  Nebraska,  who  is  a  member  of  a  prominent  pioneer  family  of  Iowa.  Her  brother, 
W.  W.  Wolcott.  is  colonel  of  the  National  Guard  of  Nebraska,  and  another  brother, 
Hon.  R.  M.  Wolcott  was  for  many  years  president  of  the  Nebraska  State  Fair.  Two 
children  have  been  born  to  Mr.  and  -Mrs.  Burke:  Percy  V.,  who  is  office  manager  of 
the  Growers  Packing  &  Warehousing  Company;  and  Mildred,  the  wife  of  Louis  Hoagland. 
Percy  volunteered  in  the  early  days  of  the  World  war  and  was  assigned  to  the  signal 
corps  of  the  Sixteenth  Field  artillery.  He  trained  at  Camp  Green  and  was  sent  to 
France,  serving  in  all  of  the  major  engagements  of  the  American  Expeditionary  Forces. 
He  was  also  a  member  of  the  Army  of  Occupation,  being  stationed  at  Coblenz,  Ger- 
many. He  is  a  graduate  of  York  College  and  quite  an  athlete,  being  especially  fond 
of  football.  Though  one  of  the  leaders  in  athletic  sports  during  his  college  days, 
he  never  allowed  it  to  interfere  with  his  studies  and  was  graduated  with  honor.  Mrs. 
Burke  is  treasurer  of  the  guild  of  the  Episcopal  church,  which  is  the  religious  faith 
of  the  entire  family,  and  she  is  also  prominent  in  the  club  and  social  circles  of  Klamath 
Falls. 

During  his  residence  in  Central  City,  Mr.  Burke  was  a  member  of  the  city  council 
and  a  supervisor  but  since  locating  in  Klamath  Falls  has  devoted  all  of  his  time  to 
his  business  interests  and  his  family.  He  has  no  fraternal  affiliations.  He  has,  by 
his  honorable  business  methods  and  public  spirit,  made  many  friends  who  appreciate 
him  as  a  man  of  genuine  personal  worth.  As  a  banker,  while  cautious  in  the  handling 
of  depositors'  money,  he  has  always  been  ready  to  lend  a  helping  hand  to  all  worthy 
business  enterprises  and  has  sought  to  operate  his  bank  as  one  of  helpful  service.  His 
interest  in  civic  affairs  is  beyond  question,  there  being  no  project  of  interest  to  the  com- 
munity but  finds  in  him  a  stanch  supporter. 


BERT  EMORY  HANEY. 


Ever  holding  to  high  professional  ideals,  Bert  Emory  Haney  has  gained  distinction 
as  a  representative  of  the  Oregon  bar.  practicing  in  Portland.  He  is  a  native  of  this 
state,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Lafayette,  April  10,  1S79,  his  parents  being  among 
the  pioneer  settlers  of  Oregon.  His  father,  John  Haney,  was  born  in  Springfield, 
Massachusetts,  in  1S50  and  came  to  the  northwest  in  1875,  settling  in  Lafayette.  He 
had  been  a  soldier  of  the  United  States  army  for  five  years  and  was  in  various 
Indian  wars  in  the  west  between  1869  and  1874.  After  taking  up  his  abode  in  La- 
fayette he  wedded  Mar\'  Harris  and   in  18S9  he  was  called  to  his  final  rest. 

Bert  E.  Haney  spent  his  youthful  days  at  the  place  of  his  nativity  and  after  at- 
tending the  public  schools  there  continued  his  education  in  the  Willamette  Univer- 
sity but  did  not  complete  the  full  course.  Taking  up  the  study  of  law,  he  was  graduated 
in  1903  from  the  law  department  of  the  University  of  Oregon  and  then  opened  an 
office  in  Portland,  where  he  has  since  remained.  Advancement  at  the  bar  is  proverbially 
slow.  Success  in  this  profession  can  be  gained  only  through  individual  merit  and 
effort.  Recognizing  this,  Mr.  Haney  has  devoted  himself  assiduously  to  the  mastery 
of  all  legal  problems  in  connection  with  the  litigation  entrusted  to  his  care  and  his 
preparation  of  cases  has  at  all  times  been  thorough  and  exhaustive.  From  1904  until 
190S  he  held  the  position  of  deputy  district  attorney  for  Multnomah  county  and  then 
concentrated  his  attention  upon  private  practice  until  January,  1918.  when  he  was 
made  United  States  attorney  for  Oregon  and  filled  that  position  until  December.  1919. 
being  connected  with  many  cases  which  arose  out  of  conditions  brought  about  by  the 
World  war. 

On  the  21st  of  November.  1906,  In  Salem,  Oregon,  Mr.  Haney  was  married  to  Miss 
Jessie  A.  Holmes,  a  daughter  of  W.  H.  Holmes,  and  they  have  one  son,  John  Robert, 
who  was  born  in  190S.  Mr.  Haney  has  been  a  stanch  advocate  of  democratic  principles 
since  age  conferred  upon  him  the  right  of  franchise.  Fraternally  he  is  connected  with 
the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  the  nature  of  his  interests  is  further 
shown  in  his  connection  with  the  University  Club  and  with  the  Chamber  of  Commerce. 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  105 

His  support  can  at  all  times  be  counted  upon  to  further  any  plan  or  project  for  the 
general  good  and  he  is  interested  in  every  movement  that  has  to  do  with  civic  virtue 
and  civic  pride. 


DR.  WALTER  QUENTIN  TUCKER. 

A  descendant  of  the  son  of  an  English  governor  of  Bermuda  who  settled  in  Vir- 
ginia and  served  in  the  American  Revolution  under  General  Francis  Marion,  Dr.  Walter 
Quentin  Tucker  of  Forest  Grove,  Washington  county,  comes  of  sound  English-Ameri- 
can stock.  The  son  of  this  Revolutionary  soldier  became  a  pioneer  of  Indiana  and  his 
son,  John  Wesley  Tucker  was  a  distinguished  lawyer  and  a  man  of  affairs.  He  served 
as  a  colonel  in  the  Civil  war,  was  United  States  district  attorney  for  the  southern 
district  of  Indiana  and  receiver  of  public  moneys  in  Nebraska.  He  married  Amanda 
Frances  Wilson,  a  member  of  a  pioneer  family  of  Tennessee  and  of  this  union  Walter 
Quentin  Tucker  was  born  at  Orleans.  Indiana,  in   1870. 

Dr.  Tucker  was  educated  in  the  grade  and  high  schools  of  Blair,  Nebraska,  and  in 
the  Normal  school  at  Fremont,  that  state.  He  pursued  his  medical  course  in  the 
College  of  Physicians  and  Surgeons  at  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  receiving  his  degree  of 
M.  D.  in  1895.  He  began  his  practice  at  Modesto,  Illinois,  and  remained  there  until 
1898  when  he  was  appointed  a  surgeon  in  the  Indian  service  for  the  next  ten  years. 
In  1908  he  came  to  Oregon  and  finding  the  people  and  the  climate  much  to  his  liking 
he  settled  at  Forest  Grove  and  has  since  practiced  his  profession  there  continuously. 

Dr.  Tucker  was  married  in  1S95  to  Miss  DoUie  McCurley,  a  daughter  of  James  and 
Talitha  McCurley,  both  of  Illinois  pioneer  stock.  They  have  three  children:  Ernestine 
Talitha,  a  graduate  of  the  local  high  school  who  is  training  to  be  a  nurse  with  the 
intention  of  assisting  her  father  in  his  office  practice;  Galen  Bartholow,  a  student  at 
the  Oregon  Agricultural  college;  and  Blanche  Helen,  a  high  school  student.  The  trio 
is  an  example  of  the  old  adage  that  "blood  will  tell."  Mrs.  Tucker  is  noted  as  a  model 
mother  and  hostess  and  is  a  member  of  the  Eastern  Star.  Dr.  Tucker  is  a  Mason,  a 
Modern  Woodman  and  a  member  of  the  Royal  Arcanum.  He  is  president  of  the  Wash- 
ington County  Medical  Association,  member  of  the  Oregon  Medical  Society  and  of  the 
American  Medical  Association.  He  has  many  friends  and  admirers  and  his  practice 
is   extensive. 


ESTES  SNEDECOR. 


Estes  Snedecor,  a  leading  member  of  the  Portland  bar,  to  whom  has  recently  come 
the  well  deserved  honor  of  election  as  president  of  the  International  Association  of 
Rotary  Clubs,  was  born  in  Tampa,  Florida,  December  21,  1887.  His  father,  the  Rev. 
James  G.  Snedecor,  a  Presbyterian  minister,  was  born  in  Yazoo  county,  Mississippi, 
in  1855,  and  married  Emily  Alston  Estes  in  Memphis,  Tennessee,  a  daughter  of  the 
late  Judge  Bedford  M.  Estes.  Thus  on  both  sides  he  comes  of  an  ancestry  distinguished 
for  strong  mentality  and  high  ideals.  His  father  died  in  November.  1916,  in  Atlanta, 
Georgia,  and  the  mother  now  makes  her  home  in  Tuscaloosa,  Alabama.  The  paternal 
grandfather  of  Mr.  Snedecor  was  an  officer  of  the  Mexican   war. 

It  was  in  the  public  schools  of  Tuscaloosa  that  Estes  Snedecor,  who  to  all  of  his 
friends  is  known  as  "Pete,"  pursued  his  early  education  and  in  190S  was  graduated 
from  the  University  of  Alabama  with  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree.  He  then  entered 
upon  the  study  of  law  and  a  two  years'  course  won  him  the  LL.  B.  degree  in  1910. 
He  pursued  a  special  law  course  at  the  University  of  Michigan  and  in  1910  came  to 
Portland,  where  he  has  since  engaged  in  practice,  making  a  specialty  of  the  law  regard- 
ing real  property  and  corporations.  He  is  broad-minded  and  clear-headed,  a  forceful 
speaker  and  a  convincing  advocate  and  one  who  in  the  practice  of  his  profession  has 
ever  held  to  the  highest  ethical  stqndards,  for  while  his  devotion  to  the  interests  of 
his  clients  has  become  proverbial,  he  always  recognizes  the  fact  that  he  owes  a  still 
higher  allegiance  to  the  majesty  of  the  law. 

On  the  29th  of  December,  1914,  in  Tuscaloosa,  Alabama,  Mr.  Snedecor  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Julia  Searcy,  who  was  a  daughter  of  the  late  Dr.  James  T.  Searcy  and  who 
passed   away   February   15,   1919,   leaving  a   little   daughter,  Katharin    Searcy   Snedecor. 


106  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

On  October  19,  1920,  at  Chicago,  Mr.  Snedecor  was  married  to  Rachel  King,  daughter 
of  Dr.  and  Mrs.  J.  C.  Elliott  King  of  Portland,  Oregon. 

The  religious  faith  of  Mr.  Snedecor  is  indicated  by  his  membership  iu  the  First 
Presbyterian  church.  He  takes  active  part  in  its  work  and  is  secretary  and  treasurer 
of  its  board  of  deacons.  He  belongs  to  the  University  Club,  the  Rotary  Club,  the  Pro- 
gressive Business  Men's  Club  and  the  Mazamas  Club.  The  last  named  is  an  organiza- 
tion of  mountain  climbers  and  Mr.  Snedecor  enjoys  the  distinction  of  being  the  only 
one-limbed  man  who  has  climbed  Mount  Hood.  He  votes  with  the  democratic  party 
and  during  the  World  war  assisted  materially  in  promoting  the  loan  drives,  was  a 
member  of  the  legal  advisory  board  and  was  one  of  the  Four-Minute  men.  As  a  citizen 
he  is  a  part  of  every  constructive  community  development  and  when  the  country 
faced  the  broader  and  graver  problems  that  brought  about  the  war  he  took  active  part 
in  all  patriotic  movements  and  was  a  leader  in  the  organizations  which  had  for  their 
purpose  the  winning  of  victory  and  the  improvement  of  the  condition  and  comfort 
of  the  men  in  camp  and  field.  His  forcefulness  as  a  speaker,  his  clear  reasoning  and 
his  cogent  presentation  of  every  subject  made  him  popular  as  one  of  the  Four-Minute 
speakers  and  in  this  field,  too,  his  influence  was  of  no  restricted  order.  He  has  long 
been  a  prominent  representative  on  the  coast  and  in  fact  throughout  the  country  of  the 
Rotary  Club  movement  and  during  the  war  was  the  American  representative  to  the 
Rotary  clubs  of  Great  Britain  and  was  in  1919  elected  international  vice  president.  His 
studies  of  the  principles  of  rotary  as  applied  to  the  commerce  of  the  world  were  pre- 
sented in  a  memorable  address  before  the  congress  of  rotary  governors  of  Chicago  in 
August,  1919.  When  he  was  elected  to  the  presidency  of  the  International  Associa- 
tion of  Rotary  Clubs  on  the  25th  of  June,  1920,  his  high  position  in  local  circles  was 
indicated  in  the  fact  that  Mayor  Baker  sent  to  him  the  following  telegram:  "Every 
citizen  of  Portland  is  delighted  to  learn  of  the  honor  due  and  paid  you  in  your  election 
as  president  of  the  International  Association  of  Rotary  Clubs.  It  is  a  big  job,  but  it 
has  found  a  big  man  from  a  big  city  that  will  back  him  up  in  every  way  necessary 
for  the  complete  success  of  his  administration."  It  is  characteristic  of  Mr.  Snedecor 
that  he  carries  forward  to  successful  completion  whatever  he  undertakes.  His  plans 
are  carefully  formulated  and  then  promptly  executed  and  he  is  ever  actuated  by  a  spirit 
of  progress  that  never  stops  short  of  the  successful  accomplishment  of  his  purpose. 


JOSEPH  F.  McNAUGHT. 


Joseph  F.  McNaught,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  engaged  in  alfalfa  farming,  mak- 
ing investments  and  lending  money  at  Hermiston,  Umatilla  county,  Oregon,  is  one  of 
the  public-spirited  men  of  that  place,  whose  labors  have  been  of  substantial  and  mate- 
rial value  to  the  community  in  the  line  of  general  progress.  He  is  a  native  of  the 
state  of  Illinois  and  was  born  near  the  village  of  Lexington,  ^McLean  county  in  1854. 
a  son  of  George  and  Nancy  (Franklin)  McNaught,  pioneers  and  prominent  residents 
of  that  community. 

After  acquiring  a  grade  and  high  school  education  in  his  own  town,  Joseph  F. 
McNaught  was  graduated  at  the  Illinois  Wesleyan  University  with  the  degree  of  B.  S. 
This  was  followed  with  a  law  course  at  Ann  Arbor,  Michigan.  At  the  age  of  twenty- 
two  he  was  united  in  marriage  to  Virginia  E.  Hodge,  daughter  of  Shelby  and  Mary 
C.  f Clark)  Hodge,  also  prominent  residents  of  McLean  county.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
McNaught  were  born  two  children:  Helen  Fairfax,  now  the  wife  of  Edward  H.  Geary 
of  Portland,  Oregon,  vice  president  and  manager  of  the  Security  Trust  Savings  Com- 
pany, and  Carl  Shelby,  who  is  a  resident  and  prominent  business  man  of  Hermiston, 
Oregon.  In  the  year  1877  Mr.  McNaught  took  his  young  bride  to  the  far  west,  locat- 
ing at  Seattle,  Washington  territory,  where  he  formed  a  law  partnership  with  his 
brother  James,  who  had  preceded  him  to  that  promising  little  city.  This  partnership 
continued  under  the  name  and  style  of  McNaught  Brothers  until  in  ISSl,  when  Ex- 
Governor  E.  P.  Ferry,  whose  term  as  governor  of  the  territory  of  Washington  had 
Just  expired,  was  taken  into  the  firm,  whose  name  and  style  was  changed  to  McNaught, 
Ferry  &  McNaught.  Later,  in  the  year  1884,  John  H.  Mitchell,  son  of  the  late  Senator 
Mitchell  of  Oregon,  was  given  a  place  in  the  firm,  which  then  became  McNaught,  Ferry, 
McNaught  &  Mitchell.  These  several  firms  enjoyed  the  largest  and  most  lucrative  law 
practice  of  any  firm  in  the  territory  and  state  of  Washington  up  to  the  time  when 
James  McNaught  was  made  chief  counsel  for  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad  Company, 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  107 

and  moved  to  New  York  city  in  1888.  At  the  same  time  Mr.  Ferry  accepted  a  position 
witli  the  Puget  Sound  National  Banlc,  from  which  position  he  was  elected  the  first 
governor  of  the  state  of  Washington,  and  Mr.  Mitchell  accepted  the  post  of  local  attor- 
ney for  the  Northern  Pacific,  located  at  Tacoma,  Washington.  At  this  juncture  Joseph 
F.  McNaught  organized  a  new  firm,  composed  of  Roger  S.  Greene,  ex-chief  justice  of 
the  territory  of  Washington;  C.  H.  Hanford,  later  made  judge  of  the  federal  court; 
John  H.  McGraw,  afterward  elected  governor  of  the  state  of  Washington,  and  him- 
self.    The  name  and  style  of  this  firm  was  Greene,  Hanford,  McNaught  &  McGraw. 

While  thus  engaged  in  the  practice  of  law  Mr.  McNaught  was  most  prominent  in 
the  upbuilding  of  the  aspiring  young  city  of  Seattle  and  was  always  found  in  the  fore- 
front in  all  efforts  to  advance  public  interests.  Through  his  great  activities  and  un- 
tiring energies  he  had,  prior  to  the  nation-wide  panic  of  1S93,  accumulated  much  wealth. 
He  was  regarded  as  a  successful  operator  and  most  reliable  in  all  of  his  dealings. 
One  of  his  outstanding  achievements  was  the  founding  and  fostering  of  the  city  of 
Anacortes,  on  the  Guaymas  Channel,  near  the  east  entrance  to  Puget  Sound,  where  he 
had  secured  five  thousand  acres  of  land  with  a  water  front  of  five  miles.  One  half  of 
this  he  gave  outright  to  the  Oregon  Improvement  Company,  to  secure  the  construc- 
tion of  twenty-five  miles  of  railroad  from  the  channel  up  the  Skagit  river,  and  to 
name  it  the  Spokane  &  Eastern  Railroad.  This  enterprise  proved  a  tremendous  suc- 
cess. Another  of  Mr.  McNaught's  marked  achievements  was  the  purchase  and  develop- 
ment of  a  large  area  of  prairie  lands  in  the  Palouse  section  of  eastern  Washington 
state,  for  the  growing  of  wheat.  These  lands  were  divided  into  farms  of  one  hundred 
and  sixty  acres  each.  A  house  and  barn  were  erected,  a  well  was  dug  on  each  farm, 
and  the  whole  properly  fenced.  This  was  pioneering  in  the  now  celebrated  Palouse 
country. 

During  the  winter  of  1S91-2,  while  he  and  Mrs.  McNaught  were  spending  a  few 
weeks  in  New  York  city.  Mr.  McNaught  suffered  a  temporary  loss  and  a  permanent 
impairment  of  his  sight.  For  more  than  four  years  he  was  unable  to  read.  This  mis- 
fortune cost  him  his  profession,  changed  his  whole  course  of  life  and  materially  slowed 
him  up.  This  serious  trouble,  aided  and  abetted  by  the  panic,  cut  deeply  into  his 
fortune  and  made  financial  recuperation  doubly  difficult.  In  the  early  spring  of  1S9S 
he  was  prevailed  upon  by  the  Boston  &  Alaska  Steamship  Company  to  supervise  the 
construction  of  some  half  dozen  river-boats  tor  the  Yukon,  at  Dutch  Harbor,  in  the 
Aleutian  Islands.  It  was  on  good  Friday  that  Mr.  McNaught  sailed  out  of  the  Seattle 
harbor  on  the  bark  Harry  Morse,  with  a  working  crew  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  men 
and  a  full  cargo  of  building  materials  (lumber,  hardware  and  machinery)  for  the 
construction  of  the  boats.  On  July  2nd,  following,  two  of  the  company's  ocean  steamers — 
the  Brixam  and  South  Portland — each  with  three  river-boats  in  tow,  headed  out  of  the 
harbor  for  the  open  Behring  Sea,  their  destination  being  St.  Michael  and  the  Yukon. 
The  writer  can  readily  believe  it  was  an  inspiring  sight. 

This  commission  having  been  accomplished,  Mr.  McNaught,  with  his  family,  spent 
a  year  on  the  shores  of  Lake  Slocan,  in  the  Selkirk  mountains,  recuperating.  After 
a  short  period  of  residence  in  the  city  of  Spokane,  he  turned  his  attention  to  the 
reclamation  of  arid  lands  and  centered  his  energies  in  the  district  in  which  he  now 
resides,  namely  the  Umatilla  River  Reclamation  Project.  In  1904  he  organized  the 
Maxwell  Land  &  Irrigation  Company  and  was  made  president  and  manager,  a  dual 
position  he  held  during  the  existence  of  the  company,  which  was  disorganized  after 
it  had  served  its  purpose.  This  company  purchased  some  ten  thousand  acres  of  the 
semi-arid  lands  lying  contiguous  to  the  Columbia  and  Umatilla  rivers,  and  filed  rights 
on  sufficient  water  of  the  Umatilla  to  irrigate  more  than  twenty  thousand  acres.  The 
town,  now  the  thriving  little  city  of  Hermiston,  was  founded  and  the  sale  and  develop- 
ment of  the  lands  and  water  rights  were  prosecuted  by  the  company  till  late  in  the 
year  1905,  when  all  the  water  rights  and  all  completed  irrigation  works  were  sold  to 
the  United  States  government.  The  project  was  thereafter  known  as  the  Umatilla 
River  Irrigation  Project.  Mr.  McNaught  continued  as  representative  of  the  company 
until  all  of  its  interests  were  sold  or  otherwise  disposed  of.  and  then  disorganized  the 
company.  He  is  now  actively  engaged  in  growing  alfalfa  hay;  is  the  owner  of  a  num- 
ber of  irrigated  farms  and  is  the  possessor  of  one  of  the  largest  and  best  equipped 
hay  farms  in  the  state.  Mr.  McNaught  has  taken  a  deep  interest  in  the  general  welfare 
of  the  irrigation  project;  has  been  repeatedly  elected  to  the  board  of  directors  of  both 
the  Water  Users  Association  and  the  Hermiston  Irrigation  District,  and  is  at  present 
president  of  each. 

Mr.  McNaught  always  votes  with  the  republican  party  and  in  all  matters  of  public 


108  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

moment  he  displays  a  spirit  of  marked  devotion  to  the  general  good.  He  holds  mem- 
bership with  the  Masons  and  the  Odd  Fellows.  Quick  to  grasp  the  possibility  o£  mak- 
ing the  arid  lands  of  Oregon  fertile  by  irrigation,  Mr.  McNaught  never  stopped  until 
his  plans  were  realized.  His  labors  are  proving  resultant  and  having  taken  the  initial 
step  in  utilizing  this  region  for  agricultural  purposes  has  added  greatly  to  the  value 
of  the  property  and  the  appearance  of  the  district.  Thus  he  ranks  among  the  valued 
and    progressive  business   men  of  the   county   and   state. 


EDWARD   R.   LESTER. 


Edward  R.  Lester,  manager  of  the  Pilot  Rock  Lumber  Company  of  Pilot  Rock, 
Umatilla  county,  was  born  in  Prairie  du  Chien.  Wisconsin,  on  the  26th  of  January, 
1862,  a  son  of  Samuel  and  Harriett  (Hale)  Lester,  the  former  a  native  of  Oswego,  New 
York,  and  the  latter  of  Rutland,  Vermont.  Samuel  Lester  went  to  Prairie  du  Chien, 
Wisconsin,  when  a  young  man  and  there  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business,  which 
he  conducted  with  gratifying  success  until  September,  1S67.  when  his  death  occurred 
at  the  age  of  forty-five  years.  He  was  a  republican,  a  Mason  and  a  member  of  the 
Congregational  church  and  both  he  and  his  wife  sang  in  the  choir  for  a  great  many 
years.     The  marriage  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lester  took  place  in  Wisconsin. 

Edward  R.  Lester  spent  his  boyhood  in  Wisconsin  and  there  received  his  educa- 
tion. He  later  worked  as  clerk  in  the  post  office  at  Prairie  du  Chien,  and  then  removing 
to  Minneapolis,  Minnesota,  accepted  a  like  position  in  the  post  office  there.  In  1883  he 
came  west  to  Portland,  where  he  remained  for  a  short  time  and  then  went  to  Glencoe, 
clerking  in  the  store  of  J.  J.  Fowler.  Mr.  Lester  returned  to  his  old  Wisconsin  home 
for  a  time  but  subsequently  went  west  again  and  worked  in  the  post  offices  at  Mitchell 
and  Aberdeen,  South  Dakota,  for  an  extended  period.  For  twenty-five  years  he  drove 
race  horses  for  various  owners  throughout  the  United  States  and  Canada  and  in  this 
connection  became  a  prominent  figure.  In  October,  1913,  he  went  to  Tacoma,  Wash- 
ington, and  soon  afterwards  removed  to  Pilot  Rock,  where  he  accepted  a  position  as 
manager  of  the  Pilot  Rock  Lumber  Company.  Under  his  able  management  this  busi- 
ness has  grown  to  extensive  proportions  and  his  keen  discrimination,  energy,  and  hon- 
orable methods  have  brought  him  to  the  fore  as  one  of  Pilot  Rock's  most  successful 
business  men. 

In  1909  Mr.  Lester  was-  married  to  Miss  Blanch  Chittenden,  a  aaughter  of  Charles 
A.  and  Ellen  (Barber)  Chittenden,  and  a  native  of  Grand  Rapids,  Michigan.  To  their 
union  two  children  have  been  born:  Mildred  and  Ruth. 

Since  age  conferred  upon  Mr.  Lester  the  right  of  franchise  he  has  been  a  stanch 
supporter  of  the  republican  party,  in  the  interests  of  which  he  has  taken  an  active 
part,  although  he  has  neither  desired  nor  sought  public  office.  His  fraternal  connec- 
tion is  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  as  an  active  worker  in  the 
civic  affairs  of  the  community  he  holds  membership  in  the  Pilot  Rock  Commercial  Club. 


ROSCOE  RUSH   GILTNER. 

Roscoe  Rush  Giltner,  who  about  the  close  of  the  nineteenth  century  was  reputed 
to  be  the  most  able  trial  lawyer  in  Portland  and  who  maintained  his  position  of  lead- 
ership at  the  bar  of  the  city  to  the  time  of  his  demise,  was  born  in  Northumberland 
county,  Pennsylvania,  October  25,  1857,  his  parents  being  Dr.  Jacob  S.  and  Martha  M. 
(Hause)  Giltner.  The  father  was  born  in  Northumberland  county.  Pennsylvania. 
October  22,  1824,  and  passed  away  in  Portland,  May  IS,  1910.  His  parents  were  Conrad 
and  Rebecca  (Snyder)  Giltner  and  his  ancestral  line  was  traced  directly  back  to  the 
Prince  of  Orange.  Conrad  Giltner  was  a  soldier  of  the  Revolutionary  war  and  he 
became  a  prominent  and  highly  respected  farmer  of  Pennsylvania  where  he  owned  a 
large  tract  of  land.  His  son.  Dr.  Giltner,  had  but  limited  educational  opportunities 
but  his  desire  for  knowledge  is  shown  in  the  fact  that  when  plowing  in  the  fields  he 
often  had  his  book  with  him  and  his  evenings  were  devoted  to  study.  His  mother, 
sympathizing  with  his  ambition  to  secure  an  education,  sent  him  to  college  upon 
inheriting  a  little  money  and  thus  gave  to  him  the  wished  for  opportunity  that  con- 
stituted a  step  toward  his  later  success.     He  was  graduated   from  the  medical   depart- 


EDWARD    R.    LESTER 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  111 

ment  of  the  University  of  Pennsylvania  when  twenty-one  years  of  age  and  in  1S46 
he  wedded  Miss  Martha  M.  Hause,  of  Germantown,  Pennsylvania.  They  began  their 
domestic  life  near  Harrisburg.  that  state,  and  afterward  returned  to  his  home  county, 
where  he  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  until  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war. 
He  then  took  a  competitive  examination  and  thereby  won  the  appointment  of  comman- 
der and  medical  director  of  the  hospital  of  the  Army  of  the  Cumberland  at  Nashville, 
Tennessee,  with  the  rank  of  major.  He  enlisted  at  Milton,  Pennsylvania,  and  was 
mustered  in  at  Washington,  D.  C,  doing  splendid  service  for  the  cause,  both  in  field 
and  hospital  work.  The  valuable  experience  which  he  gained  during  his  military 
career  made  him  later  a  specialist  in  the  field  of  surgery  in  his  private  practice. 
When  the  war  was  over  he  went  to  Pithole,  Pennsylvania,  and  in  June,  1S66,  started 
for  Oregon,  remaining  a  prominent  member  of  the  medical  profession  in  Portland  until 
about  seventy-eight  years  of  age.  About  1875  he  returned  to  Pennsylvania  for  post- 
graduate work.  For  several  years  he  was  county  physician  of  Multnomah  county,  was 
also  city  physician  and  visiting  physician  to  the  insane  asylum  before  his  removal  to 
Salem.  His  contributions  to  the  literature  of  the  profession  were  many  and  valuable. 
It  was  on  the  9th  of  March,  1S46,  that  he  wedded  Martha  M.  Hause,  a  daughter  of 
Abraham  and  Mary  Hause,  of  Philadelphia.  Mrs.  Giltner  was  born  in  Chester  county, 
Pennsylvania,  December  25,  1S26,  and  by  her  marriage  became  the  mother  of  ten  chil- 
dren, four  of  whom  died  in  infancy. 

Politically  Dr.  Giltner  was  a  stanch  republican  and  while  never  an  office  seeker 
he  was  appointed  a  member  of  the  school  board  about  1872  and  served  for  several 
years,  being  instrumental  in  the  establishment  of  the  Portland  high  school  and  instru- 
mental in  securing  the  passage  of  a  bill  allowing  colored  children  to  attend  the  public 
schools.  In  early  life  he  became  a  Mason  and  while  reared  in  the  Society  of  Friends, 
to  which  belief  he  always  adhered,  he  afterward  became  a  member  of  St.  James'  Luth- 
eran church  in  Portland.  He  died  May  18,  1910,  while  his  wife  passed  away  March 
2,  1905.  He  was  a  man  of  scholarly  attainments,  of  most  kindly  nature  and  generous 
spirit,  giving  a  tenth  of  his  income  to  the  support  of  the  Gospel  for  the  benefit  of 
local  hospitals  and  the  poorer  classes.  His  life  was  largely  blameless  and  it  is  said 
that  there  was  no  one  who  could  be  found  in  Portland  to  say  aught  against  him. 

His  son,  Roscoe  Rush  Giltner,  obtained  his  early  education  in  the  schools  of 
Portland,  for  he  was  a  lad  of  only  about  nine  years  when  the  family  home  was  estab- 
lished in  this  city.  He  was  prepared  for  Yale  by  Professor  Johnson,  completing  his 
course  within  the  classic  walls  of  the  old  New  Haven  institution  in  1881.  He  had  also 
pursued  a  preparatory  course  in  the  Hopkins  grammar  school  in  New  Haven  before 
entering  Yale.  He  prepared  for  the  bar  as  a  law  student  with  Richard  Williams  and 
the  late  Governor  W.  W.  Thayer  and  was  admitted  to  practice  in  the  courts  of  Oregon 
in  1884.  Ten  years  afterward,  or  in  1894,  he  was  elected  city  attorney  and  was  the 
first  incumbent  in  that  position  to  occupy  the  offices  in  the  new  City  Hall  building. 
During  that  year  he  formed  a  partnership  with  Russell  E.  Sewald,  an  association  that 
was  continued  until  his  death.  Mr.  Giltner  was  the  chief  deputy  prosecuting  attorney 
from  1898  until  1900.  during  which  time  he  conducted  some  of  the  most  important 
criminal  trials  in  the  history  of  the  county.  He  convicted  the  famous  outlaw,  Harry 
Tracy,  and  caused  him  to  be  sent  to  the  Oregon  penitentiary.  He  also  handled  the 
famous  McDaniel  murder  case  and  was  the  prosecutor  in  various  other  cases  of  note, 
in  all  of  which  he  displayed  marked  ability  in  handling  the  evidence  and  in  presenting 
the  points  in  law  to  the  court.  In  connection  with  his  partner,  Mr.  Giltner  equipped 
and  operated  a  logging  road  for  five  years,  the  line  extending  to  a  large  timber  tract 
which  he  owned.  The  road  was  sold  for  three  hundred  and  twelve  thousand  dollars. 
The  land,  thirty-one  miles  from  Portland,  is  still  owned  by  the  family  and  yet  has  upon 
it  a  large  body  of  timber.  Mrs.  Giltner  is  likewise  the  owner  of  all  of  Manhattan  beach, 
a  section  of  the  Tillamook  beach.  The  lumber  tract  comprises  three  thousand  acres  of 
land  and  the  family  is  also  interested  in  farm  lands. 

In  1892  Mr.  Giltner  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Fronia  Wallace,  of  Cottage 
Grove,  Oregon,  a  daughter  of  John  Calvin  and  Harriet  (Veach)  Wallace,  the  former 
a  native  of  Kentucky,  while  the  latter  was  born  in  Iowa.  Her  parents  came  to  Oregon 
in  1865,  settling  at  Cottage  Grove  where  the  father  was  engaged  in  the  brick  and  stone 
contract  business.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Giltner  had  no  children  of  their  own,  but  the  kindness 
of  their  hearts  prompted  them  to  rear  and  educate  six  children,  all  receiving  college 
training. 

Mr.   Giltner   was   particularly   liberal   in  helping  young   boys   through   college   and 


112  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

in  other  ways  preparing  them  for  life's  practical  and  responsible  duties.  He  was  promi- 
nent in  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks,  also  in  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and 
was  a  life  member  of  the  Multnomah  Amateur  Athletic  Club.  He  passed  away  Decem- 
ber 14,  1918,  being  then  sixty-one  years  of  age.  He  was  not  only  a  representative  of 
one  of  the  prominent  pioneer  families,  but  his  personal  worth  had  given  him  high 
position  in  professional  and  social  circles.  Throughout  his  entire  career  he  was 
never  content  to  choose  the  second  best.  His  ideals  of  life  were  high  and  he  at  all 
times  attempted  to  live  up  to  them.  He  recognized  his  duties  and  his  opportunities 
in  relation  to  the  public  just  as  fully  as  he  recognized  his  professional  opportunities 
and  he  utilized  the  former  as  earnestly  and  effectively  as  the  latter.  Of  him  it  might 
well  be  said,  when  one  considers  the  good  that  he  accomplished  in  assisting  the  young 
to  prepare  for  life: 

"His   life  was   noble   and   the   elements   so   mixed   in   him 
That  nature  might  stand  up  and   say  to  all  the  world 
This  was  a   man." 


ARTHUR  MARTIN  SILVA,  D.  D. 

Dr.  Arthur  Martin  Silva  who  practices  his  profession  in  Clatskanie.  is  one  of  the 
most  successful  and  prominent  of  the  professional  men  in  that  place.  He  is  a  native 
of  Columbia  county,  born  at  Rainier,  in  1892,  the  son  of  Joseph  and  Katherine  (Wilson) 
Silva.  His  grandfather  was  a  member  of  the  diplomatic  corps  in  Portugal  and  a  man 
of  large  affairs.  Joseph  Silva  came  to  America  when  but  thirteen  years  of  age,  with 
the  determination  to  build  his  own  future.  For  a  short  time  he  remained  in  Boston, 
Massachusetts,  and  then  sought  the  Pacific  coast,  settling  at  Rainier  in  the  early 
pioneer  days.  The  Doctor's  mother  was  also  of  a  pioneer  family,  whose  forbears  had 
lived  tor  many  generations  in  the  Southern  States.  Joseph  Silva  went  to  work  at  the 
lumber  business  at  Rainier,  and  built  and  operated  for  many  years  one  of  the  largest 
sawmills  in  that  section.  He  also  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business  and  at  the  time 
of  his  demise  a  few  years  ago  he  left  a  very  large  estate,  mostly  in  valuable  land 
holdings  that  are  increasing  in  value  year  by  year. 

Dr.  Silva  was  educated  in  the  grade  and  high  schools  of  Rainier,  and  after  taking 
up  other  avocations,  decided  to  take  up  dentistry  as  his  life  work.  He  matriculated 
at  the  North  Pacific  Dental  College  of  Portland  and  was  graduated  therefrom  upon 
the  completion  of  his  course  in  1919,  with  the  degree  of  D.  M.  D.  He  then  entered  the 
office  of  Dr.  F.  R.  Davis,  the  leading  dentist  of  Portland.  After  a  short  term  of  service 
here  he  moved  to  Clatskanie,  where  he  established  an  office  and  soon  built  up  a  fine 
practice. 

In  1917  Dr.  Silva  served  in  the  navy  at  Bremerton  navy  yard,  but  was  sent  back 
to  finish  his  professional  course,  and  the  signing  of  the  armistice  prevented  his  recall. 
Fraternally  Dr.  Silva  is  a  member  of  the  Odd  Fellows,  the  Moose  and  the  Red  Men. 
He  has  not  yet  married  but  it  will  not  be  surprising  if  this  popular  young  man  should 
enter  the  ranks  of  the  Benedicts  before  the  publication  of  this  brief  story.  His 
acknowledged  ability,  wide  acquaintance  and  family  connections  assure  him  success 
in  his  profession. 


SAMUEL   ELLIS   WISHARD. 

The  name  of  Samuel  Ellis  Wishard  figures  on  the  pages  of  pioneer  history  in 
Oregon,  for  he  became  a  resident  of  the  state  in  1852  and  was  for  many  years  one  of  its 
substantial  citizens,  passing  away  in  Portland  at  the  age  of  seventy-eight.  Mr.  Wishard 
was  a  great-grandson  of  William  Wishard.  a  native  of  Scotland,  who  was  born  between 
the  years  1720  and  1725.  He  was  a  man  of  excellent  constitution  and  of  good  habits, 
who  enjoyed  educational  opportunities  that  gave  him  considerable  standing  in  the 
community.  By  trade  he  was  a  weaver.  He  was  driven  from  his  home  by  religious 
persecution  and  took  refuge  in  County  Tyrven  in  the  north  of  Ireland,  a  Protestant 
section  of  the  Emerald  isle.  There  he  obtained  a  position  as  coachman  with  Lord 
Lytle,   who   had   married   Lady   Jane   Stuart.     The   following   account   of   the   romantic 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  113 

marriage  of  William  Wishard  to  Susanah  Lytle  was  written  by  their  great-grandson. 
Samuel  E.  Wishard:  "Wishard,  now  acting  as  coachman,  became  interested  in  Susanah 
Lytle.  His  aitection  was  reciprocated  by  the  young  lady,  who  finally  left  her  home 
and  was  clandestinely  married  to  Wishard,  in  opposition  to  the  wishes  of  her  parents. 
Miss  Lytle's  brothers  pursued  them  with  the  purpose  of  taking  the  life  of  Wishard 
and  recovering  their  sister.  Wishard  made  his  escape,  but  the  sister  was  secured  and 
brought  back  to  her  home,  while  it  was  supposed  that  her  husband  had  taken  a  vessel 
for  America.  Mrs.  Wishard  was  kept  in  close  confinement,  lest  she  should  again  escape 
and  follow  her  husband.  During  this  period  her  first  child  was  born,  and  named  Wil- 
liam, after  the  name  of  the  child's  father.  After  the  expiration  of  two  years  the  Lytle 
family  heard  that  the  vessel  on  which  Wishard  had  sailed  had  been  wrecked.  It  hap- 
pened, however,  that  he  had  taken  another  vessel  and  about  the  time  that  they  heard 
of  his  destruction  he  returned  in  disguise.  He  came  to  the  old  Lytle  estate,  where  he 
was  recognized  and  befriended  by  one  of  the  tenant  families.  Susanah's  health  becom- 
ing somewhat  impaired  by  close  confinement,  her  family  was  obliged  to  allow  her  some 
liberty  in  the  open  air.  On  one  of  these  occasions  while  walking  out  for  her  health, 
Wishard  secretly  secured  an  interview  with  her  after  their  long  separation.  A  second 
arrangement  was  made  for  their  escape.  Interviews  were  frequently  secured  and  the 
matter  was  kept  secret  until  a  vessel  was  found  coming  directly  to  America.  When 
the  time  arrived  for  the  departure  of  the  vessel,  Mrs.  Wishard  went  out  with  her 
child  for  her  usual  walk  and  never  returned  to  her  father's  house,  for  Wishard  took 
her.  With  her  husband  she  came  directly  to  America,  a  short  time  before  the  Revolu- 
tionary war,  probably  about  1773.  They  landed  at  Philadelphia  and  settled  near  the 
city,  on  what  was  then  called  'The  waters  of  Brandywine.'  " 

While  there  residing,  the  son  Samuel  was  born,  December  18,  1775,  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  William  Wishard  and  it  was  exactly  a  half  century  later  that  the  birth  of  Samuel 
E.  Wishard  occurred.  It  was  also  at  the  Brandywine  home  that  the  first  daughter, 
Annis,  was  born  in  the  September  which  preceded  the  battle  of  Brandywine,  one  of  the 
momentous  engagements  of  the  Revolutionary  war.  In  the  meantime  the  father,  Wil- 
liam Wishard,  had  enlisted  in  the  American  army  and  was  made  a  sergeant,  serving 
throughout  the  period  of  hostilities  and  receiving  his  discharge  at  the  close  of  the  war. 
The  birth  of  his  fourth  child,  Jane,  occurred  June  25,  1777,  and  it  was  subsequent  to 
this  time  that  the  family  removed  to  Redstone  Fort.  As  the  years  passed  eight  other 
children  were  added  to  the  family  while  they  were  still  residents  of  Pennsylvania. 
In  the  autumn  of  1794  William  Wishard  started  by  boat  down  the  Brandywine  river, 
thence  down  the  Ohio  to  the  mouth  of  the  Licking  river,  after  which  he  proceeded  up 
the  latter  stream  to  the  point  where  Fleming  creek  empties  into  the  Licking.  There  he 
settled  in  what  is  now  known  as  Nicholas  county,  Kentucky,  and  there  another  child, 
James,  was  born.  It  was  in  that  county  that  the  mother,  Mrs.  Susanah  (Lytle) 
Wishard,  passed  away.  About  1798  William  Wishard  married  again,  his  second  wife 
being  a  widow,  Mrs.  Bets.v  Rhoades,  and  by  this  marriage  there  were  two  sons,  Andrew 
and  Robert,  making  the  family  fifteen  children   in  all. 

Of  the  eight  children  born  at  Redstone  Fort,  John  Wishard  was  the  seventh  in 
rrr'er  of  bM-»h  He  was  horn  Jure  3.  1792.  He  and  three  of  his  brothers — Abram. 
Samuel  and  James — removed  to  Indiana  between  1825  and  1830,  John  Wishard  becoming 
a  resident  of  Johnson  county,  ten  miles  south  of  Indianapolis.  He  married  and  had 
eleven  children,  eight  sons  and  three  daughters.  Two  of  the  sons  died  in  infancy  and 
six  of  the  number  reached  adult  age.  Of  these  Andrew  died  at  the  age  of  twenty-one 
and  James  when  twenty-seven  years  of  age.  A  sister,  Jane,  died  at  the  age  of  eighteen. 
Others  of  the  family  lived  to  advanced  years,  some  passing  beyond  the  seventieth  mile- 
stone on  life's  journey,  others  reaching  more  than  their  eightieth  year,  while  still 
another.   Dr.   William   Wishard.   was   ninety-three   when   he   passed   away. 

It  seems  that  the  call  of  the  west  was  always  felt  by  the  Wishard  family.  It 
brought  the  great-grandparents  of  Samuel  E.  Wishard  to  the  new  world  and  took 
them  from  Pennsylvania  into  Kentucky.  It  took  the  second  generation  into  Indiana 
and  the  third  and  fourth  generations  were  well  represented  in  Oregon. 

It  was  in  the  year  1852  that  Archie  Wishard  left  Indiana  with  his  family  and 
crossed  the  plains  after  the  primitive  manner  of  travel  at  that  time.  He  settled  near 
Lebanon,  where  he  secured  a  donation  land  claim.  Samuel  E.  Wishard  came  with  his 
parents  to  Oregon  when  sixteen  years  of  age  and  assisted  in  the  development  of  his 
father's  donation  claim.  He  subsequently  removed  to  Portland,  where  for  more 
than  forty-five  years  he  made  his  home. 


114  HI8T0RY  OF  OREGON 

Samuel  Ellis  Wishard  was  united  in  marriage  in  1870  to  Miss  Sarah  Frances 
Powell,  a  daughter  of  Dr.  John  Parker  and  Adaline  (Duvall)  Powell,  who  crossed  the 
plains  with  their  family — father,  mother  and  three  children.  The  children  were: 
Herman  Ledyard,  who  died  in  Portland  at  about  sixty  years  of  age;  Sarah  Frances; 
and  Nancy  Jane,  now  the  widow  of  the  Rev.  Thomas  L.  Sails,  who  was  a  minister  of 
the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  in  Oregon  for  fifteen  years  and  who  died  at  McMinn- 
ville,  this  state.  Mrs.  Sarah  Frances  (Powell)  Wishard  survives  her  husband  and  is 
yet  a  resident  of  Portland,  where  she  has  many  friends.  In  1869  Mr.  Wishard  was 
initiated  into  Washington  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  being  the  first  member  received  into 
that  lodge.  He  also  became  a  meuiber  of  the  Scottish  Rite  bodies  and  attained  the 
thirty-second  degree  in  the  consistory  in  Portland.  He  was  ever  an  exemplary  repre- 
sentative of  the  craft,  loyal  to  its  teachings,  and  the  sterling  worth  of  his  character 
was  recognized  by  his  brethren  of  the  fraternity  and  by  all  with  whom  he  came  into 
contact. 


SIMON    L.    KLINE. 


Simon  L.  Kline  became  one  of  the  prominent  and  representative  residents  of 
Oregon.  Brought  to  this  state  in  his  childhood,  he  engaged  for  many  years  in  the 
tailoring  business  and  he  also  became  a  leader  in  the  political  circles  of  the  state, 
standing  at  all  times  for  that  which  was  best  in  citizenship  and  that  which  was  pro- 
gressive in  business.  Mr.  Kline  was  born  in  Cincinnati,  Ohio,  in  1856,  a  son  of  Louis 
G.  Kline,  who  removed  from  Cincinnati  to  Oregon  in  1864,  making  the  trip  by  the 
water  route  and  the  Isthmus  of  Panama.  On  reaching  Portland  he  proceeded  by 
boat  to  Oregon  City  and  thence  by  wagon  to  Corvallis.  He  was  a  tailor  by  trade  and 
opened  a  small  tailoring  shop  and  mercantile  establishment,  thus  laying  the  foundation 
for  the  present  substantial  business  now  conducted  by  his  grandson,  Walter  H.  Kline. 
Louis  G.  Kline  continued  active  in  the  management  of  his  interests  until  1886,  when 
he  was  succeeded  by  his  son,  Simon  L.  Kline. 

In  the  meantime  to  the  son  had  come  the  experiences  of  the  growing  boy  who 
largely  devotes  his  attention  to  the  acquirement  of  an  education.  He  thoroughly  learned 
the  tailoring  trade  under  his  father's  direction,  becoming  more  and  more  familiar  with 
the  business,  and  in  1886  he  assumed  the  management  of  the  enterprise  which  his  father 
had  established  twenty-two  years  before.  For  twenty-three  years  Simon  L.  Kline  was 
actively  and  prominently  associated  with  the  mercantile  interests  of  Corvallis  through 
the  conduct  of  this  business,  building  up  his  trade  by  progressive  and  thoroughly 
reliable  methods,  having  the  patronage  of  many  of  the  best  citizens  of  Corvallis. 

In  early  manhood  Simon  L.  Kline  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Emma  T.  Tobias, 
a  native  of  New  York  city.  Their  son,  Walter  H.  Kline,  is  mentioned  elsewhere  in  this 
work.  They  gained  many  friends  during  the  long  years  of  their  residence  in  Corvallis, 
Simon  L.  Kline  having  for  forty-five  years  made  his  home  in  this  city  when  he  was 
called  to  his  final  rest.  Not  only  did  he  figure  prominently  in  commercial  circles  but 
was  also  a  recognized  leader  in  politics  in  the  state.  He  was  mentioned  as  a  candidate 
for  the  oflace  of  governor  of  Oregon  and  he  served  as  delegate-at-large  to  the  national 
convention  which  nominated  Theodore  Roosevelt  for  president  of  the  United  States.  He 
was  also  one  of  forty  who  were  selected  to  act  as  aides  at  the  inaugural  ball  held  in 
honor  of  President  William  H.  Taft.  He  served  as  a  member  of  the  city  council  and 
as  a  member  ,of  the  board  of  water  commissioners,  in  which  connection  he  was  in- 
strumental in  securing  for  Corvallis  a  water  supply  from  Marys  Peak,  a  distance  of 
fourteen  miles  from  the  city.  When  the  plant  was  first  installed,  service  was  given  to 
five  hundred  people  and  today  the  water  system  serves  the  Oregon  Agricultural  College 
with  its  four  thousand  students,  the  cities  of  Corvallis  and  Philomath  and  also  the 
farmers  along  the  pipe  line,  a  family  of  ordinary  size  paying  a  water  rate  of  seventy- 
five  cents  per  month.  Mr.  Kline  contributed  in  substantial  measure  to  the  development 
and  upbuilding  of  Corvallis,  with  Whose  history  his  name  is  inseparably  interwoven, 
and  through  his  political  activity  he  left  his  impress  in  marked  measure  upon  the 
history  of  the  state. 

Mr.  Kline  was  also  very  prominent  in  Masonic  circles  and  labored  untiringly  for 
the  interest  of  the  craft.  He  belonged  to  Corvallis  Lodge,  No.  14,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.; 
Ferguson  Chapter,  No.  5,  R.  A.  M.,  of  Corvallis;   Oregon  Council,  R.  &  S.  M.;    and   to 


I 


SIMON   L.   KLINE 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  117 

Oregon  Consistory,  No.  1,  A.  A.  S.  R.,  having  attained  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the 
Scottish  Rite.  He  was  likewise  a  member  of  Al  Kader  Temple,  A.  A.  0.  N.  M.  S.,  of 
Portland,  Oregon,  and  he  belonged  to  the  Eastern  Star.  At  all  times  he  exemplified  in 
his  life  the  beneficent  spirit  of  Masonry,  which  is  based  upon  a  recognition  of  the 
brotherhood  of  man  and  the  obligations  thereby  imposed.  Mr.  Kline  at  all  times  held 
to  the  highest  ideals  in  citizenship,  was  actuated  by  a  progressive  spirit  in  business 
and  in  every  relation  of  life  exemplified  the  highest  standards  of  manhood  and  citizen- 
ship. He  passed  away  in  September,  1909,  after  a  short  illness,  his  wife  surviving  him 
until  January,  1917,  the  remains  of  both  being  interred  in  San  Francisco.  In  their  pass- 
ing Corvallis  lost  two  of  the  representative  pioneer  residents  of  Oregon,  but  their  memory 
will  long  be  enshrined  in  the  hearts  of  those  who  knew  the.ii. 


I 


HON.  CHARLES  B.  MOORES. 

The  name  of  Hon.  Charles  B.  Moores  is  closely  associated  with  the  history  of  Oregon 
along  many  lines  of  development  and  progress.  He  now  makes  his  home  in  Portland 
and  his  record  is  such  that  the  city  may  well  be  proud  to  number  him  among  her 
residents.  He  was  born  in  Benton,  Missouri,  August  6,  1S49,  and  is  a  son  of  the 
Hon.  John  H.  and  Virginia  L.  (Lamon)  Moores.  The  paternal  grandfather  was  Colonel 
I.  R.  Moores,  Sr.,  who  commanded  a  regiment  in  the  Black  Hawk  war  in  Illinois  and 
who  also  served  in  the  Mexican  war.  In  1852  he  came  to  Oregon,  settling  near  Eugene, 
and  his  ability  and  public  spirit  soon  won  him  recognition  in  election  to  the  terri- 
torial legislature  from  Lane  county.  He  also  served  as  a  member  of  the  Oregon  state 
constitutional  convention  of  1S57  and  was  the  candidate  of  the  republican  party  for 
the  state  senate.  He  was  very  prominent  in  the  ranks  of  his  party  and  enjoyed  the 
high  esteem  of  his  fellow  citizens  regardless  of  political  opinion.  One  of  his  sons. 
Colonel  I.  R,  Moores,  Jr.,  for  several  years  represented  Marion  county  in  the  house  of 
representatives  and  was  chosen  speaker  in  1S65.  Thus  the  family  have  left  their 
impress  upon  the  legislative  records  of  the  state  and  in  many  other  ways  have  aided 
in  shaping  the  history  of  the  commonwealth.  Hon.  John  H.  Moores,  father  of  Charles 
B.  Moores,  was  equally  prominent  in  public  affairs  and  for  several  years  represented 
Marion  county  in  the  state   senate. 

Charles  B.  Moores  was  accorded  liberal  educational  advantages  and  in  1870  was 
graduated  from  Willamette  University  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  He  soon 
afterward  became  draughtsman  for  the  Oregon  &  California  Railroad  Company  and 
was  associated  with  the  land  office  of  that  company  for  a  period  of  four  years.  In  1874 
he  went  to  the  east,  where  he  pursued  a  course  of  study  in  a  business  college  and  also 
.spent  a  short  time  in  the  law  department  of  the  University  of  Pennsylvania.  Subse- 
quently he  resumed  his  law  studies  in  the  University  of  Michigan  at  Ann  Arbor  and 
was  there  graduated  with  the  class  of  1877.  He  won  class  honors  and  also  the  degree 
of  LL.  B. 

Upon  his  return  to  Oregon  Mr.  Moores  was  admitted  to  the  bar  at  Salem  and  entered 
upon  the  practice  of  his  profession.  He  also  came  into  prominence  in  public  connections 
and  in  1880  acted  as  chief  clerk  of  the  house  of  representatives.  From  1882  until  1887 
he  held  the  position  of  private  secretary  to  Governor  Moody  and  in  1894  was  elected  to 
represent  Marion  county  in  the  general  assembly,  being  chosen  to  this  oflSce  by  a  large 
majority,  and  in  the  following  session  he  was  elected  speaker  of  the  house.  His  rulings 
were  strictly  fair  and  impartial  and  commanded  for  him  the  respect  of  his  political 
opponents  as  well  as  his  political  colleagues.  Mr.  Moores  was  also  a  member  of  the 
city  council  of  Salem  for  several  years  and  whether  in  local  or  state  office  was  most 
loyal  to  the  duties  that  devolved  upon  him  and  held  to  high  standards  in  the  perform- 
ance of  every  task  that  tell  to  his  lot.  He  was  likewise  identified  with  the  educational 
interests  of  the  state  in  an  active  manner,  serving  from  1878  until  the  present  as  a 
member  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  Willamette  University.  In  former  years  he  had  acted 
as  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  institution.  The  position  of  trustee  of  the  university 
was  also  at  one  time  filled  by  his  father. 

Both  Mr.  Moores  of  this  review  and  his  father  were  identified  with  lumber  manu- 
facturing interests  at  Salem,  where  Hon.  John  H.  Moores  was  also  for  a  number  of  years 
a  dry  goods  merchant.  Both  left  their  impress  for  good  upon  the  material,  intellectual, 
social,  political  and  moral  progress  of  the  community.     Both  were  leading  workers   in 


118  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  Charles  B.  Moores  affiliated  with  the  or- 
ganization at  Portland,  becoming  a  member  of  Chemekela  Lodge  No.  1,  of  which  he 
was  at  one  time  noble  grand. 

On  the  1st  of  November,  1881,  Mr.  Moores  was  married  to  Miss  Sallie  E.  Chamber- 
lin  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  four  children:  Gertrude  E.,  Merrill  B.,  Gor- 
don C.  and  Chester  Alexander.  The  eldest  is  the  wife  of  Albert  S.  Wells,  state  chemist 
of  Portland.  Merrill  B.  is  a  graduate  of  the  Oregon  Agricultural  College  and  also  of 
Cornell  University.  Gordon  C.  was  graduated  from  the  University  of  Oregon  and  resides 
at  Kennewick,  Washington.  He  has  twice  represented  his  district  in  the  house  of  rep- 
resentatives. Chester  A.  was  connected  with  the  Oregonian  of  Portland  for  several 
years  and  was  private  secretary  to  Governor  Withycombe  until  the  latter's  death  and 
afterward  to  Governor  Olcott,  while  at  the  present  time  he  is  associated  with  the  F.  E. 
Taylor  Company.  The  son,  Merrill  B.,  was  a  first  lieutenant  of  the  aviation  branch  of 
the  United  States  army  and  saw  active  service  in  France.  Mrs.  Moores  is  a  native 
of  Michigan  and  was  graduated  from  the  Willamette  University  at  Salem,  receiving 
the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Science.  She  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church 
and  has  been  active  and  earnest  in  promoting  the  moral  development  of  the  community. 
In  politics  Mr.  Moores  has  always  been  an  earnest  republican  and  was  chairman  of  the 
republican  state  central  committee  in  1912  and  1914.  He  was  the  president  of  the 
Oregon  State  Pioneer  Association  in  1915.  For  ten  years  he  has  served  as  a  member 
of  the  Portland  municipal  dock  commission,  being  called  to  the  office  upon  the  crea- 
tion of  the  commission,  and  for  the  past  five  years  has  been  its  chairman.  For  the 
past  three  years  he  has  been  vice  president  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the  State 
Historical  Society.  There  is  no  project  nor  enterprise  which  has  to  do  with  the  progress 
and  upbuilding  of  Oregon  that  does  not  elicit  the  attention  and  receive  the  support  of 
Mr.  Moores  when  it  is  possible  for  him  to  give  active  aid  thereto.  He  belongs  to  a 
family  that  has  made  valuable  contribution  to  the  state.  Several  representatives  of  the 
name  have  aided  in  shaping  the  legislation  of  Oregon  and  at  all  times  they  have  stood 
for  progress  and  improvement,  for  justice,  truth  and  right.  Charles  B.  Moores  is  today 
one  of  the  honored  residents  of  the  commonwealth  and  although  he  has  passed  the 
Psalmist's  allotted  span  of  three  score  years  and  ten,  he  is  yet  an  active  factor  in  the 
world's  work  and  one  whose  efforts  have  been  a  tangible  and  potent  element  for  good 
in  connection  with  the  development  of  the  state,  with  the  utilization  of  its  natural 
resources  and  with  the  establishment  of  those  interests  which  make  for  a  higher  degree 
of  citizenship  and  for  loftier  standards  of  civic  virtue  and  civic  pride. 


NICOLAI  NEIMAN  BLUMENSAADT. 

Nicolai  N.  Blumensaadt,  prominent  citizen  of  Rainier  and  manager  of  the  New 
York  and  Rainier  Company,  a  mineral  soap  making  corporation,  was  born  in  Denmark 
in  1879.  His  father  and  grandfather,  each  of  whom  bore  the  name  Nicolai  Neiman. 
were  both  graduate  chemists.  His  grandfather  was  graduated  from  the  Berlin  Col- 
lege of  Technology,  and  in  1835  established  a  chemical  soap  manufacturing  plant,  which 
he  conducted  until  his  death.  This  business  was  inherited  by  his  son,  who  was  a 
graduate  in  chemistry  from  one  of  the  most  noted   universities  of  Paris. 

Nicolai  Neiman  Blumensaadt,  the  third,  was  educated  in  Odense,  Denmark,  his 
birthplace,  and  graduated  in  chemistry  at  Copenhagen.  After  receiving  his  diploma 
he  became  superintendent  of  his  father's  plant,  but  his  work  was  interrupted  by  his 
enforced  service  in  the  Danish  army.  He  thereupon  determined  to  settle  in  the  United 
States  and  landed  in  Philadelphia  in  1904,  at  once  securing  work  in  a  soap  manu- 
facturing plant.  There  he  remained  for  a  year  when  he  was  offered  the  position  of 
manager  of  the  Preston  Manufacturing  Company,  makers  of  Rainier  mineral  soap.  He 
continued  in  this  position  until  the  plant  was  sold  to  eastern  capitalists  and  re-incor- 
porated as  the  New  York  and  Rainier  Company,  of  which  he  became  manager.  Mr. 
Blumensaadt  is  also  the  manager  of  the  Rainier  Land  Company,  which  is  owned  by 
the  same  parties  and  embraces  large  realty  interests,  including  most  of  the  town  of 
Rainier.  His  active  interest  in  public  affairs  may  be  judged  by  the  fact  that  he  took 
out  his  first  papers  as  a  citizen  of  the  United  States  within  ten  days  after  his  arrival 
in  this  country. 

Mr.  Blumensaadt  was  married  in  1916  to  Miss  Mabel  Bentley,  daughter  of  John 
B.   Bentley.   a   retired  farmer,  who  was  at   one   time  deputy  United   States   marshal   of 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  119 

Oregon,  Mrs.  Blumensaadt  is  active  in  public  affairs  and  is  a  general  favorite  in 
Rainier.  She  is  a  member  of  the  Eastern  Star,  and  leader  of  the  Camp  Fire  Girls. 
Mr.  Blumensaadt  has  taken  a  deep  interest  in  the  affairs  of  his  town  and  county, 
having  held  many  positions  that  tend  to  benefit  his  tellowmen.  He  was  secretary  of 
the  Commercial  Club  in  Odense  before  coming  to  America,  and  was  for  four  years 
secretary  of  the  Commercial  Club  of  Rainier.  He  is  an  enthusiastic  advocate  of 
good  roads,  was  active  in  the  building  of  the  Columbia  River  Highway  through  Rainier, 
is  a  member  of  the  Oregon  State  Chamber  of  Commerce,  having  attended  its  first  meet- 
ing, and  a  member  of  the  Interstate  Realty  Association.  Mr.  Blumensaadt  is  one  of 
the  Rainier  board  of  water  commissioners,  and  a  member  of  the  Gun  Club.  Frater- 
nally he  has  membership  with  the  Masons,  is  secretary  of  his  lodge,  and  a  Knight  of 
Pythias,  in  which  organization  he  has  filled  all  of  the  chairs  and  acted  as  district 
deputy  grand  master.  He  is  a  republican  in  politics  and  was  secretary  and  one  of 
the  organizers  of  the  first  Harding  and  Stansfield  Club  in  the  state.  No  public  enter- 
prise is  started  in  this  section  of  the  county  but  is  certain  of  his  hearty  cooperation 
for  he  is  conceded  to  be  one  of  Rainier's  best  citizens. 


THOMAS  F.  RYAN. 


There  is  no  resident  of  Oregon  who  has  done  more  for  the  material  advancement 
and  progress  of  the  state  than  Thomas  F.  Ryan  of  Oregon  City,  who,  besides  holding 
many  public  offices  of  importance,  is  a  well  known  lawyer  and  real  estate  man.  He 
is  a  native  of  Rhode  Island  born  in  the  city  of  Providence,  that  state,  in  the  year  1859. 
His  father,  James  Ryan,  was  for  many  years  engaged  in  the  wool  manufacturing 
business  in  Massachusetts  and  Rhode  Island  and  was  a  prominent  citizen  of  every  com- 
munity  in   which   he   resided. 

Judge  Ryan,  as  the  subject  of  this  review  is  commonly  called,  received  a  good 
elementary  education  and  early  in  life  learned  the  trade  of  his  father.  He  engaged 
in  this  business,  in  which  he  continued  until  1S79,  when  he  became  traveling  corre- 
spondent for  the  Boston  and  Providence  papers  and  for  two  years  served  in  this  con- 
nection. He  then  removed  to  Colorado  and  engaged  in  mining  for  some  time,  and  in 
1881  came  to  the  Pacific  coast  and  took  a  position  with  the  Brownsville  Woolen  Mill 
in  Linn  county.  In  1882  he  came  to  Oregon  City  and  accepted  a  position  with  the 
Oregon  City  Woolen  Manufacturing  Company  and  remained  in  this  position  for  some 
three  years,  when  he  purchased  and  ran  the  Cliff  House  hotel  and  in  1S88  entered  the 
real  estate  business  and  also  commenced  the  study  of  law.  Previous  to  that  year,  in 
1887,  Mr.  Ryan  had  been  elected  mayor  of  the  City  of  Oregon,  which  act  clearly  mani- 
fested the  confidence  and  faith  placed  in  him  by  his  fellowmen.  This  office  he  filled 
so  successfully  that  he  was  much  sought  after  to  fill  other  offices  of  public  service.  He 
then  held  the  office  of  water  commissioner  and  in  1892  was  elected  city  recorder.  In 
1898,  his  ability  as  a  lawyer  being  widely  recognized.  Judge  Ryan  was  elected  county 
judge  and  in  1902  he  was  reelected  to  succeed  himself  by  the  largest  majority  ever 
given  a  candidate  in  the  county.  He  also  acted  as  chief  of  the  fire  department  and 
since  his  service  in  that  capacity  his  motto  has  been  "live  and  active  service."  What- 
ever Judge  Ryan  has  set  out  to  do  he  has  done  and  successfully.  No  matter  how 
difficult  the  task  he  has  by  grim  determination  reached  the  goal  he  has  sought.  Always 
interested  in  the  intellectual  and  moral  development  of  his  community  Judge  Ryan 
for  eight  years  served  as  clerk  of  the  school  board.  From  1911  to  1919  he  served  as 
deputy  state  treasurer,  which  position  he  filled  to  the  best  of  his  ability.  Besides  the 
many  public  offices  Judge  Ryan  has  been  of  great  commercial  service.  He  is  president 
of  the  Bank  of  Commerce  of  Oregon  City,  president  of  the  Carber  State  Bank,  president 
of  the  Coppy  Falls  Electric  Company,  president  of  the  Rex  Motor  Company  and  also 
of  the  Clackamas  County  Auto  &  Tractor  Company  and  president  of  the  Columbia  High- 
lands Company.  This  line  of  business  well  illustrates  Judge  Ryan's  versatility  and 
adaptability  to  all  forms  of  business  activity.  There  are  few  men  who  have  devoted 
so  much  time  to  the  public  and  private  interests  of  their  city  as  Judge  Ryan. 

Perhaps  a  great  degree  of  Judge  Ryan's  success  may  be  attributed  to  his  wife,  who 
was  before  her  marriage  Miss  Inez  Marshall,  a  member  of  one  of  the  most  prominent 
families  of  the  state  and  a  descendant  of  the  Marshalls  of  Maryland  and  the  Choates 
of  Massachusetts.  Their  marriage  occurred  in  the  year  1897.  Prior  to  her  marriage 
Mrs.  Ryan  devoted  herself  to  the  high  profession  of  educator  and  she  is  widely  known 


120  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

throughout  the  community  as  a  woman  of  much  talent  and  literary  ability.  She  has 
always  been  prominent  in  social  and  literary  circles  and  is  a  past  grand  matron  of 
the  Eastern  Star  of  Oregon.  During  the  past  five  years  ill  health  has  caused  her 
practically  to  retire  from  social  activities.  Judge  and  Mrs.  Ryan  are  the  parents  of 
four  children:  Marshall,  the  eldest  son,  is  the  secretary  of  the  Clackamas  County 
Auto  &  Tractor  Company  and  of  the  Rex  Motor  Company  and  is  a  young  business  man 
of  great  promise.  The  second  son,  Donald,  is  a  student  at  the  Reed  College  and  in 
his  freshman  year  had  the  honor  of  acting  as  president  of  the  freshman  class.  He 
is  active  in  athletics  and  is  a  young  man  regarded  as  having  a  brilliant  future  before 
him.  There  were  triplet  girls  born  to  Judge  and  Mrs.  Ryan  of  which  two  survive,  they 
being  Elizabeth  and  Virginia,  who  are  receiving  their  elementary  education  in  the 
graded  schools  of  Oregon  City.  The  entire  family  is  held  in  high  regard  in  the  com- 
munity and  is  a  family  of  which  Oregon  City  may  well  be  proud. 

Along  with  the  honor  of  holding  many  important  public  offices  Judge  Ryan  has 
the  distinction  of  being  the  oldest  living  chief  of  the  fire  department,  mayor  of  the 
city,  city  recorder,  past  master  of  Multnomah  Lodge,  No.  1,  and  high  priest  of  Clackamas 
Chapter,  No.  2,  of  Masons.  In  fraternal  organizations  Judge  Ryan  is  also  prominent. 
He  has  held  many  high  positions  in  fraternal  orders  and  as  an  Odd  Fellow  has  held 
every  office  in  the  gift  of  that  organization  and  is  past  grand  patriarch  of  the  Grand 
Encampment  and  past  grand  master  of  the  grand  lodge.  He  was  one  of  the  organizers 
of  the  Muscovits  and  is  past  counselor  commander.  He  is  past  grand  chancellor  of  the 
Ancient  Order  of  the  United  Workmen  and  as  a  member  of  the  ^Masonic  fraternity  has 
attained  the  thirty-second  degree,  entered  the  Shrine  and  is  a  past  grand  high  priest. 
In  politics  he  has  always  taken  an  active  part  and  he  served  the  state  to  the  best  of  his 
ability  as  state  senator  from  Clackamas  county.  As  an  able  lawyer  he  is  a  member  of 
the  Oregon  Bar  Association  and  is  very  active  in  that  organization. 

For  such  a  public-spirited  man  as  Judge  Ryan  rest  is  a  vital  necessity  and  he  has 
built  a  beautiful  home  on  a  farm  near  Oregon  City,  where  he  enjoys  such  vacations  as 
his  business  life  will  permit.  On  this  farm  he  has  raised  pedigreed  Jersey  cattle 
but  the  product  in  which  he  takes  a  just  pride  is  his  peaches,  which  have  been  exhib- 
ited at  the  Louisiana  Purchase  Exposition  at  St.  Louis,  the  Alaska-Yukon-Pacific  Expo- 
sition at  Seattle,  the  Lewis  &  Clark  Exposition  at  Portland,  and  the  Panama  Pacific 
Exposition  at  San  Francisco,  winning  the  blue  ribbon  for  Oregon  in  each  instance. 

There  is  certainly  no  more  prominent  and  public-spirited  man  throughout  Clackamas 
county  than  Judge  Ryan  and  the  county  ajid  his  home  town  owe  him  a  debt  of  gratitude 
for  the  many  things  he  has  done  for  Oregon.  The  record  of  his  life  is  open  and  clear 
and  as  his  great  success  in  life  proves  he  is  a  man  of  force,  energy,  determination  and 
sound  business  judgment.  Fortunate,  indeed,  is  Oregon  City  in  having  Judge  Ryan 
and  his  family  numbered  among  its  citizens. 


FRANK  EDMOND  WATKINS. 

Frank  Edmond  Watkins  has  won  distinction  in  many  lines  of  endeavor.  Since 
1900  he  has  been  a  partner  in  the  real  estate  firm  of  Parrish,  Watkins  &  Company, 
which  was  established  in  Portland  in  1867  under  the  style  of  Parrish  &  Atkinson.  Il 
is  the  oldest  enterprise  of  that  character  in  the  city  and  through  the  years  lliat  have 
since  intervened  the  firm  has  maintained  a  position  of  leadership  in  real  estate  circles 
of  Portland.  Mr.  Watkins  has  attained  high  rank  in  Masonry,  is  also  prominent  in 
amateur  athletic  circles  and  as  a  breeder  and  fancier  of  prize-winning  bull  terriers. 

A  son  of  George  Edmond  and  Olive  (Clay)  Watkins,  Frank  E.  Watkins  was  born 
on  his  father's  farm  in  Wasco  county,  Oregon,  on  the  20th  of  September,  1877.  His 
paternal  grandfather.  George  Watkins,  married  Helen  Caldwell,  of  St.  Louis,  Missouri 
and  the  town  of  Watkinsville,  New  York,  was  named  in  his  honor.  They  became  pioneer 
settlers  of  Oregon,  starting  across  the  plains  with  ox  teams  from  St.  Louis  in  1852, 
when  the  father  was  but  seven  years  of  age.  In  the  maternal  line  the  family  has  had 
an  unbroken  record  since  1682,  when  Christopher  Pennock  settled  in  Pennsylvania. 
The  maternal  grandfather,  Oliver  Clay,  was  a  resident  of  Massillon,  Ohio.  He  married 
Jane  Elliot  of  Randolph,  Ohio,  and  in  1859,  when  his  daughter  Olive,  who  became  the 
mother  of  Frank  Edmond  Watkins,  was  four  years  of  age  they  left  Massillon  for 
Oregon,  rounding  the  Horn  in  a  sailing  vessel.  George  E.  Watkins  and  Olive  Clay 
were  married   in   Portland  on  the  1st  of  September,  1874,  and  they  became  the  parents 


PRANK   E.   WATKINS 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  123 

of  three  children,  of  whom  the  firstborn,  a  son,  died  in  infancy.  The  next  in  order  of 
birth  was  Frank  Edmond  of  this  review.  Mrs.  Grace  W.  Story,  the  youngest  of  the 
family,  was  born  in  Portland,  May  29,  1880,  and  is  the  mother  of  one  son,  George 
Watkins  Story,  whose  birth  occurred  on  the  20th  of  August,  1908.  Mr.  Watkins'  paternal 
aunt,  Sarah  Jane  Watkins,  married  Lewis  Marion  Parrish  who  also  crossed  the  con- 
tinent with  ox  teams  in  1S52.  In  association  with  the  late  J.  L.  Atkinson  he  established 
the  first  real  estate,  rental,  insurance  and  mortgage  loan  business  in  Portland  in  1867, 
under  the  firm  style  of  Parrish  &  Atkinson.  This  was  succeeded  by  the  firm  of  Parrish, 
Watkins  &  Connell,  which  afterward  became  known  as  Parrish  &  Watkins,  and  sub- 
sequently as  Parrish,  Watkins  &  Company,  under  which  style  the  business  is  now 
conducted  by  Frank  E.  Watkins  of  this  review. 

Upon  his  graduation  from  the  Portland  (now  known  as  the  Lincoln)  high  school 
in  the  summer  of  1894  Mr.  Watkins  first  became  identified  with  the  firm  of  Parrish 
&  Watkins,  which  was  composed  of  his  uncle  and  father,  being  employed  as  bookkeeper 
and  collector.  He  had  prepared  to  enter  Stanford  University,  but  abandoned  his  college 
course  to  devote  his  attention  to  a  commercial  career.  His  ready  adaptability  and 
keen  discernment  soon  made  him  familiar  with  every  phase  of  the  business  and  in 
1900  he  was  admitted  to  a  partnership,  at  which  time  the  firm  name  became  Parrish, 
Watkins  &  Company,  and  under  that  style  the  business  has  since  been  conducted.  Lewis 
M.  Parrish,  the  uncle  of  Frank  E.  Watkins,  passed  away  in  February,  1908.  and  he 
and  his  father  continued  the  business  together  until  the  latter's  demise  on  the  6th  of 
April,  1916.  Mr.  Watkins  has  since  successfully  managed  the  business,  which  during 
the  fifty-four  years  of  its  existence  has  ever  maintained  a  foremost  place  among  real 
estate  firms  of  Portland.  In  business  matters  his  judgment  has  always  been  found  to 
be  sound  and  reliable  and  his  enterprise  unfaltering  and  he  is  ably  carrying  forward 
the  interests  intrusted  to  his  care,  proving  a  worthy  successor  to  his  honored   father. 

Mr.  Watkins  has  been  married  twice.  His  first  union  was  with  Helen  Chambreau, 
whom  he  wedded  on  the  20th  of  September,  1898.  His  second  union  was  with  Mabel 
Claire  Hockman,  whom  he  married  on  the  9th  of  July,  1920,  and  they  have  a  son,  bom 
May  18,  1921. 

Mr.  Watkins  has  always  voted  the  straight  republican  ticket  and  regards  Theodore 
Roosevelt  as  our  greatest  American,  which  opinion  is  shared  by  thousands  of  others 
both  in  this  country  and  abroad.  He  has  been  called  to  public  office,  having  served 
for  four  years,  from  July  1,  1909,  to  July  1,  1913,  as  city  councilman  from  the  old 
fifth  ward.  He  is  an  ardent  motorist  and  good  roads  advocate  and  for  several  years 
served  on  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  old  Portland  Automobile  Club  and  its  successor, 
the  present  Oregon  State  Motor  Association,  now  acting  as  one  of  its  directors,  while 
during  the  years  1917  and  191S  he  was  president  of  the  organization. 

He  is  prominent  in  the  Masonic  order,  having  served  seven  years  in  the  blue  lodge 
chairs  and  is  a  past  master  of  Harmony  Lodge,  No.  12,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.  He  is  also  a 
member  of  Portland  Chapter,  No.  3.  R.  A.  M.;  of  Washington  Council,  No.  3,  R.  &  S.  M.; 
Oregon  Commandery,  No.  1.  K.  T.,  of  which  he  is  a  life  member;  Oregon  Consistory, 
No.  1,  A.  &  A.  S.  R..  in  which  he  has  attained  the  thirty-second  degree;  and  Al  Kader 
Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  is  also  connected  with  Myrtle  Chapter,  No.  15,  O. 
E.  S.;  Gul-Reazee  Grotto,  No.  65,  M.  O.  V.  P.  E.  R.;  Portland  Lodge,  No.  142,  B.  P.  0. 
E.;  the  Woodmen  of  the  World;  the  Royal  Arcanum;  and  the  Knights  of  The  Macca- 
bees. 

Mr.  Watkins  has  been  very  prominent  in  amateur  athletics  as  a  member  of  the 
famous  Multnomah  Amateur  Athletic  Club  of  Portland  and  in  1905  was  presented  with 
the  honorar>-  life  membership,  being  one  of  the  very  few  of  its  members  to  receive 
this  mark  of  distinction,  which  is  conferred  in  recognition  of  distinguished  services 
rendered  the  club  as  an  athlete  and  in  other  connections.  He  Joined  the  club  as  a 
junior  member  in  July,  1892,  when  the  organization  was  but  a  little  over  a  year  old 
and  he  has  been  a  member  of  its  track,  baseball,  basket-ball  and  bowling  teams.  He 
was  twice  captain  of  its  track  and  baseball  teams  and  has  won  many  medals  and  trophies 
as  a  jumper,  vaulter  and  handball  player.  For  three  years  he  held  the  northwest 
championship  handball  title  and  also  defeated  the  best  California  players  in  their  own 
courts  two  different  years.  He  has  also  won  medals  as  a  long  distance  swimmer  and 
for  a  number  of  years  acted  as  swimming  commissioner  for  the  club,  being  largely 
responsible  for  the  development  of  its  splendid  team  of  men  and  women  champion 
swimmers  and  divers.  For  two  years  he  has  served  as  a  member  of  the  club's  board 
of  trustees  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Portland  realty  board. 

Mr.  Watkins   is  known  all  over  the  United   States  as  an   amateur   sportsman   and 


124  IIISTOKV  OF  OREGON 

dog  breeder  and  fancier.  A  few  years  ago  he  bred  the  winning  strain  of  bull  terriers 
that  won  many  prizes  in  the  east  and  south  and  on  one  occasion  one  of  his  bull  terriers 
won  the  American  championship  at  Philadelphia,  defeating  the  best  specimens  of  that 
breed  in  the  United  States  and  Canada.  For  several  years  he  was  a  member  of  the 
board  of  trustees  of  the  Portland  Kennel  Club  and  for  one  year  served  as  its  president. 
Mr.  Watkins  is  also  serving  as  chairman  of  the  Portland  Boxing  Commission  which 
controls  professional  boxing  in  this  city  under  the  state  law,  having  been  appointed 
to  that  position  by  Mayor  George  L.  Baker  when  the  law  became  operative  in  May, 
1919.  He  likewise  acted  as  manager  of  boxing  bouts  for  Mayor  Baker  under  the  former 
city  ordinance  in  1917  and  1918  and  during  the  recent  World  war  Mr.  Watkins'  boxing 
commission  turned  over  as  its  earnings  to  the  Oregon  Boys'  Emergency  Fund  for 
disabled  and  dependent  Oregon  soldiers  and  their  families,  about  thirty-five  hundred 
dollars.  He  enlisted  in  the  Tanks  Corps  during  the  war  with  Germany  but  was  pre- 
vented from  seeing  active  service,  being  finally  rejected  at  Fort  Lawton  on  account 
of  an  old  fracture  of  the  elbow  received  years  before  in  an  athletic  contest.  His  has 
been  a  life  of  well  balanced  activities,  characterized  by  the  attainment  of  a  position 
of  leadership  in  every  line  of  endeavor  to  which  he  has  directed  his  attention.  His 
record  measures  up  to  the  full  standard  of  honorable  manhood  and  those  who  know 
him  recognize  in  him  a  citizen  whose  loyalty  to  the  public  welfare  has  never  been 
questioned,  while  his  integrity  and  honor  in  the  private  affairs  of  life  are  matters 
familiar  to  all  with  whom  he  has  been  associated.  Portland  is  fortunate  in  numbering 
him  among  her  citizens  for  he  is  a  man  who  would  be  a  valuable  acquisition  to  any 
community. 


ERNEST  ARTHUR  WOODS.  M.  D. 

Nathaniel  Woods  came  to  America  from  his  birthplace  in  England  about  1670  and 
upon  growing  to  manhood  married  a  descendant  of  Joshua  Stevens,  whose  wife,  Migail 
Stevens,  was  the  descendant  of  one  of  the  pilgrims  who  came  over  on  the  Mayflower. 
The  son  of  Nathaniel  Woods,  Caleb  Woods,  was  born  in  1737  and  his  sons  fought  in  the 
American  Revolution.  One  of  his  younger  sons,  Stephen  J.,  was  born  in  1771  and  his 
son,  also  named  Stephen  J.,  was  born  in  ISOl.  The  latter  had  a  son  named  Joshua, 
born  in  1848,  who  married  Martha  Elizabeth  Huggins  and  in  1875  there  was  born  to 
them  at  Chicago,  Illinois,  Ernest  Arthur  Woods,  now  a  specialist  in  Ashland,  Oregon. 
The  family  lived  in  Massachusetts  for  many  years  but  at  length  Joshua  G.  Woods 
removed  to  Chicago,  where  he  engaged  in  the  live  stock  commission  business  until  his 
death  in  1910. 

Ernest  A.  Woods  was  educated  in  the  grade  schools  of  Chicago,  and  the  Englewood 
high  school  and  in  due  time  entered  the  University  of  Chicago,  from  which  institution 
he  was  graduated  in  1893  with  the  degree  of  A.  B.  He  then  accepted  a  clerkship  in  the 
First  National  Bank  of  Chicago,  in  two  years  rising  to  the  exchange  teller's  desk.  Decid- 
ing upon  a  medical  career  he  then  entered  the  medical  department  of  the  University 
of  Minnesota  in  1895  and  was  graduated  in  1S99,  as  a  member  of  the  first  class  to  pur- 
sue the  new  four  years'  course  in  that  institution.  Having  secured  his  M.  D.  degree 
he  began  practice  at  Clear  Lake,  Minnesota,  and  remained  there  for  ten  years,  build- 
ing up  an  extensive  and  lucrative  practice.  While  practicing  in  Clear  Lake  he  was 
local  surgeon  of  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad  and  was  active  in  civic  affairs  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  school  board,  of  the  city  council  and  district  health  officer.  Upon  the  failure 
of  his  health  Dr.  Woods  determined  to  regain  it  on  the  Pacific  coast  and  upon  looking 
around  for  a  location  to  his  liking,  both  as  to  climate  and  people,  he  selected  Ashland, 
Jackson  county,  Oregon,  and  since  1910  has  practiced  in  that  city.  For  five  years  pre 
vious  to  his  location  in  Ashland  he  had  practiced  in  Rogue  river,  being  a  member  of 
the  city  council  of  that  place  and  president  and  secretary  of  the  Commercial  Club. 
In  1915  Dr.  Woods  decided  to  specialize  in  eye,  ear,  nose  and  throat,  having  taken  a 
postgraduate  course  along  that  line  in  1908  at  the  Eye,  Ear,  Nose  and  Throat  Hospital 
at  Chicago.  He  has  since  that  time  devoted  his  talent  to  that  specialty  and  has  won 
wide  fame  throughout  southern  Oregon  and   northern  California. 

In  1901  occurred  the  marriage  of  Dr.  Woods  and  Miss  Adel  Anna  Anderson,  a 
graduate  of  the  St.  Cloud  Normal  School  and  a  daughter  of  A.  0.  Anderson,  one  of 
the  best  known  and  most  successful  Minnesota  farmers.  Four  children  have  been  born 
to   their   union:    Chester  Y.,   Harvey   A.,   Marcus   B.  and   Clarence   A.     The   three   older 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  125 

children  are  students  in  tlie  high  and  junior  high  school  of  Ashland  and  the  youngest 
son  is  still  in  the  grade  schools.  Mrs.  Woods  is  active  in  social  and  club  affairs  and 
quite  musical  in  her  tastes.  She  is  frequently  in  demand  for  musical  affairs  and  is 
active  in  musical  clubs  as  well  as  the  French   Club. 

Dr.  Woods  affiliates  with  the  Masonic  order  onis'.  He  is  ex-president  of  the 
Southern  Oregon  Medical  Society,  a  member  of  the  State  Medical  Society,  the  American 
Medical  Association,  and  the  Pacific  Oto-Ophthalmological  Society.  While  quite  a  stu- 
dent of  his  profession  he  finds  much  recreation  in  the  out  of  doors  and  is  fond  of  all 
athletic  sports.  Aside  from  his  professional  work  Dr.  Woods  has  been  active  in  civic 
affairs,  and  his  value  to  Ashland  and  southern  Oregon,  both  as  a  physician  and  a 
citizen,  is  readily  conceded. 


JOHN  HENRY  BURGARD. 


A  prominent  figure  in  business  circles  of  Portland  is  John  Henry  Burgard,  of  John 
H.  Burgard  &  Company,  engaged  in  the  sale  of  general  insurance  and  surety  bonds, 
and  his  influence  is  one  of  broadening  activity  and  strength  in  the  field  in  which  he 
operates.  He  is  proving  energetic,  resourceful  and  farsighted  in  the  management  of 
the  extensive  business  of  which  he  is  the  head  and  success  in  substantial  measure  has 
rewarded  his  efforts.  Mr.  Burgard  is  a  native  of  the  east.  He  was  born  at  Buffalo,  in 
Erie  county.  New  York.  January  1,  1865,  a  son  of  Charles  and  Elizabeth  (Reinhardt) 
Burgard.  The  father  was  born  near  Metz,  France,  where  the  village  of  Beauregard  now 
stands  and  which  has  been  the  home  of  the  Beauregards  for  centuries,  the  present  manner 
of  spelling  the  name  having  been  adopted  by  the  Protestant  branch  of  the  family,  owing 
to  religious  persecution. 

In  the  public  and  high  schools  of  his  native  city  John  H.  Burgard  acquired  his  edu- 
cation and  in  1880  he  first  became  identified  with  the  general  insurance  business  in 
Buffalo,  with  which  he  was  there  connected  until  1888,  when  he  sought  the  opportunities 
offered  in  the  west,  making  his  way  to  Portland,  where  he  has  since  resided.  Here  he 
engaged  in  the  general  insurance  business  in  association  with  George  A.  and  James 
Steel  under  the  firm  style  of  G.  A.  Steel  &  Company,  who  acted  as  general  agents  in  the 
northwest  for  several  companies,  and  at  a  subsequent  date  he  organized  an  independent 
business  venture,  of  which  he  is  now  the  head,  conducting  his  interests  under  the  name 
of  John  H.  Burgard  &  Company.  He  sells  general  insurance,  in  which  connection  he 
has  built  up  a  large  patronage,  for  he  thoroughly  understands  the  business,  having  de- 
voted his  entire  life  to  this  branch  of  commercial  activity,  and  he  also  deals  in  surety 
bonds,  being  equally  successful  along  this  line.  His  resourceful  business  ability  and 
initiative  spirit  have  also  led  him  into  other  connections  and  in  1890  he  was  one  of  the 
organizers  of  the  Metropolitan  Street  Railway  Company,  of  which  he  became  secretary. 
This  was  the  first  electric  line  established  in  Portland,  its  route  being  on  Second  street 
to  Fulton  Park,  and  the  Fulton  Park  right  of  way  is  now  being  used  by  the  Oregon 
Electric  Railroad.  In  1918  he  became  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Columbia  Pacific 
Shipping  Company,  which  built  up  a  large  transportation  business,  operating  at  one 
time  from  forty  to  fifty  vessels,  which  were  sent  from  this  port  to  all  parts  of  the  world, 
while  they  now  have  a  fleet  of  about  twenty-five  vessels.  Other  interests  have  also  felt 
the  stimulus  of  the  enterprise,  business  acumen  and  well  defined  plans  of  Mr.  Burgard, 
who  is  serving  as  a  director  of  the  Alaska  Pacific  Fisheries,  which  operates  three  salmon 
canneries  and  is  one  of  the  largest  enterprises  of  this  character  in  the  northwest,  and 
he  is  likewise  on  the  directorate  of  the  West  Oregon  Lumber  Company,  the  Oregon  Timber 
Mill,  the  Oregon  Electric  Railway  Company  and  the  United  Railway  Company.  His  activ- 
ities are  broad  and  varied  and  his  labors  are  resultant  factors  in  whatever  he  undertakes. 
He. possesses  marked  executive  force  and  the  power  to  coordinate  seemingly  diverse 
elements  into  a  unified  and  harmonious  whole,  and  to  him  opportunity  has  spelled 
success. 

In  Rickreall,  Polk  county.  Oregon,  on  the  25th  of  June,  1890.  Mr.  Burgard  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Jessie  Clark,  a  daughter  of  William  Edward  and  Lavina  Clark, 
who  became  early  pioneers  of  Oregon,  having  crossed  the  plains  in  1852  from  Missouri. 
While  en  route  the  grandfather  and  grandmother  of  Mrs.  Burgard  became  victims  of  the 
cholera  epidemic  and  were  buried  on  the  old  trail  somewhere  in  Idaho.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Burgard  have  become  the  parents  of  two  children:  John  Clark  and  William  Norman, 
both  of  whom  served  as  first  lieutenants  in  the  World  war.  the  elder  son  winning  pro- 


126  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

motion  to  the  rank  of  captain.  He  was  a  member  of  Company  H,  Three  Hundred  and 
Sixty-second  Infantry,  Ninety-first  Division,  and  while  serving  with  the  British  forces 
in  Belgium  received  severe  gunshot  wounds,  being  compelled  to  undergo  twelve  opera- 
tions. He  was  awarded  the  Distinguished  Service  Cross  by  the  United  States  govern- 
ment, at  which  time  he  received  the  following  citation:  "For  extraordinary  heroism 
in  action  near  Epinonville,  France,  September  27,  191S.  On  duty  as  battalion  liason 
officer.  Lieutenant  Burgard  was  establishing  the  battalion  post  of  command  at  daybreak, 
when  he  suddenly  discovered  a  party  of  the  enemy  placing  machine  guns  so  as  to  fire 
upon  the  position  from  the  flank.  Firing  a  rifle  to  give  the  alarm.  Lieutenant  Burgard 
advanced  toward  the  enemy,  followed  by  the  battalion  headquarters  group,  whom  he 
led  in  a  vigorous  attack  on  the  hostile  force,  killing  seven  and  capturing  forty-three 
of  the  enemy,  six  machine  guns  and  two  light  machine  rifles,  with  but  one  casualty 
among  his  own  men."  He  has  now  recovered  his  health  to  a  considerable  extent,  owing 
to  an  excellent  constitution,  and  is  engaged  in  business  in  Seattle,  Washington.  William 
Norman  Burgard,  the  younger  son,  was  a  flrst  lieutenant  of  Company  C,  Three  Hundred 
and  Sixty-fourth  Regiment,  Ninety-first  Division,  under  General  Pershing,  and  while 
participating  in  the  terrific  fighting  in  the  Argonne  Forest  he  was  gassed  and  is  still 
suffering  from  the  effects  of  poison.  He  married  Miss  Ruth  Shull  of  Portland,  who 
had  formerly  been  a  resident  of  Minnesota. 

In  his  political  views  John  H.  Burgard  is  a  republican,  active  in  the  ranks  of  the 
party  and  a  stalwart  supporter  of  its  principles  and  candidates.  He  served  as  a  member 
of  the  city  council  from  1910  until  1912,  resigning  in  the  latter  year  to  accept  the  appoint- 
ment of  member  of  public  docks  commission,  which  position  he  still  retains.  In  1918 
he  was  appointed  United  States  wool  administrator  for  the  northwest  zone,  resigning 
that  position  in  the  following  year,  and  in  1919  he  was  made  a  member  of  the  State 
Soldiers  and  Sailors  Commission.  He  likewise  served  as  commissioner  from  Oregon  to 
the  Pan-American  Exposition  at  Buffalo,  New  York,  in  1901  and  has  been  a  member  of 
many  other  public  and  civic  committees  from  time  to  time,  rendering  notably  effective 
public  service  in  every  position  to  which  he  has  been  called.  He  has  served  as  president 
of  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  Patton  Home  for  the  Friendless,  an  old  people's  home,  for 
seventeen  years.  His  religious  faith  is  indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  First  Meth- 
odist Episcopal  church  and  fraternally  he  is  identified  with  the  Masonic  order,  in  whicn 
he  is  prominent,  having  attained  the  thirty  second  degree  in  the  Consistory  and  also 
belonging  to  the  Commandery  and  Shrine,  and  he  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Benevolent 
Protective  Order  of  Elks.  He  is  an  earnest  and  active  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Com- 
merce, heartily  cooperating  in  its  plans  and  projects  for  the  extension  of  the  trade 
relations  of  the  city:  is  a  life  member  of  the  Press  Club  and  one  of  the  original  members 
of  the  Multnomah  Amateur  Athletic  Club,  and  he  also  belongs  to  the  Arlington  Club 
and  the  Waverly  Country  Club.  A  constructive  policy  has  been  followed  by  Mr.  Burgard 
throughout  his  life.  In  his  business  career  he  has  been  a  persistent,  resolute  and  en- 
ergetic worker,  keeping  his  hand  steadily  upon  the  helm  of  his  business  and  manifesting 
at  all  times  strong  executive  power.  Along  the  path  of  opportunity  open  to  all  he  has 
reached  the  goal  of  notable  success,  his  progress  being  due  to  the  tact  that  he  has  recog- 
nized and  utilized  opportunities  which  others  have  passed  heedlessly  by.  His  life  is  an 
exemplary  one  in  all  respects  and  he  has  ever  supported  those  interests  which  are  cal- 
culated to  benefit  humanity,  while  his  own  personal  worth  is  deserving  of  high  com- 
mendation. 


WALLACE   FRANKLIN   GITCHELL. 

Wallace  Franklin  Gitchell  took  up  his  abode  on  his  present  ranch  at  The  Dalles 
in  1918  but  had  been  the  owner  of  the  property  for  a  period  of  ten  years  at  that  time. 
He  was  born  in  Grand  Rapids,  Michigan,  in  1873.  His  parents  were  pioneer  residents 
of  the  state  and  were  representatives  of  old  families  of  New  York  and  Pennsylvania. 
The  mother,  who  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Lucy  Adelia  Shear,  belonged  to  a  family 
that  was  founded  in  New  England  in  early  colonial  days  whose  representatives  fought 
for  American  independence  and  again  contested  the  supremacy  of  England  in  the  War 
of  1812. 

Wallace  F.  Gitchell  was  educated  in  the  graded  schools  of  his  native  city  and  in 
early  life  became  a  messenger  in  the  office  of  the  Standard  Oil  Company  at  Grand 
Rapids.     He   won   advancement   rapidly   and   soon   reached    the   position   of   accountant, 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  127 

having  mastered  the  profession  in  his  leisure  hours.  After  five  years"  service  with  the 
Standard  Oil  Company  he  became  chief  accountant  of  the  Consolidated  Street  Railway 
Company  of  Grand  Rapids  and  upon  its  reorganization  became  the  comptroller.  After 
five  years'  connection  with  the  street  railway  business  he  was  tendered  the  position  of 
comptroller  of  the  British  Columbia  Electric  Railway,  Light  &  Power  Company  and 
removed  to  Vancouver.  On  his  way  to  British  Columbia  he  passed  through  The  Dalles 
in  1908  and  at  that  time  purchased  a  ranch  in  the  southern  outskirts  of  the  city  and 
planted  it  to  cherries.  In  1916  he  retired  from  the  Vancouver  position  and  removed 
to  Yakima,  Washington,  where  he  became  cashier  of  a  bank,  remaining  a  resident  of 
that  city  for  two  years.  He  then  came  to  The  Dalles  and  settled  on  his  ranch.  He 
owns  a  private  irrigation  system  which  is  regarded  by  experts  as  the  best  in  the  vicinity 
and  he  is  most  carefully  and  systematically  developing  the  property,  which  is  today  one 
of  the  valuable  ranches  of  this  section  of  the  country.  He  also  owns  one  hundred  and 
twenty  acres  at  Yakima.  Washington,  and  his  landed  interests  are  returning  to  him  a 
most  gratifying  annual  income. 

In  1907  Mr.  Gitchell  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Edith  Jackson,  a  daughter  of 
J.  W.  Jackson  and  a  granddaughter  of  Captain  Isaac  Smith,  who  was  born  in  Virginia 
in  1815.  At  the  age  of  twenty-eight  years  he  headed  a  band  of  three  hundred  and  fifty 
daring  spirits  and  started  for  the  west.  His  party  blazed  the  trail  across  the  continent, 
fighting  Indians  most  of  the  way,  but  with  all  their  wagons  reached  Oregon  in  the  fall 
of  1S43.  On  arriving  at  Wallula  they  secured  boats  from  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company 
and  traveled  down  the  Columbia  river  to  Celilo  Palls.  There  the  party  disbanded,  after 
which  Captain  Smith  engaged  in  operating  boats  on  the  Columbia  from  Celilo  Falls  to 
Portland.  Later  he  operated  the  first  ferry  across  the  Columbia  river.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  first  territorial  legislature  of  Oregon  and  in  every  way  participated  in 
the  pioneer  development  and  substantial  settlement  of  the  state,  contributing  in  large 
measure  to  that  work  which  constituted  the  foundation  upon  which  has  been  built  the 
present  day  progress  and  prosperity  of  Oregon.  In  1846  he  wedded  Miss  Mary  Northrop, 
a  daughter  of  John  L.  Northrop,  the  founder  of  the  first  educational  institution  of  the 
state  at  Cottage  Grove.  Their  daughter,  Nellie,  became  the  wife  of  John  W.  Jackson 
and  moved  to  Vancouver,  B.  C,  and  Edith  (Jackson)  Gitchell  was  the  first  white  child 
born  in  that  now  prosperous  Canadian  city.  Captain  Smith's  mother  was  Sarah  Light- 
foot  Lee  of  the  historic  Lee  family  of  Virginia.  Mrs.  Gitchell  passed  away  in  1914, 
leaving  a  son,  Jackson  Lee  Gitchell,  who  is  a  sturdy  youngster,  now  a  pupil  in  The 
Dalles  schools.  In  1916  Mr.  Gitchell  married  Margaret  Holcomb,  daughter  of  Guy  Hol- 
comb,  a  pioneer  of  Hillsboro,  Oregon. 

Mr.  Gitchell  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity,  also  belongs  to  the  Benevolent 
Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  the  Woodmen  of  the  World.  His  activities  have  ever  been 
of  a  broad  and  varied  character.  He  is  now  the  sales  agent  of  Chenowith,  the  scenic 
suburb  of  The  Dalles,  which  is  beautifully  located  a  short  distance  from  the  city  on 
the  Columbia  River  highway.  In  all  things  he  has  been  one  hundred  per  cent  American. 
He  was  active  in  support  of  all  the  war  work  and  Red  Cross  drives  and  his  labors  have 
ever  been  far-reaching  and  effective  in  bringing  about  the  upbuilding  of  the  section  in 
which  he  has  made  his  home. 


DREW   PARKER   PRICE. 


Drew  Parker  Price,  an  attorney  of  Portland,  is  numbered  among  those  men  whose 
patriotism  measured  up  to  the  one  hundred  per  cent  American  standard.  Mr.  Price  was 
born  at  Edgar  Station,  Edgar  county,  Illinois,  September  14,  1874.  His  father,  James 
Parker  Price,  was  a  native  of  Ohio,  born  February  14,  1843.  At  the  age  of  nineteen 
years  he  joined  Company  D  of  the  Seventy-ninth  Regiment  of  Illinois  Volunteers  at 
Mattoon,  Illinois,  for  service  in  the  Civil  war.  In  September,  1862,  he  was  assigned  to 
duty  with  the  army  of  the  Cumberland  and  participated  in  the  attack  of  Bragg's  Regi- 
ment, taking  part  in  the  first  battle  at  Perryville.  He  participated  in  several  engage- 
ments and  on  the  31st  of  December,  1862,  was  captured  in  connection  with  twenty-six 
hundred  comrades  at  Murfreesboro  or  Stone  River  and  taken  to  Libby  prison.  There 
he  was  held  for  several  months  and  was  one  of  the  last  six  prisoners  to  leave  that  place 
of  military  confinement.  He  was  discharged  from  active  service  in  September,  1863. 
He  wedded  Mary  C.  Long  and  for  many  years  devoted  his  life  to  the  work  of  the  min- 
istry, as  a  representative  of  the  Society  of  Friends,  taking  up  active  duty  in  the  church 


128  HISTORY  OF  OREGON' 

in  1882.  Through  the  intervening  period  to  the  time  of  his  death  he  had  charges  in 
various  parts  of  the  country.  In  1892  he  came  with  his  wife  to  Oregon,  settling  in 
Newberg.  where  Mrs.  Price  depaited  this  life  in  1895.  Mr.  Price  survived  for  a  number 
of  years  but  was  called  to  his  final  rest  at  Newberg,  October  14,  1911.  In  their  family 
were  six  children,  five  of  whom  survive:  Mrs.  F.  A.  Elliott,  the  wife  of  State  Forester 
Elliott  of  S.ilem;  Mrs.  A.  T.  Hill  of  La  Grande;  Drew  Parker  of  this  review;  O.  L.,  an 
attorney  and  confidential  secretary  to  H.  L.  Pittock  and  F.  \V.  Leadbetter  of  Portland; 
and  Dr.  J.  C.  Price,  a  dentist  of  Reedsport,  Oregon. 

Drew  Parker  Price  obtained  his  preliminary  education  in  Champaign  county,  Illinois, 
and  following  the  removal  of  the  family  to  Oregon,  when  he  was  about  eighteen  years 
of  age,  he  entered  the  Pacific  College  at  Newberg,  a  Quaker  institution,  and  was  there 
graduated  in  1897,  receiving  the  Bachelor  of  Science  degree.  He  determined  upon  the 
practice  of  law  as  a  life  work  and  completed  his  preparation  for  the  bar  as  a  law 
student  in  the  Oregon  University,  receiving  the  LL.  B.  degree  upon  graduation  with 
the  class  of  1900.  In  the  same  year  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar  and  for  a  year  practiced 
in  Newberg,  after  which  he  removed  to  Portland  and  entered  the  employ  of  the  Title 
Guarantee  Trust  Company,  with  which  he  remained  for  about  four  years,  or  until  1906. 
He  then  entered  the  law  office  of  Cake  &  Cake  and  continued  with  them  for  two  years. 
On  the  1st  of  January,  1909,  however,  he  opened  a  law  office  independently  in  Portland, 
where  he  has  since  practiced.  His  ability  has  been  demonstrated  in  the  many  favorable 
verdicts  which  he  has  won  for  his  clients  and  by  his  connection  with  much  important 
litigation  heard  in  the  courts  of  the  district. 

On  the  11th  of  November.  190:^,  in  Portland,  Mr.  Price  was  married  to  Miss  Flora 
M.  Bailey,  a  daughter  of  Joseph  W.  Bailey,  a  native  of  Maine.  Their  children  are  Joe 
Parker,  who  was  born  August  26,  1905;  Margaret  Frances,  born  in  1909;  and  Elliott 
Andrew,  born  September  13,  1911.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Price  have  an  extensive  circle  of  warm 
friends.  In  politics  he  is  a  republican  and  he  served  during  the  World  war  on  the 
legal  advisory  board  and  took  active  part  in  promoting  the  bond  drives  and  the  Red 
Cross  drives.  Mr.  Price  has  membership  with  the  Masons,  Odd  Fellows  and  the  Wood- 
men of  the  World.  His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Presbyterian  denomination  and 
he  is  an  elder  in  the  Westminster  church.  His  aid  and  influence  are  always  given  on 
the  side  of  progress  and  advancement  and  he  has  done  much  to  uphold  the  legal  and 
moral  standards  of  the  community. 


RICHARD   TEMPLE   DAB.VEY. 

Richard  Temple  Dabney  was  born  September  11,  1855,  in  Vermilion  county, 
Illinois,  a  son  of  Henry  and  Maria  (Stanfield)  Dabney.  He  was  descended  from 
Theodore  Agrippa  D'Aubigne  of  France.  The  name  has  undergone  many  changes, 
having  been  written,  de'Bony.  de'Beny,  Daubeney,  Dabnee  and  finally  Dabney.  Early 
in  the  eighteenth  century,  probably  sometime  between  1715  and  1720,  three  Huguenots, 
brothers.  John,  Cornelius  and  Robert  D'Aubigne.  came  to  America  from  England  and 
Wales,  whither  they  had  fled  from  France  at  the  time  of  the  revocation  of  the  edict  of 
Nantes  in  1685,  Robert  settling  in  Massachusetts  and  Cornelius  and  John  in  Virginia. 
They  also  claimed  descent  from  Sir  William  Daubigne  (Knight),  who  went  over  to 
England  from  France  with  William  the  Conqueror,  whose  name  appears  on  the  Battle 
Abbey  Roles,  with  shield  and  armorial  bearings  quite  like  the  Dabney  coat  of  arms,  John 
and  Cornelius  went  to  Virginia  from  Wales.  John  settled  on  the  north  side  of  the 
Pamunky  river,  in  King  William  county,  at  what  has  since  been  known  as  Dabney's 
Ferry,  and  this  became  the  original  nest  of  the  Dabneys  of  King  William  and  Gloucester 
counties.  Cornelius  settled  on  the  south  side  of  this  river.  Cornelius  D'Aubigne,  or 
Dabney,  was  married  in  1721,  in  Virginia,  to  Sarah  Jennens.  or  Jennings,  it  being  his 
second  marriage.  To  this  union  were  born  three  sons  and  six  daugthers.  Their 
eldest  son.  William  Dabney.  married  Miss  Philadelphia  Gauthmey.  Of  this  union 
were  born  six  sons  and  three  daughters.  Their  fourth  son,  Richard  Dabney,  married 
Diana  Gauthmey.  To  this  union  were  born  seven  boys  and  three  girls.  Their 
sixth  son,  Henry,  married  for  his  second  wife  Miss  Maria  Stanfield.  Of  this  union 
there  were  nine  sons  and  three  daughters,  including  Richard  Temple  Dabney,  whose 
name  introduces  this  record.  His  father,  Henry  Dabney,  was  born  December  31, 
1795,  in  King  William  county,  Virginia.  At  the  age  of  sixteen  he  served  in  the  War  of 
1812.     He  and  some  thirty  students  of  the  academy  he  was  attending  volunteered   in  a 


I 


RICHARD   T.   DABNEY 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  131 

liody  and  selecting  their  teacher  as  captain  had  quite  a  skirmish  with  the  British  on 
the  Rappahannock  in  King  and  Queen  county,  Virginia.  There  he  was  made  sergeant. 
After  the  war  he  returned  to  the  old  home  near  Richmond,  Virginia,  and  resided  there 
until  1828.  This  plantation  was  well  equipped  with  fine  horses  and  carriages  and  slaves. 
Being  convinced  that  slavery  was  wrong  he  set  his  slaves  free  and  sold  the  plantation, 
giving  to  each  slave  a  portion  of  the  proceeds.  Later  on  he  removed  to  Terre  Haute, 
Indiana,  where  he  organized  the  First  Methodist  Sunday  school.  While  in  Terre  Haute 
he  met  Miss  Maria  Stanfield,  a  charming  young  lady  of  Nashville,  Tennessee,  whom  he 
afterward  married  in  Vermilion  county,  Illinois,  October  21,  1830.  In  later  years  he 
purchased  a  small  tract  of  prairie  land  in  Madison  county,  Iowa,  and  moved  his  large 
family,  consisting  of  his  wife,  nine  sons  and  three  daughters,  to  that  farm,  there  to 
make  a  home.  Mrs.  Henry  Dabney,  who  in  her  maidenhood  was  Maria  Stanfield,  was 
born  October  11,  1813,  in  Greene  county,  Tennessee.  It  was  said  of  her  that  she  was 
a  true  Christian,  a  devoted  wife  and  mother,  always  doing  deeds  of  kindness  and 
lending  a  helping  hand  to  those  in  need.  She  passed  away  April  10,  1889.  Her  parents 
John  Stanfield  and  Sarah  Dillon  were  married  October  20,  1790,  in  Greene  county, 
Tennessee. 

Richard  Temple  Dabney  moved  with  his  father's  large  family  to  Iowa,  when  a 
small  boy.  They  settled  on  a  farm  in  Madison  county,  near  Winterset,  the  county 
seat,  and  he  attended  a  school  a  mile  and  a  halt  distant  from  his  home.  The  old  log 
schoolhouse  had  a  shake  roof  and  rough  floor.  The  seats  were  made  from  Linn  logs, 
split  in  half,  with  the  flat  side  turned  up  to  sit  on  and  wooden  pegs  for  legs.  The 
school  year  consisted  of  two  terms  of  three  months  each,  summer  and  winter.  When 
Richard  T.  Dabney  was  thirteen  years  of  age,  his  father,  Henry  Dabney,  passed  to 
the  Great  Beyond.  At  that  time  many  of  the  elder  children  of  the  family  had  married 
and  established  homes  of  their  own.  Mrs.  Dabney,  the  mother,  being  unable  to  keep 
up  the  farm,  removed  with  her  two  youngest  sons,  Richard  and  Joseph,  to  Winterset, 
where  Richard  attended  high  school.  Being  of  an  active  disposition  he  greatly  assisted 
his  mother  in  many  ways.  During  the  latter  part  of  his  residence  in  Winterset  he 
studied  law  in  the  office  of  an  older  brother,  Albert  R.  Dabney.  He  also  attended 
commercial  college  in  Davenport,  Iowa,  where  he  afterward  graduated,  but  wishing 
to  follow  a  professional  career  he  took  up  the  study  of  medicine  in  Kansas  City, 
Missouri,  and  worked  to  defray  his  expenses.  His  studies  and  work  were  very  arduous 
there  and  not  having  financial  help  from  any  source  he  felt  compelled  to  make  a  change 
whereby  he  hoped  to  be  benefited. 

In  the  spring  of  1881  Mr.  Dabney  went  to  Montana  with  his  younger  brother 
Joseph.  This  was  before  there  were  any  railroads  in  that  section  and  at  the  time  the 
country  was  wild  and  sparsely  settled.  However,  there  were  plenty  of  Indians,  cow- 
boys and  wild  animals.  Mr.  Dabney  bought  and  sold  lands  in  the  beautiful  Yellow- 
stone valley,  near  where  the  town  of  Livingston  now  stands.  When  fall  came  he 
found  he  had  been  so  successful  in  this  endeavor  that  he  concluded  to  give  up  his 
medical  course  and  remain  in  the  great  west,  where,  with  prophetic  vision,  he  saw  the 
making  of  a  great  empire.  He  spent  several  years  in  Montana,  where  he  was  successful 
in  raising  fine  cattle.  During  the  years  he  lived  in  that  state  he  visited  the  Pacific 
coast  and  made  investments  in  various  parts  of  the  then  territory  of  Washington  and 
also  in  Oregon.  Later,  disposing  of  his  business  interests  in  Montana  he  renewed  his 
activities  on  the  Pacific  coast,  first  in  California,  then  in  Washington  and  Oregon. 
This  was  during  the  years  1881  to  1887.  He  was  a  heavy  investor  in  timber  lands  and 
other  real  estate  along  the  coast  and  was  one  of  the  early  pioneers  of  the  growing 
and  prosperous  city  of  Aberdeen,  on  Grays  Harbor,  Washington.  In  1905  he  purchased 
what  was  known  as  the  Old  Hansen  Home  in  east  Portland,  an  old  landmark  of  the 
earliest  days.  This  was  already  a  beautiful  home,  but  Mr.  Dabney  greatly  improved 
and  beautified  it.  Here  he  established  a  pleasant  and  happy  home  for  his  family  and 
his  hospitality  was  extended  to  all  of  his  friends.  He  was  one  of  the  most  enthusiastic 
advocates  of  the  Columbia  River  Highway  improvement  in  Portland.  He  it  was  who 
suggested  the  establishment  of  hotels  along  the  scenic  boulevard  to  provide  for  the 
comfort  of  tourists.  Quoting  from  one  of  the  leading  Portland  newspapers  at  the  time 
of  his  death:  "Mr.  Dabney  was  the  originator  of  the  plan  to  build  a  large  hotel  and 
summer  resort  on  the  Columbia  River  Highway  at  Crown  Point.  His  business  affairs, 
which  were  extensive,  are  in  the  hands  of  his  two  sons,  Clifford  R.  and  Henry  R.  Dabney, 
who  have  been  associated  with  him  in  the  real  estate  business  for  the  past  few  years. 
He  was  the  owner  of  a  beautiful  summer  home  on  the  Sandy  river,  known  as  Dabney 
Park,  which  now  borders  the  Columbia  River  Highway." 


132  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

Mr.  Dabney  was  only  a  child  at  the  time  of  the  Civil  war  in  1861.  but  several 
of  his  elder  brothers  served  during  that  crisis.  His  nephews  served  in  the  Spanish  war 
and  his  son,  Clifford  R.  Dabney,  served  eighteen  months  in  the  late  World  war.  The 
D'Aubignes  or  Dabneys,  it  is  stated,  planned  with  other  Huguenots,  the  American 
Revolution  in  1776,  as  the  history  of  the  family  in  Virginia  amply  proves  and  with  the 
aid  of  the  Covenanters  they  fought  it  through  successfully.  Mr.  Dabney's  friends  often 
tried  to  prevail  on  him  to  accept  positions  of  trust  in  the  city  and  state  government, 
but  being  engaged  in  more  rugged  lines  of  business,  he  declined  them.  He  was  an  ardent 
and  strong  supporter  of  the  government  of  this  country  and  was  affiliated  with  the 
republican   party. 

While  living  in  Aberdeen,  Washington,  Mr.  Dabney  joined  the  Knights  of  Pythias 
lodge.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Portland  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  in  early  life  was 
a  member  of  the  Methodist  church. 

Mr.  Dabney  was  married  October  12,  1887,  at  Winterset,  Iowa,  to  Miss  Martha 
Amanda  Renshaw,  a  daughter  of  Leonidas  and  Angeline  Renshaw.  Mrs.  Dabney  was 
born  in  Madison  county,  Iowa,  September  30,  1868,  and  was  one  of  the  leading  school 
teachers  of  her  county,  a  young  lady  highly  respected  and  an  active  worker  in  all  the 
various  organizations  of  the  community  in  which  she  lived.  With  her  older  sister,  Effie 
Renshaw,  she  attended  Simpson  College  at  Indianola,  Iowa,  of  which  her  two  brothers. 
Byron  and  Oscar,  were  graduates.  Her  father,  Leonidas  Renshaw,  was  born  in  Pennsyl- 
vania in  1839,  of  hardy  Scotch  and  English  parentage.  He  was  a  member  of  a  large 
family  of  four  boys  and  five  girls,  who  early  immigrated  with  their  father,  G.  S. 
Renshaw,  to  Iowa.  This  family  all  grew  to  manhood  and  womanhood,  possessing  the 
sterling  qualities  that  make  good  citizens.  Leonidas  Renshaw  passed  away  at  his  home 
in  Portland,  Oregon,  at  the  age  of  eighty-one  years.  Jlrs.  Dabney's  mother,  who  was 
Miss  Angeline  Howard  Alger,  was  a  native  of  New  England  and  of  Puritan  parentage. 
She  was  born  in  Cochesett,  Plymouth  county,  Massachusetts,  November  25,  1846.  She 
taught  school  in  Clayton  county,  Iowa,  where  her  parents  and  also  Mr.  Renshaw's 
parents  at  one  time  resided.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Renshaw  were  married  at  Elkader,  Clayton 
county,  Iowa,  March  14,  1867.  Mrs.  Renshaw's  father,  the  Rev.  Simeon  Alger,  was  born 
in  Plymouth  county,  Massachusetts,  April  27,  1817,  and  went  to  Iowa  in  the  early  '50s. 
where  he  was  one  of  the  pioneer  preachers  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  in  the 
eastern  part  of  the  state.  He  established  the  first  Methodist  class  in  Manchester,  Iowa, 
and  passed  away  April  9,  1894.  The  mother  of  Mrs.  Leonidas  Renshaw  was  Miss 
Mary  Amanda  Howard,  who  was  born  in  Cochesett,  Massachusetts.  May  2,  1823.  She 
was   an   estimable  woman   and   gi-eatly  beloved   by   her   family   and   friends. 

Eight  children  were  born  to  Richard  Temple  and  Martha  Amanda  Dabney,  five 
daughters  and  three  sons.  One  daughter  passed  away  in  infancy.  The  third  son, 
Howard  Leonidas  Dabney,  passed  away  February  12,  1914,  at  the  age  of  nineteen  years. 
He  won  high  honors  at  Culver  Military  Academy  of  Indiana,  of  which  he  was  a  student. 
The  six  remaining  children  are;  Clifford  Richard,  Henry  Renshaw,  Doris  Martha, 
Virginia  Evelyn,  Charlotte  Ellen,  and  Eleanor  Esther  Dabney.  Clifford  Richard  and 
Henry  Renshaw  Dabney  received  their  education  in  the  high  schools  of  Portland, 
Oregon.  Culver  Military  Academy  and  Stanford  University,  after  which  they  were 
associated  with  their  father  in  business  and  are  now  making  their  home  in  Los  Angeles, 
California,  where  they  are  successfully  engaged  in  the  oil  industry.  Clifford  Richard 
Dabney  married  Miss  Alice  May  Mosier  of  Edmonton,  Alberta,  Canada,  and  they  have 
one  daughter,  Marjorie  Alice;  Henry  Renshaw  Dabney  married  Miss  Florence  Westen- 
gard  of  Portland,  Oregon,  and  they  have  two  sons,  Richard  Westengard  and  Robert 
Henry  Dabney;  Doris  Martha  Dabney  received  her  education,  musical  and  otherwise, 
in  the  graded  schools  and  in  Miss  Catlin's  Private  school  in  Portland,  Oregon,  also  in 
Cumnock  School  of  Los  Angeles,  California;  Virginia  Evelyn,  Charlotte  Ellen  and 
Eleanor  Esther  Dabney  are  industrious  pupils  of  the  graded  and  music  schools  of 
Portland,  Oregon,  where  they  now  reside  with  their  mother,  who  is  occupying  the  old 
home  in  the  Rose  city. 

"Richard  Temple  Dabney  passed  from  the  activities  of  a  strenuous  life  February 
3,  1916,  at  his  home  in  Portland,  Oregon,  at  the  age  of  sixty  years.  To  Mr.  Dabney 
this  passing  was  only  a  revelation  of  the  certainties  of  the  wonderful  and  beautiful 
lite  which  he  had  always  ascribed  to  the  unseen  spirit  world  beyond.  To  him  every 
flower,  however  meek  and  lowly,  the  swaying  of  the  big  pines,  the  fragrance  of  every 
shrub  and  plant,  the  carol  of  the  earliest  songsters  and  the  soft  good-night  chirp  of  the 
tiny  bird  under  its  mother's  wing,  were  all  voices  from  the  Great  Spirit  that  had  given 
him   existence.     These   were  his   religion.     He  would   often  say,   'Here   and   among  the 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  133 

great  heavenly  planets  is  where  I  see  God.'  He  did  not  hesitate  when  the  call  came,  to 
lay  his  hand  iu  that  of  the  Master,  and  pass  on  to  his  reward.  Though  Mr.  Dabney's 
health  had  been  impaired  tor  some  time,  he  always  manifested  a  rare  mental  vigor, 
abundantly  evidenced  in  his  business  activities  and  in  the  depth  of  thought  given  to 
religious,  civic  and  other  subjects.  He  was  exceptionally  fond  of  literature,  art  and 
music,  the  study  of  astrono:ny,  birds  and  animals.  He  was  considered  an  authority 
on  flower  and  tree  culture,  and  from  many  different  sections  of  the  land  he  brought  to 
his  city  home  and  his  country  place  rare  plants,  shrubs  and  flowers.  We  quote  from  a 
letter  received  by  Mrs.  Dabney,  at  the  time  of  her  husband's  death:  'I  believe  that  it  is 
Edwin  Markham  who  has  said, 

'Gone  is  the  city,  gone  the  day, 

Yet  still  the  Story  and  the  meaning  stay.' 

These  few  words  seem  to  express  to  me  so  clearly  that  although  the  physical  of  Mr. 
Dabney  and  the  day  of  his  death  have  passed,  yet  he  still  remains  with  us,  a  guiding 
light  for  a  noble,  clean-lived  life,  a  life  that  his  friends  are  honored  by  having  known, 
either  in  the  family  circle  or  in  business." 


WAYNE  ERIK  MAUNULA. 


Wayne  Erik  Maunula  is  one  of  the  respected  and  influential  citizens  of  Astoria, 
Clatsop  county,  Oregon,  where  he  is  successfully  engaged  in  the  automobile  business. 
He  is  a  native  of  Washington  state,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Deep  River  In  1892, 
a  son  of  Erik  and  Elizabeth  Maunula.  In  1915  the  father  died,  leaving  a  considerable 
estate,  of  which  Wayne  E.  is  the  manager.  Erik  Maunula  was  a  progressive  and  success- 
ful man  and  gained  the  respect  and  high  regard  of  all  with  whom  he  came  into  contact. 
He  was  born  in  the  northwest  of  Finland  on  the  3d  of  December,  1851,  a  son  of  Andrew 
Maunula,  also  a  native  of  Finland,  who  at  the  age  of  twenty-six  years  became  the  head 
of  the  grand  jury,  which  position  he  held  until  his  death,  after  passing  his  sixtieth 
birthday.  The  office  held  by  Andrew  Maunula  is  equivalent  to  that  of  judge  in  our  own 
country.  Erik  Maunula  and  his  brother  Emanuel  were  the  only  members  of  this  family 
to  come  to  the  United  States.  In  1872  Erik  Maunula  came  to  this  country  and  in  1876 
removed  to  the  Pacific  coast,  locating  in  Astoria.  There  he  became  interested  in  the 
Occident  Cannery  and  was  later  manager  and  agent  for  the  Columbia  River  Packers 
Association.  He  possessed  considerable  inventive  genius  and  his  ability  in  this  direction 
resulted  in  his  securing  eight  United  States  patents  on  canning  devices.  He  also  in- 
vented machinery  for  casting  the  sinkers  on  a  lead  line  tor  nets  and  considered  that 
his  best  patent.  In  1SS4  Erik  Maunula  was  married  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Karhu  Kohti, 
a  native  of  Finland  who  came  to  the  United  States  in  18S0  and  they  were  parents  of 
six  children:  Ina,  the  wife  of  John  Kinkela;  Lina;  Wayne  Erik,  the  subject  of  this 
review;  Osmo;  Otto;  and  Ernest. 

Wayne  E.  Maunula  received  his  education  in  the  grade  schools  and  the  high  school 
of  Astoria  and  in  due  time  entered  the  Oregon  Agricultural  College,  taking  up  an  en- 
gineering course.  After  leaving  college  he  became  associated  with  the  Columbia  River 
Packing  Company  and  the  Occident  Packing  Company,  in  which  lines  of  work  he  was 
very  successful.  In  1917  he  enlisted  for  service  in  the  World  war.  At  this  time  he 
had  just  commenced  business  on  his  own  account  as  an  automobile  agent,  but  closing 
his  office  he  went  into  training  at  Camp  Lewis  and  was  soon  afterwards  sent  overseas 
as  a  member  of  the  famous  Ninety-first  Division,  being  attached  to  the  Three  Hundred 
and  Sixteenth  Field  Signal  Detachment.  In  June,  1918,  the  command  was  ordered  to 
sail  and  after  being  stationed  in  various  parts  of  England  they  arrived  in  France  on 
the  26th  of  July,  191S.  From  that  date  until  the  middle  of  August  he  was  in  training 
in  open  warfare  near  Chaumont,  France.  He  was  then  transferred  to  the  Three  Hun- 
dred and  Sixty-fourth  Infantry  as  signal  man  and  from  that  time  was  in  continuous 
action  on  the  front.  He  participated  in  the  battle  of  the  Argonne,  going  over  the  top 
on  the  26th  of  September  and  until  October  4th  was  in  the  thick  of  the  fight.  On  that 
date  the  command  was  so  exhausted  that  it  was  sent  to  the  rear,  but  five  days  later  was 
shipped  to  Belgium,  arriving  at  Ypres  on  the  23d  of  October,  having  had  but  two  days 
of  rest.  The  men  at  once  marched  to  the  front  to  relieve  the  French  and  after  strenuous 
service  from   October   29th   to  November   4th   they   were   again   relieved   but   only   for  a 


134  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

short  time.  They  returned  to  the  fight  November  6th,  remaining  in  active  service  until 
November  11th,  the  date  of  the  signing  of  the  armistice.  Mr.  Maunula  was  then  ordered 
to  follow  the  German  retreat  and  he  spent  Thanksgiving  day  at  Sottegem  in  Belgium. 
From  Belgium  the  Ninety-first  Division  was  ordered  to  the  American  base  of  supplies 
at  Le  Mans  and  January  1,  1919,  found  him  at  Le  Ferte  Bernard,  where  the  command 
remained  until  March  and  then  entrained  for  St.  Xazaire,  from  which  place  they  sailed 
for  America.  Arriving  in  the  United  States  on  the  16th  of  April  they  first  went  to 
Camp  Mills,  Long  Island,  thence  to  Camp  Lewis,  Washington,  where  they  were  demobil- 
ized on  the  1st  of  May,  1919.  Through  his  entire  period  of  service  Mr.  Maunula  served 
gallantly  and  as  a  reward  for  his  bravery  on  the  field  in  the  Ypres-Lys  offensive  he 
received  a  citation.  Following  his  discharge  he  returned  to  his  home  in  Astoria  and 
resumed  his  auto  business,  which  had  remained  at  a  standstill  during  his  twenty 
months'  service  in  France.  On  the  1st  of  June.  1920,  the  Maunula  Auto  Company  secured 
extensive  show  rooms  on  the  corner  of  Thirteenth  and  Duane  streets,  where  they  are 
handling  the  Overland,  Willys-Knight  and  Hupmobile  cars  and  the  G.  M.  C.  trucks,  also 
a  full  line  of  accessories.  The  old  quarters  of  the  company  at  Twenty-ninth  and  Frank- 
lin are  used  as  a  repair  shop. 

On  the  2Sth  of  August,  1920,  Mr.  Maunula  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mildred 
Pauline  Peterson,  a  daughter  of  0.  D.  Peterson,  one  of  the  best  known  farmers  of  southern 
Washington.  Mrs.  Maunula  is  a  charming  hostess  and  is  a  leader  in  the  social  circles 
of  Astoria. 

Politically  Mr.  Maunula  is  a  supporter  of  the  republican  party,  in  the  interests  of 
which  he  takes  an  active  part,  although  he  is  not  a  politician  in  any  sense  of  the  word. 
He  has  no  fraternal  affiliations  but  is  a  consistent  member  of  the  Lutheran  church.  He 
is  accounted  one  of  the  most  reliable  young  business  men  of  the  city  and  a  brilliant 
future  is  assured  him. 


CHARLES  A.  HAINES. 


Charles  A.  Haines,  deceased,  was  one  of  the  prominent  business  men  of  Burns 
and  Narrows,  where  tor  many  years  he  was  identified  with  the  cities  as  a  representative 
of  various  important  business  interests.  No  man  was  ever  more  respected  and  no 
man  ever  more  fully  enjoyed  the  confidence  of  the  people  or  more  richly  deserved  the 
esteem  in  which  he  was  held.  In  his  lifetime  his  many  friends  throughout  Central 
Oregon,  recognizing  his  merit,  rejoiced  in  his  advancement  and  in  the  honors  to  which 
he  attained,  and  since  his  death  they  have  cherished  his  memory,  which  remains  as  a 
blessed  benediction  to  all  who  knew  him.  Honorable  in  business,  loyal  in  citizenship, 
charitable  in  thought,  kindly  in  action,  true  to  every  trust  confided  to  his  care,  his 
life  was  the  highest  type  of  Christian  manhood. 

Charles  A.  Haines  was  born  in  Indiana  in  1870,  a  son  of  John  A.  and  Eliza  W. 
(Jennings)  Haines.  He  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  state 
and  came  to  Oregon  in  1892.  He  made  his  initial  step  into  the  business  world  as  a 
clerk  in  his  brother's  store  in  Harney  county  and  at  an  early  date  evinced  marked 
business  ability.  He  soon  started  into  business  on  his  own  account,  erecting  a  build- 
ing at  the  Narrows,  and  by  his  innate  ability,  backed  by  strict  integrity,  built  up  the 
most  successful  trade  in  that  section  of  the  state.  Within  a  short  period  Mr.  Haines 
rose  to  a  position  of  prominence  in  the  community  and  did  much  to  develop  and  im- 
prove the  general  welfare.  For  some  years  he  occupied  the  offices  of  justice  of  the 
peace  and  postmaster  and  holding  that  every  public  office  was  a  public  trust  he  carried 
out  the  duties  of  those  offices  to  the  best  of  his  ability.  In  financial  circles  he  was  a 
well  known  figure  as  vice  president  of  the  First  National  Bank  at  Burns,  and  he 
founded  the  telephone  company  at  the  Narrows.  His  astuteness  in  business  was  con- 
sidered marvelous  and  at  the  time  of  his  death  in  1916,  he  had  acquired  a  fortune  of  three 
hundred  thousand  dollars,  which  he  bequeathed  to  his  widow  and  children.  That  fortune 
he  had  accumulated  in  less  than  a  quarter  of  a  century  and  it  was  the  result  of  self- 
deprivation,  sacrifice  and  unceasing  toil. 

In  1896  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Haines  to  Miss  Annie  Comegys,  a  daughter 
of  Nimrod  and  Siralda  Comegys.  whose  parents  were  of  old  Wisconsin  pioneer  stock, 
having  lived  originally  in  Virginia.  Three  children  were  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Haines: 
Hazel,  Wilbur  and  Marie.  Hazel  is  now  the  wife  of  J.  D.  Leonard,  who  is  a  student 
in  the  medical  department  of  the  University  of  Oregon.     Mr.  Leonard  was  a  volunteer 


CHARLES   A.   HAINES 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  137 

in  the  World  war,  serving  in  France  as  a  member  of  the  coast  artillery.  He  was 
honorably  discharged  on  the  11th  of  March,  1919,  as  sergeant  in  the  medical  corps; 
Wilbur,  who  is  a  graduate  of  the  Hills  Military  College,  is  now  manager  of  his  mother's 
six  thousand  acre  ranch  in  Diamond  valley.  He  married  Miss  Mary  Jenkins,  a 
daughter  of  J.  R.  Jenkins,  a  well  known  sheep  man;  the  youngest  member  of  the 
family,  Marie,  is  a  student  at  St.  Helen's  Hall,  Portland,  where  her  sister  was  graduated. 
Mrs.  Haines  is  a  woman  of  much  ability  and  a  model  mother.  Her  large  holdings  are 
being  carefully  conserved  for  her  children. 

Mr.  Haines  was  prominent  in  the  Masonic  circles  of  the  state.  He  had  attained 
the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Scottish  Rite  and  was  a  Noble  of  the  Mystic  Shrine. 
He  was  one  of  the  public-spirited  men  of  Burns,  always  ready  to  give  his  assistance 
in  promoting  every  movement  that  meant  the  betterment  of  local  conditions  or  the 
advancement  of  community  interests.  Because  of  a  well  balanced  mind  and  a  sterling 
character  he  was  able  to  see  the  silver  lining  to  many  a  cloud  that  to  others  would  have 
looked  hopelessly  black,  and  he  overcame  obstacles  which  to  many  would  have  seemed 
insurmountable. 


EPHRAIM  CRANSTON. 


Y 


Macaulay  has  said  that  little  can  be  expected  of  a  man  who  does  not  feel  justifiable 
pride  in  the  record  of  an  honorable  and  honored  ancestry.  Ephraim  Cranston,  of  Waldo 
Hills,  Oregon,  was  a  man  who  came  of  a  distinguished  line  and  his  own  course  of  life 
was  in  harmony  with  that  of  the  family  record.  The  genealogical  line  of  the  Cranston 
family  which  is  of  Scotch-English  descent,  could  be  traced  back  to  eleven  crowned  heads 
of  Europe.  The  founder  of  the  family  in  the  new  world  was  John  Cranston  who  be- 
came a  resident  of  Rhode  Island  a  few  years  after  the  Mayflower  reached  the  Plymouth 
coast.  John  Cranston  served  as  the  first  governor  of  the  Rhode  Island  colony  under 
the  English  crown,  was  also  attorney  general  and  held  high  military  offices.  He  served  as 
chief  executive  of  the  colony  for  two  years  and  was  then  succeeded  by  his  son,  Samuel 
Cranston,  who  in  1698  was  elected  governor  of  Rhode  Island  and  was  continued  in  the 
office  by  consecutive  elections  through  twenty-nine  years,  his  death  occurring  while  he  was 
still  serving  as  chief  executive.  No  other  governor  of  Rhode  Island  has  ever  been 
honored  with  an  equally  long  term  and  it  is  said:  "He  also  held  the  highest  military 
oflSee  of  the  state  and  owed  a  large  part  of  his  popularity  to  his  courage  and  able  leader- 
ship of  the  state's  armies." 

Ephraim  Cranston  was  born  in  Rhode  Island,  December  15,  1800,  and  was  quite 
young  when  his  parents  became  residents  of  Ohio,  where  he  was  reared.  After  reaching 
man's  estate  he  wedded  Roxanna  Sears,  a  native  of  New  Bedford,  Massachusetts.  Her 
mother  was  a  representative  of  one  of  the  oldest  and  wealthiest  families  of  Boston  and 
after  her  marriage  to  a  Mr.  Quishman  removed  to  Ohio,  being  numbered  among  the 
pioneers  of  that  state.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Cranston  began  their  domestic  life  on  a  large 
farm  which  he  owned  and  afterward  brought  under  a  high  state  of  cultivation.  In 
1850  he  disposed  of  his  extensive  agricultural  interests  in  Ohio  and  largely  invested 
his  money  in  fine  heifers  which  he  started  to  drive  across  the  plains  to  Oregon.  On  the 
long  trip,  however,  he  lost  many  but  still  had  enough  left  to  make  a  fine  herd  on  reach- 
ing this  state.  When  the  family  were  en  route  reports  reached  them  concerning  various 
Indian  massacres  and  also  the  fact  that  western  emigrants  were  falling  victims  to  the 
cholera,  so  that  they  spent  the  winter  in  Missouri  and  did  not  reach  Oregon  until 
October,  1851.  They  traveled  westward  with  a  train  of  sixty  wagons,  Mr.  Cranston 
acting  as  captain  of  the  party  and  to  him  all  the  others  looked  to  extricate  them  from 
any  difficulties  or  dangers  which  they  encountered.  He  was  a  very  forceful  and  re- 
sourceful man,  possessed  of  undaunted  courage  and  determination,  whom  the  Indians 
styled  "Oley  Man  Wagon  Doctor." 

After  reaching  the  northwest  Mr.  Cranston  settled  on  a  farm  in  the  Waldo  Hills 
country  and  began  raising  cattle  and  other  stock  about  ten  miles  from  Salem.  His 
diligence  and  enterprise  brought  substantial  results  and  he  soon  became  recognized  as 
one  of  the  leading  farmers  and  stock  raisers  of  that  section  where  he  continued  to 
make  his  home  until  a  few  years  prior  to  his  death,  his  last  days  being  spent  in  Salem. 

Mr.  Cranston's  prosperity  was  to  him  a  source  of  great  pleasure,  inasmuch  as  it 
enabled  him  to  provide  liberally  for  his  family.  To  him  and  his  wife  were  born  nine 
children,  three  of  whom  passed   away   in   infancy  while   the  others  reached  adult   age. 


138  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

but  the  only  one  now  living  is  Mrs.  Arthur  H.  Breyman,  a  resident  of  Portland.  The 
eldest  was  Warren  Cranston  who  followed  farming  near  Salem  and  was  a  leading  resi- 
dent of  that  section  of  the  state,  being  called  upon  to  represent  his  district  in  the 
general  assembly;  the  second  son,  Samuel  B.  Cranston,  engaged  in  farming  in  early 
life  but  later  took  up  the  study  of  law  and  became  a  member  of  the  bar  of  Lake  county, 
Oregon;  Edward  P.  Cranston  was  interested  in  the  gold  mines  of  Baker  county,  Oregon; 
Elizabeth  became  the  wife  of  Quincy  Brooks;  and  William  Cranston  was  likewise  con- 
nected with  mining  interests  of  eastern  Washington  and  of  Oregon  but  passed  away  in 
Idaho.  The  family  circle  was  again  broken  by  the  hand  of  death  when  on  the  6th  of 
October,  1S73,  Ephraim  Cranston  passed  away  on  the  farm  of  his  son  Warren  near 
Salem.  His  widow  survived  him  for  about  nine  years,  her  death  occurring  in  Dayton. 
Washington.  September  5,  1882.  A  contemporary  biographer  has  said:  "They  were 
among  the  worthy  pioneer  people  of  the  state  and  Mr.  Cranston's  labors  constituted  an 
important  element  in  improving  the  grade  of  stock  raised  and  thus  promoting  the  agri- 
cultural development  and  prosperity  of  Oregon."  Mr.  Cranston  was  ever  a  close  student 
of  political  problems  and  issues  and  in  early  manhood  supported  the  whig  party,  while 
upon  its  dissolution  he  joined  the  ranks  of  the  republican  party.  He  always  strongly 
opposed  slavery  and  put  forth  every  effort  to  aid  the  negroes  who  were  attempting  to 
make  their  way  by  means  of  the  "underground  railroad"  in  hope  of  freedom  in  Canada. 
Both  he  and  his  wife  were  people  of  genuine  personal  worth,  highly  esteemed  by  all 
who  knew  them.  In  his  early  life  Mr.  Cranston  became  a  universalist  and  always 
adhered  to  the  doctrines  of  that  church.  In  his  latter  days  he  read  and  reread  the  Bible 
until  he  could  repeat  any  passage  for  which  you  might  ask.  Mr.  Cranston's  life  was  of 
significant  service  to  the  state  in  the  vigor  he  lent  to  the  pioneer  era  in  making  this 
region  habitable,  in  bringing  its  resources  to  light  and  in  stamping  his  intensely  practical 
ideas  upon  the  agricultural  development.  Such  careers  are  too  near  us  now  for  their 
significance  to  be  appraised  at  its  true  value;  but  the  future  will  be  able  to  trace  the 
tremendous  effect  of  the  labors  of  these  pioneers  upon  the  society  and  the  life  of  their 
time. 


MARK  ARLEY  CAMERON. 


Mark  Arley  Cameron,  engaged  in  the  sale  of  automobile  accessories  under  the  name 
of  the  Cameron  Motor  Company  in  Hood  River,  was  born  in  Illinois,  April  10,  1876, 
and  is  now  numbered  among  the  progressive  business  men  of  his  adopted  city.  His 
parents,  John  L.  and  Sarah  J.  (Snow)  Cameron,  were  representatives  of  pioneer  families 
from  Illinois.  In  1886,  when  their  son  Mark  was  but  ten  years  of  age.  they  started 
for  the  Pacific  coast  and  the  father  first  took  up  farming  near  Roseburg,  Oregon,  but 
after  a  brief  period  death  ended  his  labors  and  the  mother  later  returned  with  her 
little  family  to  Hood  River. 

Mark  A.  Cameron  attended  school  in  Illinois  and  continued  his  education  as  a  pupil 
in  the  public  schools  of  Roseburg  and  of  Hood  River,  Oregon.  He  began  earning  his 
living  as  an  employe  in  a  sawmill  when  quite  young  and  after  a  service  of  more  than 
a  decade,  in  which  he  thoroughly  familiarized  himself  with  every  principle  and  detail 
of  the  business,  he  established  a  sawmill  of  his  own  and  later  opened  a  box  factory  at 
Odell.  in  the  conduct  of  which  he  was  afterward  associated  with  George  Sheppard.  In 
1916  he  abandoned  the  sawmill  and  box  factory  to  establish  a  large  garage  in  Hood 
River,  erecting  the  building  in  company  with  two  partners.  They  operated  the  garage 
until  1920,  at  which  time  Mr.  Cameron  sold  his  business  and  purchased  an  accessories 
store.  This  he  has  since  conducted  with  success  under  the  name  of  the  Cameron  Motor 
Company.  His  business  is  located  at  First  and  Oak  streets  and  he  carries  a  complete 
stock  of  automobile  accessories  and  tires  and  also  acts  as  agent  for  the  Studebaker  cars, 
the  Maxwell  and  the  White  trucks.  His  business  has  assumed  substantial  proportions 
and  ranks  him  with  the  prominent  representatives  of  automobile  interests  in  this  section. 

Mr.  Cameron  was  married  in  1900  to  Miss  Belle  Day  of  Cascade  Locks,  Oregon,  and 
they  have  one  child,  Vergil  Leroy,  a  junior  in  the  University  of  Oregon. 

In  1918  Mr.  Cameron  was  elected  to  the  city  council  of  Hood  River  to  serve  for  a 
four  years'  term  and  is  now  chairman  of  the  committee  on  streets  and  a  member  of 
the  committee  on  police  and  finance.  He  is  progressive  in  every  sense  of  the  term  and 
takes  up  his  public  duties  with  the  same  thoroughness  and  zeal  which  he  has  displayed 
in  the  conduct  of  his  private  business  affairs.     He  was  foremost  in  his  advocacy  of  the 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  139 

issuance  of  bonds  to  build  the  new  city  liall,  is  a  supporter  of  the  new  automobile  park 
and  of  every  measure  tending  to  the  advancement  and  improvement  of  Hood  River. 
He  was  one  of  the  leaders  in  the  purchase  of  the  thousand  gallons  a  minute  compound 
chemical  and  water  pumps  for  the  fire  department  and  was  equally  active  in  support  of 
the  new  city  lighting  by  the  Holaphane  light  system,  a  valuable  city  improvement.  He 
is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  in  which  he  has  filled  all  of  the 
chairs  in  the  local  lodge,  and  is  likewise  connected  with  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order 
of  Elks.  He  exercises  much  influence  in  political,  business  and  social  circles  and  is  most 
widely  and  favorably  known. 


RICHARD  LEA  BARNES. 


Richard  Lea  Barnes  has  long  been  identified  with  banking  interests  in  Portland 
and  is  still  a  representative  of  the  directorate  of  the  United  States  National  Bank  of 
which  for  a  number  of  years  he  was  the  vice  president.  He  comes  of  ancestry  dis- 
tinctively English  in  its  lineal  and  collateral  lines  and  was  born  at  Berbice,  Demerara, 
British  Guiana,  on  the  31st  of  July,  1857.  His  ancestral  line  can  be  traced  back  to  the 
reign  of  King  Edward  III  in  the  middle  of  the  fourteenth  century.  His  parents  at  the 
time  of  his  birth  were  residing  temporarily  in  South  America  and  following  their  return 
to  England  he  became  a  student  in  Cheltenham  College,  from  which  he  was  graduated 
upon  the  completion  of  his  course  of  study. 

Early  in  his  business  career  Mr.  Barnes  became  identified  with  banking  and 
thoroughly  acquainted  himself  with  every  phase  of  the  business,  realizing  that  eflSciency 
and  fidelity  meant  advancement.  Step  by  step  he  worked  his  way  upward  until  there 
came  to  him  a  comprehensive  knowledge  of  banking  in  every  phase.  He  made  the 
business  his  life  work  and  after  five  years'  experience  along  that  line  in  London  he 
sought  the  opportunities  of  the  new  world,  removing  to  San  Francisco,  where  he  was 
active  in  banking  circles  for  a  similar  period.  He  likewise  spent  five  years  in  banks 
in  British  Columbia  and  for  an  equal  length  of  time  was  identified  with  the  banking 
interests  of  Seattle,  after  which  he  removed  to  Portland  where  he  took  up  his  abode 
more  than  two  decades  ago.  While  residing  in  British  Columbia  he  was  a  representa- 
tive of  the  Bank  of  British  Columbia,  formerly  the  Wells  Fargo  Bank,  also  of  the  United 
States  National  Bank  and  the  Colonial  Bank  of  the  West  Indies.  After  coming  to 
Portland  he  was  elected  to  the  vice  presidency  of  the  United  States  National  Bank  of  this 
city  and  still  remains  a  member  of  its  board  of  directors.  For  a  considerable  period 
he  gave  his  attention  to  the  development  of  the  business  of  the  bank  and  as  one  of  its 
executives  bent  his  efforts  to  administrative  direction  and  executive  control.  He  ever 
recognized  the  fact  that  the  bank  which  most  carefully  safeguards  the  interests  of  its 
depositors  is  the  one  most  worthy  of  public  trust  and  confidence  and  he  did  much  to 
install  a  policy  that  was  above  reproach  or  question. 

In  1898  Mr.  Barnes  was  united  in  marriage  to  Mrs.  Kenneth  Macleay  and  to  them 
was  born  one  son,  Richard,  who  is  now  employed  in  the  office  of  the  Portland  Flour 
Mills. 

Mr.  Barnes  is  a  communicant  of  the  Episcopal  church  and  is  identified  with  all 
of  the  leading  social  clubs  of  Portland.  He  is  a  popular  man,  social  and  genial,  and  one 
whose  salient  qualities  contributed  in  direct  measure  to  his  success  as  a  banker  and  to 
the  upbuilding  of  the  financial  institution  with  which  he  has  been  associated  throughout 
the  period  of  his  residence  in  Portland. 


SOL  J.  BAUM. 

Since  1917  Sol  J.  Baum  has  been  engaged  in  the  sporting  goods  business  in  Pendle- 
ton. His  business  has  grown  to  extensive  proportions  and  is  one  of  the  largest  of  its 
kind  in  the  county.  A  native  son  of  Oregon,  Sol  J.  Baum  was  born  at  Roseburg,  in 
September,  1882,  a  son  of  Edward  and  Rose  (Eben)  Baum,  both  natives  of  Austria. 
Edward  Baum  came  to  the  United  States  in  1871,  at  the  age  of  twenty-one  years,  while 
his  wife  came  to  this  country  in  186.5,  when  but  sixteen  years  of  age.  Their  marriage 
was  celebrated  in  Portland.  Oregon,  on  the  21st  of  March,  1878.  On  arriving  in  the 
United   States   Edward   Baum   immediately   came   west   and   settled   in   Albany,   Oregon, 


140  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

where  for  three  years  he  clerked  for  his  brother,  Nathan,  in  a  general  store.  At  the 
termination  of  that  period  he  went  to  New  York,  where  he  remained  for  but  a  short 
time  and  then  returned  to  Albany,  Oregon,  and  engaged  in  the  cigar  business.  After 
selling  out  this  business  he  clerked  for  a  .Mr.  Marks  at  Roseburg,  Oregon,  being  there 
engaged  in  a  mercantile  establishment  for  three  years.  He  next  engaged  in  the  general 
merchandise  business  at  Eugene,  Oregon,  and  for  sixteen  years  conducted  his  store, 
achieving  a  gratifying  amount  of  success.  In  1S96  he  came  to  Pendleton  and  has  since 
that  time  successfully  conducted  a  cigar  and  stationery  business.  He  is  now  seventy- 
two  years  of  age  and  in  the  best  of  health.  Edward  Baum  has  always  given  his  support 
to  the  republican  party  and  his  fraternal  afflliations  are  with  the  Masons  and  the  Ancient 
Order  of  United  Workmen.  Mrs.  Baum  is  living  and  she  and  her  husband  are  highly 
respected  citizens  of  the  community  in  which  they  make  their  home. 

Sol  J.  Baum  is  indebted  to  the  schools  of  Eugene,  Oregon,  for  his  education.  In 
1S9S  he  started  into  the  business  world  as  clerk  for  the  Max  Baer  stationery  store  at 
Pendleton  and  then  worked  in  the  same  capacity  for  a  Mr.  Alexander,  the  owner  of  a 
clothing  establishment.  The  following  seven  years  he  spent  on  the  road  for  the  Weil 
Haskett  Company,  selling  ladies'  ready-to-wear  clothing  and  in  1910  he  engaged  in  the 
stationery  business  at  No.  1,  West  Forty-second  street.  New  York,  which  business  he 
successfully  operated  for  a  period  of  three  years.  At  the  termination  of  that  time  he 
returned  to  Pendleton  for  a  short  time  and  then  again  went  east.  He  was  engaged 
in  the  jewelry  business  at  Troy,  New  York,  Newport,  Rhode  Island,  and  also  had  a 
branch  store  at  Narragansett  Pier.  In  the  fall  of  1913  he  came  west  once  more,  and 
settling  in  Pendleton  engaged  in  jewelry  and  novelties  until  1917,  at  which  time  he 
entered  the  sporting  goods  business,  enlarging  the  store  of  his  father  and  occupying  a 
part  of  it.  Mr.  Baum  is  an  enthusiastic  sportsman  and  he  throws  himself  into  the 
sale  of  his  sporting  goods  with  the  energy  of  the  man  who  truly  loves  his  work. 

In  1912  while  in  Newport,  Rhode  Island,  Mr.  Baum  was  married  to  Miss  Margaret 
Herz,  daughter  of  Lazar  L.  Herz,  and  a  native  of  that  city. 

In  the  interests  of  the  fishing  and  hunting  activities  of  his  county  and  state  Mr. 
Baum  has  been  a  big  booster.  He  is  at  present  interested  with  other  men  in  the  build- 
ing of  a  fine  hunters'  cabin  in  the  Sugar  Bowl  country,  this  cabin  to  be  used  as  the 
basis  of  activities  when  the  hunting  and  fishing  season  is  in  tuU  swing.  In  all  of  his 
various  undertakings  Mr.  Baum  has  achieved  a  substantial  amount  of  success  and  he 
is  considered  one  of  the  prominent  and  useful  citizens  of  Pendleton. 


BENJAMIN  FRANKLIN  WALLING,  JR. 

Benjamin  Franklin  Walling,  Jr.,  a  representative  of  one  of  Oregon's  honored  pio- 
neer families,  is  numbered  among  the  successful  young  business  men  of  Portland  where 
he  is  now  engaged  in  dealing  in  investment  securities,  with  offices  in  the  Lewis  build- 
ing. He  is  a  typical  western  man,  wide-awake,  alert  and  enterprising  and  at  all  points 
in  his  career  has  been  actuated  by  a  progressive  spirit  and  firm  determination  that  has 
enabled  him  to  overcome  all  obstacles  and  difficulties  in  his  path  and  press  steadily  for- 
ward to  the  goal  of  success.  He  has  been  instrumental  in  the  promotion  of  large 
irrigation  projects  and  other  public  utilities  and  through  his  activities  has  contributed 
in   substantial   measure   to  the  development  and  upbuilding   of  the   northwest. 

Mr.  Walling  is  one  of  Oregon's  native  sons.  He  was  born  at  Hood  River,  July  4, 
1S84,  of  the  marriage  of  Benjamin  F.  Walling.  Sr.,  and  Georgia  M.  (Comley)  Walling, 
the  former  born  in  Spring  Valley,  Polk  county,  Oregon.  November  24,  1848,  while  the 
latter's  birth  occurred  near  Albany,  in  Benton  county,  this  state.  February  7,  1854. 
The  paternal  grandfather,  Jesse  D.  Walling,  was  born  in  Ohio,  April  1,  1S16,  and  in 
1836  he  became  a  resident  of  Illinois.  On  the  1st  of  December,  1839.  he  wedded  Miss 
Eliza  A.  Wise,  of  New  York,  and  in  1847  they  crossed  the  plains  to  Oregon  as  members 
of  a  company  led  by  Captain  Davidson,  reaching  Spring  Valley,  Polk  county,  on  Christ- 
mas day  of  that  year.  There  the  grandfather  followed  farming  for  two  years  and  in 
1849  he  went  to  California  in  search  of  gold  and  engaged  in  mining  in  that  state  until 
1851.  Upon  his  return  to  Oregon  he  established  the  town  of  Lincoln,  in  Polk  county, 
where  he  built  the  first  docks,  stores  and  flouring  mill,  also  becoming  a  pioneer  in  the 
steamboat  business  on  the  Willamette  and  Columbia  rivers,  being  owner  of  the  Peoples 
Transportation  Company,  his  labors  constituting  an  important  element  in  the 
development  and   upbuilding  of  the  state.     Mr.  Walling  also  outfitted  the  rescue  party 


I 


BENJAMIN  F.  WALLING,  Jr. 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  143 

which  went  to  the  assistance  of  the  William  Dierdor£f  company  which  was  stranded 
in  the  Cascade  mountains  while  en  route  to  Oregon  City  in  the  fall  of  1854. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Walling  reared  a  family  of  fourteen  children.  He  passed  away  May  9, 
1S70,  at  the  age  of  fifty-four  years,  one  month  and  nine  days,  his  death  being  due  to  a 
runaway  accident  caused  by  a  pet  horse  of  the  family.  His  wife's  demise  occurred 
at  Portland  on  the  10th  of  January,  1S93,  at  which  time  she  was  seventy-one  years  of 
age.  J.  B.  Comley,  the  grandfather  on  the  maternal  side,  was  born  in  Lancaster,  Ken- 
tucky, September  21,  1S27,  and  at  Natchez,  Mississippi,  he  married  Dorinda  McFadden, 
who  was  a  native  of  Louisiana,  born  November  20,  1S30.  In  1853  they  crossed  the  plains 
from  St.  Joseph,  Missouri,  in  an  emigrant  train  under  command  of  Dr.  0.  P.  Hill,  set- 
tling in  that  year  in  Benton  county,  Oregon.  While  journeying  near  the  Platte  river 
a  member  of  the  party  named  Babb,  who  was  riding  a  white  mule,  accidentally  killed 
a  squaw  and  fearing  the  revenge  of  the  Indians  they  colored  the  mule  black  with  the 
assistance  of  Drs.  O.  P.  and  R.  C.  Hill,  building  a  false  bottom  in  the  wagon,  in  which 
they  concealed  Babb.  For  many  days  the  Indians  followed  the  train  in  quest  of  Babb 
but  finally  abandoned  the  search  without  molesting  the  party.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Comley 
were  born  three  children,  of  whom  Georgia  M.  was  the  only  daughter.  At  Albany, 
Oregon,  on  the  6th  of  November,  1S72,  she  was  united  in  marriage  to  Benjamin  P.  Wall- 
ing, Sr.,  and  subsequently  they  removed  to  California,  after  which  they  returned  to 
Oregon,  taking  up  their  residence  in  Hood  River  in  November,  1875,  the  father  there 
engaging  in  the  hotel  business  until  1886.  In  that  year  he  went  to  Nampa,  Idaho, 
arriving  there  just  as  the  town  was  being  platted.  He  purchased  fifty-three  lots  and 
also  took  a  relinquishment  claim  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  a  short  distance  north 
of  the  town  and  became  active  in  real  estate  circles  there,  being  the  pioneer  in  that 
line  of  endeavor  in  that  locality.  He  was  long  connected  with  the  business  life  of  the 
city,  his  efforts  proving  a  potent  force  in  its  development  and  improvement  and  he 
there  continued  to  reside  until  1915,  when  he  retired  from  active  business  pursuits 
and  removed  to  Portland.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  B.  F.  Walling,  Sr.,  were  born  four  chil- 
dren: Dora  M.,  now  deceased,  who  became  the  wife  of  D.  A.  Baxter  who  served  for 
many  years  as  superintendent  of  schools  at  Nampa,  Idaho;  Frankie  G..  living  at  La 
Grande,  Oregon:  Benjamin  F.,  Jr.,  of  this  review;  and  Jesse  J.,  a  prominent  real  estate 
dealer  of  Nampa.  Idaho. 

In  the  public  schools  of  Nampa  and  Boise.  Idaho,  and  of  Portland,  Oregon,  Benjamin 
F.  Walling,  Jr.,  pursued  his  education  and  when  a  young  man  of  twenty-one  years  he 
engaged  in  mining  in  the  Silver  City  district  of  Idaho,  successfully  continuing  his 
operations  along  that  line  until  1907.  In  1909  he  became  interested  in  irrigation,  pump- 
ing water  onto  the  lowlands  along  the  Snake  river.  People  at  that  time  were  very 
skeptical  regarding  the  project,  which,  however,  later  became  a  great  success.  Sub- 
sequently Mr.  Walling  went  to  Salt  Lake  and  became  identified  with  the  Beaver  irriga- 
tion project  in  Beaver  county,  Utah,  the  scene  of  his  operations  being  two  hundred 
and  six  miles  south  of  Salt  Lake  City.  He  was  engaged  in  that  work  for  two  years 
and  the  venture  also  proved  a  most  successful  one.  He  afterwards  engaged  in  the 
bond  business  in  Chicago,  Illinois,  and  in  Boise,  Idaho,  raising  eleven  hundred  thou- 
sand dollars  in  Chicago  and  St.  Paul,  when  but  twenty-five  years  old,  for  the  purpose 
of  financing  the  Beaver  irrigation  project.  Subsequently  he  engaged  in  the  bond  busi- 
ness in  Seattle  but  not  finding  the  work  congenial  he  turned  his  attention  to  coal 
mining.  While  residing  in  Washington  he  became  interested  in  a  project  promoted  by 
two  banks  of  that  state,  one  located  at  Seattle  and  the  other  at  Centralia,  for  generating 
electric  power  from  coal  mines  to  supply  the  cities  of  Centralia  and  Chehalis,  Washing- 
ton, but  both  institutions  became  insolvent  and  Mr.  Walling  lost  considerable  money 
in  the  venture.  However,  he  subsequently  retrieved  this  loss,  returning  to  Centralia 
where  he  installed  a  two  thousand  horse  power  generating  plant  which  is  still  in  opera- 
tion. Later  with  an  associate  he  took  over  the  Maxwell  Land  &  Irrigation  Company 
at  Hermiston,  Oregon,  and  carried  that  project  through  to  successful  completion.  He 
was  also  the  organizer  of  the  Sherman  County  Light  &  Power  Company  and  in  associa- 
tion with  another  formed  the  Washington-Idaho  Water,  Power  &  Light  Company,  which 
serves  Lewiston,  Idaho,  and  vicinity  and  also  towns  in  southwestern  Washington,  his 
activities  thus  proving  a  most  important  element  in  the  development  of  various  sections 
of  the  northwest.  Subsequently  he  disposed  of  his  interests  in  these  various  companies 
and  removed  to  Portland,  Oregon,  where  he  is  now  residing,  dealing  in  investment 
securities.  His  initiative  spirit,  resourcefulness  and  splendid  executive  ability  have 
led  him  into  important  relations  and  his  connection  with  any  undertaking  insures  a 
prosperous   outcome   of   the   same,   for   whatever   he   undertakes   he   carries   forward    to 


144  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

successful  completion.  Although  at  times  he  has  encountered  discouragements  and 
difficulties  which  many  another  man  would  have  found  insurmountable  he  has  never 
lost  courage  but  has  steadily  advanced  until  success  has  crowned  his  efforts. 

On  the  ISth  of  March,  1908,  in  Caldwell,  Idaho,  Mr.  Walling  was  united  in  mar- 
riage to  Miss  Erma  B.  Hart,  a  daughter  of  James  B.  Hart,  a  resident  of  Salt  Lake 
City  who  crossed  the  plains  in  an  early  day,  becoming  a  pioneer  of  Utah.  The  only 
child  of  this  marriage  is  a  son,  Benjamin  Walling.  In  his  political  views  Mr.  Walling 
Is  a  stanch  republican,  interested  in  the  welfare  and  success  of  the  party  but  without 
aspirations  for  public  office,  preferring  to  devote  his  time  and  attention  to  the  manage- 
ment of  his  extensive  business  interests.  He  belongs  to  the  Masonic  lodge  and  in  his 
daily  life  exemplifies  the  beneficent  teachings  of  that  order.  The  name  of  Walling  has 
ever  been  an  honored  one  in  connection  with  the  pioneer  development  and  later  progress 
of  Oregon  and  Benjamin  F.  Walling,  Jr.,  is  actuated  by  the  spirit  of  advancement  and 
enterprise  which  dominated  his  forbears  and  which  has  been  a  most  effective  force  in 
the  upbuilding  of  the  northwest.  Although  still  a  young  man  he  has  accomplished 
much,  for  his  life  has  been  one  of  intense  activity,  intelligently  directed  into  those 
channels  through  which  flows  the  greatest  good  to  the  greatest  number  and  his  efforts 
have  brought  him  a  measure  of  success  that  is  most  desirable,  at  the  same  time  proving 
of  benefit  to  his  fellowmen  in  many  fields.  His  integrity  has  never  been  open  to  ques- 
tion and  his  many  sterling  qualities  of  character  have  gained  him  a  high  place  in  the 
respect  and  regard  of  all  who  have  been  brought  into  contact   with  him. 


ARTHUR  F.  MILLER. 

Arthur  P.  Miller,  president  of  the  Bank  of  Gresham.  was  born  at  Fort  Wayne,  In- 
diana, in  1843,  his  parents  being  Henry  and  Mary  Ann  Miller,  the  former  a  native  of 
Hanover,  Germany,  while  the  latter  was  born  in  Prussia.  Both  came  to  America  in 
early  life.  Henry  Miller  settled  on  a  farm  near  Fort  Wayne,  Indiana,  where  he  resided 
until  the  fall  of  1852,  and  then  removed  with  his  family  to  Savannah,  Missouri,  making 
the  journey  with  ox  teams  and  wagon  accompanied  by  his  wife,  one  son  and  six  daugh- 
ters. The  following  spring — about  the  21st  of  May,  1853 — they  started  for  Oregon,  mak- 
ing the  long  trip  across  the  stretches  of  hot  sand  and  over  the  mountains  with  a  wagon 
drawn  by  oxen.  Arthur  F.  Miller,  the  only  son,  was  then  a  lad  of  ten  years  and  drove 
one  of  the  teams  all  of  the  way.  The  family  arrived  at  Milwaukie  in  the  fall  of  that 
year  and  the  father  took  up  a  donation  claim  of  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres,  and  in 
the  fall  of  '59  he  bought  the  Henderson  Lewiling  claim,  now  the  Sellwood  golf  links, 
which  was  later  owned  by  the  son.  A,  F.  Miller  of  this  review.  This  he  cleared  and 
improved  and  made  the  development  of  a  large  orchard  one  of  the  features  of  his  place. 
He  was  one  of  the  pioneers  in  commercialized  fruit  growing  and  continued  to  engage 
in  active  horticultural  pursuits  until  about  1872,  when  he  .sold  the  property  and  bought 
two  blocks  at  Jefferson  and  Twentieth  afreets  in  Portland  where  he  spent  his  remain- 
ing days.  He  passed  away  in  1894,  while  his  wife  died  in  1893,  but  previous  to  her 
demise  they  had  visited  the  World's  Columbian  Exposition  in  Chicago,  air.  Miller  was 
keenly  interested  in  progress  and  improvement  along  many  lines  in  the  state  of  Oregon. 
He  was  particularly  helpful  in  relation  to  the  schools,  the  cause  of  public  education 
finding  in  him  a  stalwart  champion.  His  most  direct  and  valuable  contribution  to  the 
state's  development  was  along  the  line  of  horticultural  pursuits.  It  was  he  who  intro- 
duced the  Italian  prune  into  Oregon  and  for  a  long  period  he  successfully  followed  the 
nursery  business.  In  the  early  days  before  fruit  growing  was  introduced  to  any  extent 
into  the  northwest  he  sold  three  bushels  of  apples  for  one  hundred  and  two  dollars. 

Arthur  P.  Miller  acquired  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Milwaukie  and  was  the 
first  graduate  of  a  business  college  in  Portland  in  1867.  He  turned  his  attention  to 
horticultural  interests  and  the  nursery  business,  in  which  he  has  engaged  throughout 
his  entire  life.  For  several  years  he  was  associated  with  his  father  in  the  conduct  of 
a  nursery  and  later  was  the  owner  of  a  fine  forty-acre  orchard  of  mixed  fruit  and  berries. 
He  has  had  charge  of  forestry  and  argiculture  in  connection  with  the  state  and  for 
several  years  past  he  has  gathered  the  timber  of  Oregon  and  has  at  Washington,  D.  C, 
an  exhibit  of  Oregon  timber,  showing  a  larger  variety  than  that  of  any  other  state. 
For  eleven  years  he  also  gave  his  time  largely  to  the  collection  of  grain  and  various 
other  products  and  materials  tor  the  exhibits  of  the  Northern  Pacific  Railroad,  thus 
demonstrating  the  resourcefulness  of  the  state.     He  was  one  of  the  original  organizers 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  145 

of  fair  associations  throughout  Oregon  and  is  now  the  secretary  of  the  Portland  Fair. 
He  has  also  been  connected  with  banking  interests  and  at  the  present  writing  is  asso- 
ciated with  the  Bank  of  Gresham  of  which  he  is  the  president,  while  his  son,  Karl  A. 
Miller,  is  the  cashier.  The  resources  of  the  bank  indicated  sixty-two  thousand  dollars 
on  deposit  at  its  inception  and  in  1914  this  sum  had  been  increased  to  four  hundred  and 
twenty-two  thousand  dollars.  Mr.  Miller  has  been  a  member  of  the  Grange  for  forty- 
two  years  and  handles  the  insurance  in  the  organization.  He  is  also  a  director  of  the 
Lower  Columbia  Fire  Relief  Association  and  is  secretary  of  the  Patrons  Life  Insurance 
Association. 

In  1S6S  Mr.  Miller  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Jennie  R.  Stephenson  who  crossed 
the  plains  with  her  parents  in  1853,  the  family  settling  in  Washington.  To  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Miller  have  been  born  five  children,  three  of  whom  are  living:  Edwin  O.,  who 
is  connected  with  the  Southern  Pacific  Railroad  Company;  Karl,  who  is  cashier  of  the 
Bank  of  Gresham;  and  Ralph  W.,  a  resident  of  Oakland,  California. 

Mr.  Miller  is  a  republican  in  his  political  views,  yet  somewhat  liberal,  and  does 
not  consider  himself  bound  by  party  ties.  He  has  had  charge  of  elections  for  a  number 
of  years,  also  has  been  in  charge  of  school  elections  and  for  eighteen  years  served  as 
a  school  director.  He  has  been  prominently  identified  with  the  building  of  streets  and 
public  improvements,  laid  out  Miller's  addition  to  Portland,  and  his  home  is  situated 
at  the  end  of  Miller  avenue.  With  many  phases  of  public  progress  and  improvement 
he  has  thus  been  identified  and  the  worth  of  his  work  is  widely  acknowledged,  so  that 
he  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  valued  and  representative  residents  of  Oregon,  where  for 
more  than  two-thirds  of  a  century  he  has  made  his  home. 


WILLIAM  BRATTON   MUNFORD,   M.   D. 

No  man  has  done  more  for  the  building  up  and  general  welfare  of  the  town  of 
Banks,  Oregon,  and  that  section  of  Washington  county  in  which  Banks  is  located,  than 
Dr.  William  B.  Munford.  He  was  born  in  Cottonville,  Illinois,  in  1873.  His  father  was 
James  Renwick  Munford,  a  pioneer  farmer  of  the  state,  whose  Scotch-Irish  ancestor 
had  come  to  America  in  ISIO. 

William  B.  Munford  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Illinois,  and  when  his  father 
located  in  Kansas  he  matriculated  at  Washburn  Medical  College  at  Tokepa,  Kansas,  and 
in  1905  was  graduated  with  the  degree  of  Medical  Doctor.  He  first  took  up  practice 
In  Kansas,  but  on  account  of  his  health  came  to  Oregon  in  1907  and  in  1908  located 
at  Banks.  He  was  the  pioneer  physician  of  that  settlement  and  from  the  time  he  located 
there  was  a  potent  factor  in  the  growth  of  the  little  town,  both  professionally  and  other- 
wise. When  the  Commercial  Club  was  formed  Dr.  Munford  was  its  president,  and 
he  constructed  one  of  the  first  buildings  in  the  town,  where  he  opened  a  drug  store. 
His  reputation  as  a  physician  was  not  confined  to  the  vicinity  of  Banks,  but  soon  spread 
to  surrounding  sections  of  Washington  and  nearby  counties  and  with  the  late  Dr. 
Linklater  of  Hillsboro  he  controlled  the  practice  of  the  county.  There  was  no  enterprise 
looking  to  the  advancement  of  Banks  or  the  surrounding  county  but  found  in  him  an 
active  and  unselfish  helper.  Generous,  kindly  and  optimistic  to  a  degree  Dr.  Munford 
worked  hard  for  the  sick  in  his  professional  way  and  equally  hard  as  a  citizen  for  the 
progress  of  the  town.  The  result  of  this  activity  brought  about  the  undermining  of 
his  health  for  in  1918  he  developed  lung  trouble  and  with  his  devoted  wife  took  a 
trip  to  Colorado.  The  same  year  he  passed  away,  leaving  a  host  of  mourning  friends, 
the  city  of  Banks  having  lost  one  of  its  most  progressive  citizens  and  the  medical  pro- 
fession of  Oregon  one  of  its  brightest  members.  Dr.  Bailey,  Dr.  Linklater  and  Dr. 
Munford  have  all  passed  away  and  the  people  of  that  vicinity  feel  keenly  the  loss  of 
these  splendid  citizens. 

Dr.  Munford  was  married  at  Greeley,  Colorado,  in  1905,  to  Miss  Flora  A.  Mawhinney, 
a  native  of  Illinois,  who  was  born  in  Cottonville,  the  doctor's  own  birthplace.  She 
was  likewise  of  Scotch-Irish  ancestry  whose  forbears  were  pioneers  in  Illinois  and 
descendants  of  generations  of  progressive  Americans.  From  the  time  of  his  graduation 
she  was  his  helpmate  in  every  sense.  Dr.  Munford  left  his  wife  and  two  children, 
Charles  Wilbert,  now  a  student  of  the  high  school,  and  James  Kenneth,  a  pupil  of  the 
grade  school,  who  are  being  trained  by  their  devoted  mother  to  follow  in  the  footsteps 
of  their  distinguished  father.  Mrs.  Munford  is  an  active  member  of  the  Methodist 
church  and  is  the  corresponding  secretary  of  its  Sunday  school.     She  owns  a  fine  farm 

Vol.  111—10 


146  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

of  forty  acres  within  two  miles  of  Banks  and  also  a  town  residence  and  some  business 
property  on  the  main  street  of  the  city. 

Dr.  Munford  was  a  member  of  the  Washington  County  Medical  Society  and  the 
American  Medical  Association.  He  was  the  local  physician  of  the  Southern  Pacific 
Railway  and  the  Oregon  Electric  Railway.  The  people  of  Washington  county  will  long 
remember  Dr.  Munford  as  a  man  always  active  along  various  lines  that  have  been 
directly  beneficial  in  the  upbuilding  of  Banks  and  the  advancement  of  its  welfare. 


JOHN  A.  COLLIER. 


John  A.  Collier  dates  his  connection  with  tbe  Oregon  bar  from  May,  1901,  and  has 
practiced  in  Portland  continuously  since  1909.  He  was  born  in  Barren  county,  Kentucky, 
October  26,  1S74,  and  is  a  son  of  Pleasant  Pollard  and  Sarah  A.  (SuUinger)  Collier. 
The  father  was  born  in  the  Blue  Grass  state  in  1837  and  was  a  soldier  of  the  Civil  war, 
going  from  Kentucky  as  a  private  in  1861  and  serving  with  the  Union  army  for  three 
years.  In  days  of  peace  he  devoted  his  attention  to  farming  and  was  also  an  apiarist. 
While  in  Kentucky  he  married  Sarah  A.  SuUinger  and  his  death  occurred  in  1909, 
while  his  widow  survives  and  makes  her  home  in  Portland. 

John  A.  Collier  was  reared  on  a  farm  to  the  age  of  twenty  years  and  his  were 
the  usual  experiences  and  training  of  the  farm  bred  boy.  He  attended  the  country 
schools,  worked  in  the  fields  through  the  summer  months  and  for  two  years  pursued  a 
high  school  course.  Not  wishing  to  follow  agricultural  pursuits  as  a  life  work,  he  took 
up  the  study  of  law  in  1898  and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  May,  1901,  at  Pendleton, 
Oregon.  He  then  practiced  there  for  a  year  and  afterward  went  to  Fossil,  Oregon, 
where  he  followed  his  profession  for  six  years.  In  1909  he  opened  a  law  office  in  Port- 
land, where  he  has  since  remained,  and  as  the  years  have  passed  he  has  steadily  ad- 
vanced in  the  path  of  his  profession.  He  was  deputy  district  attorney  of  the  old  seventh 
judicial  district  of  Oregon  from  1903  until  1907  and  in  the  latter  year  was  appointed  by 
Governor  Chamberlain  district  attorney  for  the  eleventh  judicial  district,  occupying  that 
position  until  June,  190S.  From  the  1st  of  January,  1913,  until  October  1,  1918,  he 
was  deputy  district  attorney  for  the  fourth  judicial  district  and  has  since  concentrated 
his  efforts  and  energies  upon  an  extensive  and  increasingly  important  private  practice. 
He  is  also  a  director  of  the  Atterbury  Trust  Sales  Company. 

On  the  31st  of  December,  1901,  in  Pendleton,  Oregon,  Mr.  Collier  was  married  to 
Miss  Arta  B.  Huston  and  they  have  become  parents  of  a  son,  John  Russell,  who  was 
born  in  October,  1904.  Mr.  Collier  is  a  member  of  the  Press  Club.  Fraternally  he  is 
connected  with  the  Woodmen  of  the  World  and  his  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the 
republican  party.  He  has  exerted  considerable  influence  in  local  political  circles  and 
during  the  war  period  rendered  service  in  connection  with  the  questionnaires  and  the 
promotion  of  the  bond  drives. 


CHARLES  ALONZO  BELL. 


Every  commercial  traveler  of  the  west  knows  "Charley"  Bell,  the  genial  proprietor 
of  the  Mount  Hood  hotel  at  Hood  River  and  tourists  from  all  over  the  country  have 
a  kindly  remembrance  of  the  hospitality  received  and  the  interest  taken  in  their  trips 
around  the  Hood  River  valley  and  to  the  snowy  slopes  of  Mount  Hood,  while  the  people 
of  Hood  River  recognize  in  Mr.  Bell  the  creator  of  the  Mount  Hood  hotel,  which  has 
added  prestige  to  their  town  and  given  it  a  reputation  abroad.  It  is  a  recognized  cer- 
tainty that  when  any  enterprise  is  planned  to  further  the  interests  of  the  city  a  list  of 
its  supporters  will  contain  the  signature  of  Charles  A.  Bell,  for  at  all  times  he  is 
most  progressive  and  his  example  will  bring  to  any  movement  of  public  worth  a  large 
following. 

Mr.  Bell  was  born  in  New  Brunswick  in  1860,  his  parents  being  Henry  and  Jane 
(Norman)  Bell,  who  were  pioneer  residents  of  Canada,  in  which  country  the  son 
obtained  his  education.  In  early  life  he  turned  his  attention  to  the  timber  and  lumber 
business  and  after  coming  to  the  Pacific  coast  was  associated  with  the  Oregon  Lumber 
Company  for  many  years  in  Washington  and  in  Oregon.  In  1893  he  removed  to  Hood 
River   and   purchased   a   block   of   land   opposite   the   depot    of   the   Oregon   Railroad   & 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  147 

Navigation  Company  and  built  the  Mount  Hood  hotel.  Though  he  erected  a  large 
three-story  structure  it  soon  became  inadequate  to  the  needs  of  the  traveling  public  and 
in  1913  he  built  a  three-story  brick  annex  extending  through  to  Oak  street,  the  business 
thoroughfare,  the  annex  being  one  hundred  by  one  hundred  feet  in  dimensions.  The 
hotel  now  contains  one  hundred  and  fifty  rooms  and  is  thoroughly  modern  in  every 
department,  giving  to  the  public  the  highest  standards  of  hotel  service. 

In  1S89  Mr.  Bell  was  married  in  Pendleton,  Oregon,  to  Miss  Rosanna  E.  Young, 
also  a  native  of  New  Brunswick.  She  passed  away  In  1896,  leaving  a  son,  Frederick, 
who  is  now  assisting  his  father  in  the  conduct  and  management  of  the  hotel.  The  son 
is  a  veteran  of  the  World  war,  having  enlisted  early  in  the  struggle.  In  September, 
1917,  he  was  sent  for  training  to  Boise,  Idaho,  becoming  a  member  of  the  Twenty- 
second  Infantry.  Later  he  was  sent  to  Camp  Greene,  where  he  was  assigned  to  the 
One  Hundred  and  Forty-sixth  Regiment  of  the  Sixty-sixth  Field  Artillery  Brigade, 
and  in  December  of  the  same  year  went  to  France,  serving  in  that  country  and  in 
Belgium  until  the  armistice  was  signed.  He  then  went  into  Germany  with  the  army 
of  occupation  and  returning  to  America  in  July,  1919,  was  demobilized.  Mr.  Bell  was 
again  married  in  1907,  when  Miss  Ola  M.  Stryker,  a  native  daughter  of  Orgeon,  became 
his  wife.  Her  father.  Dr.  D.  S.  Stryker,  had  crossed  the  plains  with  an  ox  cart  in 
pioneer  times  long  prior  to  the  building  of  railroads.  He  was  for  many  years  a  prac- 
ticing physician  of  Portland  and  had  been  a  California  pioneer  before  he  went  to  the 
east  and  married.  The  Stryker  family  has  been  represented  on  American  soil  from 
1620,  when  Herman  Von  Stryker  came  to  the  new  world  from  Holland  and  settled  at 
New  Amsterdam,  New  York.  Later  representatives  of  the  family  "moved  up  state"  and 
established  the  town  of  Strykersville,  New  York.  Various  representatives  of  the  family 
served  with  the  American  forces  in  the  Revolutionary  war  and  in  the  War  of  1812.  Dr. 
George  Stryker  of  Everett,  Washington;  Dr.  S.  W.  Stryker  of  Portland;  Dr.  Rey  S. 
Stryker,  who  was  graduated  at  Northwestern  University  at  Evanston,  Illinois;  and  Guy 
0.  Stryker  of  Hubbard,  Oregon,  are  brothers  of  Mrs.  Bell.  Mrs.  George  Wissinger  re- 
sides in  Milwaukie,  Oregon,  and  is  in  educational  work.  The  family  were  all  under- 
graduates of  Willamette  University  at  Salem,  Oregon.  Mrs.  Bell  possesses  the  same 
spirit  of  courage  that  served  her  father  in  his  trips  across  the  plains.  She  was  for 
many  years  the  manager  of  the  Y.  W.  C.  A.  tea  room  in  Portland  and  is  largely  respon- 
sible for  the  splendid  culinary  arrangement  of  the  present  Y.  W.  C.  A.  tea  and  lunch 
rooms  in  that  city. 

Mr.  Bell  has  always  been  recognized  as  one  of  the  most  progressive  residents  of 
Hood  River.  He  built  the  first  wooden  sidewalk  in  the  town  and  promoted  and  held 
the  franchise  of  a  street  railway  for  the  city.  He  also  served  as  a  member  of  the  city 
council  for  twelve  years  and  is  a  leader  in  every  sense  of  the  term,  standing  at  all  times 
for  those  interests  and  activities  which  have  constituted  vital  forces  in  the  upbuilding 
and  development  of  the  community.  He  belongs  to  the  Hood  River  Commercial  Club 
and  has  thus  been  active  in  furthering  the  public  welfare  and  fraternally  he  is  well 
known  as  an  exemplary  representative  of  the  Masons  and  the  Elks. 


I 


WILLIAM  WALKER  DUGAN,  JB. 

Portland  has  always  been  distinguished  for  the  high  rank  of  her  bench  and  bar. 
Almost  from  the  city's  beginning  she  has  been  represented  by  men  of  ability,  capable 
of  crossing  swords  in  forensic  combat  with  the  ablest  lawyers  of  the  country.  The 
younger  generation  of  the  legal  fraternity  in  Portland  is  fully  sustaining  the  record 
previously  made  and  in  this  connection  William  Walker  Dugan,  Jr.,  is  well  known. 
He  was  born  in  Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania,  May  24,  1S8S,  and  is  a  son  of  William  Walker 
Dugan,  Sr.,  whose  birth  occurred  in  Tuscarawas  county,  Ohio,  in  1863,  while  his  father 
was  a  native  of  the  north  of  Ireland,  whence  he  came  to  the  United  States  at  the  age 
of  eighteen  years.  The  fatlier  spent  his  youthful  days  in  Tuscarawas  county  and  when 
he  attained  his  majority  removed  to  Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania.  There  he  met  and  mar- 
ried Nettie  E.  Borland,  who  was  a  great-granddaughter  of  Cornelius  Connor,  who  served 
with  the  rank  of  sergeant  in  the  Thirteenth  Virginia  Infantry  in  the  Revolutionary 
war.  For  many  years  William  W.  Dugan,  Sr.,  was  connected  with  the  transportation 
department  of  the  Pennsylvania  Company  at  Pittsburgh  and  in  1905  crossed  the  con- 
tinent to  Portland,  where  he  lived  retired  in  his  later  years,  passing  away  January  22, 
1920. 


148  HISTORY  OF  OREGOX 

His  son  and  namesake  was  reared  in  Washington  county,  Pennsylvania,  and  there 
attended  the  country  schools  and  also  the  Carnegie  high  school  of  Carnegie,  Pennsyl^ 
vania.  His  interest  in  a  professional  career  led  him  to  take  up  the  study  of  law,  which 
he  pursued  in  the  University  of  Oregon,  being  graduated  therefrom  in  1910  with  the 
LL.  B.  degree.  In  June  of  the  same  year  he  was  admitted  to  practice  at  the  Oregon 
bar  and  has  since  engaged  in  professional  duties  in  Portland.  He  early  recognized  the 
fact  that  success  at  the  bar  cannot  be  attained  through  association  nor  outside  influence 
but  must  be  the  outgrowth  of  individual  effort  and  ability.  He  has  displayed  untiring 
industry,  therefore,  in  the  preparation  of  his  cases  and  his  presentation  of  a  cause  is 
always  clear,  cogent  and  logical. 

On  the  22d  of  November,  1916,  in  Portland,  Mr.  Dugan  was  married  to  Miss  Minda 
Frost,  a  daughter  of  Louis  E.  Frost,  a  native  of  Minnesota.  They  now  have  one  son, 
William  Walker,  Jr.,  who  was  born  December  2,  1917. 

Mr.  Dugan  was  from  1912  until  1915  a  private  in  the  Oregon  Coast  Artillery  and 
during  the  war  served  as  a  private  in  the  Multnomah  Guards  of  Portland.  His  political 
endorsement  is  given  to  the  republican  party.  Fraternally  he  is  connected  with  the 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  also  belongs  to  the  City  Club  of  Portland  and 
to  the  Oregon  Society  of  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution.  His  religious  faith  is 
manifest  in  his  connection  with  the  United  Presbyterian  church  and  his  life  has  ever 
been  actuated  by  high  and  honorable  principles  that  make  for  loyalty  in  citizenship, 
integrity  and  enterprise  in  business  and  fidelity  in  friendship. 


E.  E.  FISHER,  M.  D. 

Since  1907  Dr.  E.  E.  Fisher  has  been  numbered  with  the  leading  physicians  and 
surgeons  of  Salem  and  is  now  associated  in  practice  with  Dr.  J.  H.  Garnjobst,  who 
devotes  his  attention  largely  to  the  general  practice  of  medicine,  while  Dr.  Fisher 
is  specializing  in  general  surgery.  He  maintains  a  finely  appointed  suite  of  offices 
in  the  United  States  National  Bank  building,  equipped  with  the  most  modern  instru- 
ments and  appliances,  and  his  successful  work  along  the  line  in  which  he  specializes 
has   secured   for   him   a   large   and   constantly    increasing   patronage. 

Dr.  Fisher  is  a  native  of  Nebraska.  He  was  born  in  Omaha  on  the  4th  of 
August,  1870,  and  is  a  son  of  C.  A.  H.  and  Mary  (Kirby)  Fisher.  The  father  was 
born  in  England  in  1847,  and  in  1869,  when  a  young  man  of  about  twenty-two  years, 
he  came  to  America,  settling  in  Michigan.  He  was  married  in  Adrian,  that  state, 
to  Miss  Kirby,  who  was  born  in  New  York  in  1852.  They  removed  westward  to 
Nebraska  in  1870  and  in  1902  arrived  in  Salem,  Oregon,  where  they  now  reside,  mak- 
ing their  home  at  No.  1211  Broadway.  The  father  devoted  the  greater  part  of  his 
life  to  agricultural  pursuits  and  is  now  living  retired.  In  their  family  were  seven 
children. 

Dr.  Fisher  attended  the  country  schools  in  the  vicinity  of  his  father's  home 
until  fourteen  years  of  age,  when  he  became  a  student  in  the  Highland  Park  Nor- 
mal School  at  Des  Moines,  Iowa.  He  also  attended  the  Fremont  (Neb.)  Normal 
and  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1S92.  He  taught  school  both  before  and  after 
his  graduation,  devoting  five  years  to  that  profession,  and  in  1894  he  took  up  the 
study  of  medicine,  reading  for  one  year  under  a  physician.  He  then  entered  the 
medical  department  of  Northwestern  University  of  Chicago,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  in  1898.  and  in  1907  he  was  graduated  from  the  University  of  Iowa  at  Iowa 
City,  following  which  he  came  to  Salem,  where  he  opened  an  office.  He  has  con- 
tinued in  practice  in  this  city,  specializing  in  general  surgicil  work,  in  which  he  dis- 
plays marked  skill  and  ability.  He  maintains  a  well  appointed  suite  of  offices,  equipped 
with  the  most  up-to-date  apparatus  for  diagnosis  and  every  modern  appliance  for  the 
treatment  of  disease,  including  X-Ray  machines  of  both  the  portable  and  stationary 
types.  The  stationary  machine  is  supplied  by  a  two  hundred  and  twenty  volt  current 
and  is  employed  for  diagnosis  and  therapy.  By  means  of  a  fluoroscope  he  is  able  to 
visualize  the  contents  of  the  chest  and  some  of  the  most  important  organs  of  the  abdomen. 
Radiographs  may  also  be  made  of  these  parts,  including  the  head  and  extremities. 
X-Rays  are  therapeutically  used  for  skin  diseases,  cancer  growths  and  various  goiters. 
The  only  advantage  of  the  portable  over  the  stationary  is  that  it  can  be  carried  on 
an  automobile  and  used  wherever  there  is  a  one  hundred  and  ten  volt  current 
available.     The   bacteriology   incubator   is   used   for   the   growth   and    study   of   various 


r 


DR.   E.   E.   FISHER 


HISTORY  OP  OREGON  151 

bacteria  producing  disease.  Tliis  appliance  is  electrically  heated  by  means  of  a  spe- 
cial device,  maintaining  a  uniform  temperature  equal  to  that  of  the  blood,  ninety- 
eight  and  six-tenths  degrees  Fahrenheit,  which  temperature  is  most  favorable  to 
bacterial  growth.  The  McKenzie  self-inking  polograph  is  used  for  studying  the  action 
of  the  heart  and  blood  vessels.  The  Alpine  Sunlight,  emanating  ultra  violet  rays, 
is  produced  by  the  arcing  of  an  electric  current  through  vaporized  mercury  and  filtered 
through  pure  quartz  glass.  The  ultra  violet  rays,  next-  to  the  X-Rays,  have  the 
shortest  wave  lengths  and  the  most  rapid  light  rays  at  the  violet  end  of  the  spectrum. 
They  have  no  penetrating  powers  beyond  possibly  an  eighth  of  an  inch  through 
the  skin.  They  are  chemical  in  action  on  photographies.  Therapeutically  they  are 
used  for  their  germicidal  effect  in  skin  diseases,  old  indolent  ulcers  and  tuberculosis 
of  the  skin  and  bones.  They  stimulate  the  circulation  of  the  blood  in  the  skin  and 
promote  elimination  of  waste  products,  making  them  a  valuable  adjunct  in  the 
treatment  of  pulmonary  tuberculosis  or  any  other  disease  in  which  sun  baths  are 
indicated.  The  chemical  laboratory  is  equipped  with  the  latest  clinical  chemical 
appliances  for  the  examination  of  the  various  secretions  and  excretions  ef  the  human 
body.  An  instrument  known  as  the  microtome  is  equipped  with  a  razor  blade  so 
adjusted  that  it  will  section  tissues,  frozen  or  imbedded  for  microscopical  study. 
Dr.  Fisher  has  also  proven  a  capable  educator,  having  taught  for  two  years  in  the 
medical  department  of  Willamette  University.  He  is  likewise  extensively  interested 
in  agriculture,  owning  a  farm  in  Iowa,  another  in  Nebraska  and  a  third  in  southern 
Oregon. 

In  1901  Dr.  Fisher  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Alice  Bates,  a  native  of 
Iowa  and  a  daughter  of  A.  J.  and  Helen  (Morris)  Bates.  The  only  child  of  this  union 
is  a  son,  Arthur  A.,  who  is  eight  years  of  age.  In  the  field  of  professional  service 
Dr.  Fisher  has  made  continuous  progress,  gleaning  from  comprehensive  study,  research 
and  from  practical  experience  valuable  truths  in  connection  with  the  work.  Prompted 
in  all  that  he  does  by  laudable  ambition  and  broad  humanitarian  principles,  as  a 
member  of  the  medical  fraternity  he  has  attained  high  rank  among  those  whose 
skill  is  uniformly  acknowledged,  while  his  prosperity  is  recognized  as  the  merited 
reward  of  his  labor.  He  belongs  to  the  Marion  County  and  Oregon  State  Medical 
Societies  and  the  American  Medical  Association  and  keeps  in  close  touch  with  the 
advanced  work  of  the  profession  and   its  high  ideals. 


HERBERT  EGBERT. 


A  resident  at  The  Dalles,  Herbert  Egbert  is  numbered  among  the  successful 
and  well  known  farmers  of  central  Oregon,  having  seven  hundred  and  fifty  acres  of 
valuable  land  about  nineteen  miles  from  the  city,  devoted  to  wheat  raising.  Mr.  Egbert  is 
a  native  son  of  Minnesota.  He  was  born  at  Red  Wing,  Minnesota,  July  12.  1S69,  of  the 
marriage  of  Joseph  C.  and  Susan  M.  (Davis)  Egbert.  The  Egberts  are  of  an  old  New 
England  family,  the  founder  in  America  coming  to  the  new  world  in  1627.  Among  his 
descendants  were  those  who  emigrated  westward  and  the  branch  to  which  Herbert 
Egbert  belongs  first  settled  in  Ohio  and  afterwards  in  Minnesota,  being  pioneers  of 
both  states.  One  of  his  uncles  was  a  member  of  the  first  legislature  of  Minnesota 
and  served  as  a  captain  in  the  first  militia  company  organized  in  that  state.  In  the 
Davis  line  Herbert  Egbert  comes  from  an  old  family  of  Pennsylvania  that  also  became 
identified  with  Minnesota  in  early  days.  In  the  year  1879  Joseph  C.  Egbert  brought 
his  family  to  Oregon,  settling  in  Union  county,  where  he  lived  until  1881  and  then  re- 
moved to  The  Dalles. 

Herbert  Egbert  when  three  years  old  went  with  his  parents  to  Des  Moines,  Iowa,  and 
in  1873  they  went  to  La  Porte,  Colorado,  and  later  to  The  Dalles.  Herbert  was  educated 
in  the  graded  schools  and  started  out  to  provide  for  his  own  support  by  working  in 
logging  camps  and  also  in  connection  with  cattle  raising.  He  was  thus  employed  until 
1896,  when  he  took  up  farming,  in  which  he  has  continued.  His  ranch  is  situated  in 
township  1,  north,  range  15,  east,  in  Wasco  county,  and  is  about  nineteen  miles  from 
The  Dalles.  There  he  has  seven  hundred  and  fifty  acres  of  excellent  land  which  produces 
a  crop  of  about  twelve  thousand  bushels  of  wheat  annually,  the  soil  being  splendidly 
adapted  to  the  raising  of  that  cereal.  Mr.  Egbert  also  engages  in  raising  horses,  cattle 
and  sheep  and  has  pedigreed  sires,  including  Belgian  and  Clydesdale  horses,  Hereford 
cattle  and  Oxford  sheep.     He  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  substantial  farmers  and  stock 


152  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

raisers  of  the  central  section  of  tlie  state  and  is  altogether  a  most  useful  and  valued 
citizen.  He  was  for  iive  years  president  of  the  Farmers  Union  and  is  now  president 
of  the  Standard  Hollow  Grain  Elevator  Company.  He  has  served  as  a  delegate  to  most  of 
the  grain  and  farmers  conventions  throughout  the  northwest  and  has  the  esteem  of 
the  agricultural  population  of  this  section  of  the  state  to  a  marked  degree.  His  efforts 
at  all  times  have  been  an  element  in  public  progress  and  improvement  and  his  labors 
have  been  especially  helpful  in  connection  with  the  development  of  the  farm  lands  and 
the  promotion  of  stock  raising  interests  in  the  northwest. 

In  1903  Mr.  Egbert  was  married  to  Miss  Grace  May  Johnson,  daughter  of  Joel 
Johnson,  one  of  the  best  known  residents  of  the  state.  They  were  boy  and  girl  com- 
panions and  as  they  advanced  in  years  became  sweethearts.  While  out  horseback 
riding  Miss  Johnson  was  thrown  from  her  horse  and  sustained  injuries  that  left  her  a 
cripple  for  life.  This  sad  accident  served  but  to  accentuate  the  bond  between  them 
for  though  Mrs.  Egbert  would  have  released  her  fiance  from  his  engagement  he  insisted 
upon  the  marriage  and  for  the  twelve  years  of  their  married  life  devoted  himself  to  her 
care,  giving  to  her  every  attention  and  comfort  that  thought  and  love  could  plan  until 
she  passed  away  in  1915. 

Mr.  Egbert  is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  of  the  Knights 
of  Pythias.  For  twelve  years  he  served  as  a  member  of  the  local  school  board  and  in 
every  possible  way  has  aided  in  the  growth,  progress  and  prosperity  of  his  county 
and  state.  He  was  elected  in  1920  representative  from  the  assembly  district,  embracing 
Wasco  and  Hood  River  counties.  He  crossed  the  plains  behind  the  wagons  of  his 
parents  in  1879,  when  a  youth  of  ten  years.  The  sturdy  boy  has  grown  into  a  man 
of  strong  and  honorable  purpose  whose  life  has  been  crowned  with  successful  achieve- 
ment and  whose  course  may  well  serve  to  inspire  and  encourage  others,  showing  what 
may  be  accomplished   when  energy  and  enterprise  point  out  the  way. 


HENRY    HEWETT. 


For  a  period  of  more  than  four  decades  Henry  Hewett  figured  actively,  prominently 
and  honorably  in  connection  with  the  business  development  of  Portland,  and  it  was  a 
matter  of  deep  regret  when  he  passed  away  at  his  home  on  Green  Hills,  near  Mount 
Zion,  on  the  16th  of  February,  1915.  The  enterprise,  initiative  and  progressiveness 
which  he  displayed  in  the  field  of  marine  insurance  made  him  widely  known  on  the 
Pacific  coast  and  wherever  he  was  known  he  was  held  in  high  esteem.  He  was  of 
English  birth,  born  at  Hunters  Hill,  near  Newcastle-on-Tyne,  in  the  north  of  England, 
January  15,  1847.  He  remained  a  resident  of  that  country  until  about  eighteen  years 
of  age  and  then  sought  the  opportunities  offered  in  the  new  world,  hoping  to  win  busi- 
ness advancement  by  sojourning  on  the  western  continent.  He  came  to  the  Pacific  coast 
and  after  spending  a  short  period  of  time  in  British  Columbia.  Portland  and  Cali- 
fornia, returned  to  the  Rose  City  in  1870  and  engaged  in  the  grain  business.  In  fact, 
he  was  for  a  long  period  the  principal  figure  in  the  wheat  export  trade  of  the  Pacific 
northwest.  He  cleared  the  first  cargo  of  wheat  for  the  United  Kingdom  that  ever 
went  through  the  Portland  custom-house,  the  shipment  being  made  early  in  1871. 
With  the  growth  and  development  of  the  country  he  increased  his  grain  business  and 
w^as  widely  known  as  one  of  the  leading  grain  exporters  of  the  coast.  He  later  extended 
the  scope  of  his  activities  to  include  marine  insurance  and  eventually  general  insurance 
and  finding  it  even  more  lucrative  than  the  grain  trade  he  finally  devoted  all  of  his 
energy  to  the  business.  His  knowledge  of  shipping  in  the  Pacific  northwest  was 
profound  and  thus  he  was  enabled  to  promote  his  marine  insurance  business  to  a 
point  of  gratifying  magnitude.  He  could  quote  facts  and  figures  covering  the  develop- 
ment of  marine  transportation  in  Portland  for  a  period  of  nearly  half  a  century,  as  no 
other  man  could.  This  constituted  an  important  element  in  his  success  after  he 
entered  the  insurance  field  and  enabled  him  to  build  up  a  most  substantial  underwriting 
business. 

Because  of  a  love  of  horticulture  and  a  desire  to  indulge  his  taste  along  that  line 
Mr.  Hewett  removed  to  his  farm  on  Green  Hills,  near  Mount  Zion,  in  1888  and  there  he 
planted  many  beautiful  trees  and  gave  much  attention  to  the  cultivation  of  flowers.  He 
found  the  keenest  joy  in  the  beauty  which  he  thus  developed  and  he  was  never  happier 
than  when  watching  the  unfolding  of  some  rare  blossom  or  the  steady  and  healthful 
growth  of  some  tree  which  he  had  planted. 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  153 

Mr.  Hewett  was  twice  married.  He  first  wedded  Miss  Frances  Piper  and  following 
her  death  he  married  her  sister,  Miss  Susan  Piper,  these  ladies  being  nieces  of  Captain 
John  Couch,  one  of  the  pioneer  business  men  of  Portland,  widely  and  prominently 
known  at  an  early  day.  Mr.  Hewett's  second  wife  survives  him,  as  do  four  of  his  chil- 
dren: Mrs.  William  H.  Warrens,  Mrs.  Lewis  A.  McArthur,  Mrs.  J.  Guy  Richards  and 
Henry.  Mr.  Hewett  was  in  the  sixty-eighth  year  of  his  age  when  he  passed  away. 
For  forty-five  years  he  had  lived  in  Portland  and  was  therefore  a  witness  of  the  major 
part  of  the  growth  and  development  of  the  city.  At  all  times  he  manifested  the  keenest 
interest  in  its  progress  and  in  the  welfare  of  the  state  and  his  cooperation  could  at 
all  times  be  counted  upon  to  further  any  movement  for  the  public  good,  while  his  busi- 
ness affairs  were  ever  of  a  nature  that  contributed  to  general  prosperity  as  well  as  to 
individual  success. 


EDWARD  SCHULMERICH. 


Fleeing  the  further  rigors  of  a  military  dynasty,  having  served  his  time  in  the 
German  army,  Conrad  Schulmerich  with  his  wife  Margaret  landed  in  America  in  1S50 
and  sought  the  Pacific  coast  in  1856.  There  in  Eldorado  county,  California,  in  1863, 
a  son,  Edward,  was  born  to  them.  After  nineteen  years  of  gold  mining  in  that  state 
Conrad  Schulmerich  moved  his  family  to  Oregon  and  took  up  farming  on  three  hun- 
dred and  twenty  acres  of  land  in  Washington  county. 

Edward  Shulmerich  received  a  limited  education  in  the  country  schools  and 
studied  by  himself  at  night  after  the  farm  chores  were  done.  Until  he  was  twenty-one 
years  of  age  he  worked  with  his  father  on  the  home  farm,  leaving  finally  to  take  a 
position  with  the  Oregon  Transfer  Company  in  Portland.  Twice  he  returned  to  the 
farm,  remaining  the  second  time  until  the  death  of  his  father  in  1900,  when  he  became 
associated  with  his  brothers  in  the  management  of  the  three  farms  left  them  by  their 
father.  In  1906  Mr.  Schulmerich  organized  the  Hillsboro  Commercial  Bank  and  became 
its  vice-president.  In  1909  he  was  elected  president  and  still  presides  over  that  thriv- 
ing institution.  Extending  his  enterprise  he  secured  in  1916  the  majority  of  the  stock 
of  the  Hillsboro  Mercantile  Company  which  he  managed  until  1920  when  he  disposed 
of  his  interests  and  retired  from  the  mercantile  business.  He  became  associated  with 
the  Lumberman's  National  Bank  of  Portland  in  1908  and  when  that  establishment  was 
absorbed  by  the  United  States  National  Bank  he  retained  his  interests  in  the  transfer. 
In  1911  he  built  the  handsome  two-story  brick  block  on  the  corner  of  Second  and 
Main  streets  occupied  by  the  Hillsboro  Commercial  Bank  and  by  various  professional 
oflices.  Agriculture  has  continued  to  remain  one  of  his  avocations  and  he  holds  inter- 
ests with  his  brothers  in  farms  in  Lane  and  Douglas  counties.  The  land  in  the  latter 
section,  devoted  to  the  raising  of  thoroughbred  Hereford  cattle,  embraces  some  two 
thousand  acres. 

Mr.  Schulmerich  was  married  in  1S89  to  Alice  Bailey,  daughter  of  Calvin  Bailey. 
Mrs.  Schulmerich  died  in  1901,  leaving  three  children:  Bruce,  who  is  in  business  in 
California;  Roy,  a  lumberman  at  Cochran;  and  Melvin,  a  student  at  Columbia  Uni- 
versity. Mr.  Schulmerich's  present  wife  was  Miss  Ellen  Gillenwater  of  Virginia,  the 
daughter  of  S.  H.  Gillenwater.     There  are  no  children  of  this  marriage. 

Mr.  Shulmerich  is  a  Mason  and  a  Knight  of  Pythias  who  has  the  distinction  of 
being   made  master   within   eighteen   months   after   his    initiation. 

No  man  has  done  more  to  build  up  the  state  of  Oregon,  and  none  deserves  more 
praise  as  a  citizen  and  a  financier  than  Edward  Schulmerich. 


ALFRED  J.   DAVIDSON. 

Alfred  J.  Davidson,  who  since  the  1st  of  September,  1920,  has  been  general  man- 
ager of  the  Spokane,  Portland  &  Seattle  Railroad,  with  office  in  the  Pittock  block 
in  Portland,  has  through  persistent  application,  determination  and  ability  of  an 
unusually  high  order,  risen  to  a  position  of  eminence  in  railroad  circles  of  the 
United  States.  Mr.  Davidson  is  a  native  of  Illinois.  He  was  born  in  Decatur  on  the 
14th  of  April,  186.3,  a  son  of  Alfred  B.  Davidson,  whose  birth  occurred  in  Ohio  in 
1835.      His    paternal    grandfather    was    also    a    native    of    the    Buckeye    state    and    the 


154  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

family  is  of  English  extraction.  The  father  was  an  honored  veteran  of  the  Civil  war, 
enlisting  in  1861  as  a  private  in  the  Ninety-fourth  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry  and 
serving  throughout  the  period  of  hostilities.  He  was  married  in  Ohio  to  Miss  Helen 
C.  Mitchell,  a  native  of  Decatur,  Illinois,  who  is  now  residing  in  Chicago.  He  passed 
away  in  Illinois  in  1902. 

Alfred  J.  Davidson  was  reared  in  Lexington,  Illinois,  and  there  attended  the  public 
and  high  schools.  Railroading  had  always  appealed  to  him  and  he  decided  to  abandon 
a  college  course  in  order  that  he  might  at  once  turn  his  attention  to  his  chosen  line 
of  work.  His  first  position  was  with  the  Chicago  &  Alton  Railroad  Company  and  he 
has  since  been  identified  with  railroad  interests,  acquiring  through  broad  practical 
experience  a  thorough  and  comprehensive  knowledge  of  railroad  construction  and 
operation.  In  1910  he  came  to  Portland  as  superintendent  of  telegraph  and  car  service 
of  the  Spokane,  Portland  &  Seattle  Railroad  and  in  1918  was  made  United  States  rail- 
road administrator,  while  since  the  1st  of  September,  1920,  he  has  served  as  general 
manager  of  the  road.  In  the  control  of  the  important  interests  of  which  he  has  charge 
he  displays  marked  ability,  energy  and  initiative,  regarding  no  detail  as  too  unim- 
portant to  receive  his  attention  and  at  the  same  time  controlling  the  larger  interests 
involved  with  notable  assurance  and  power.  Possessing  executive  ability  of  an  un- 
usually high  order  he  has  surrounded  himself  with  a  corps  of  able  assistants  whom 
he  treats  with  the  utmost  fairness  and  consideration,  thus  developing  a  spirit  of  co- 
operation resulting  in  one  hundred  per  cent  efficiency. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Davidson  is  a  republican  and  his  religious  faith  is  indi- 
cated by  his  membership  in  the  Baptist  church.  He  is  a  loyal  and  public-spirited  citizen 
and  as  a  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  gives  his  earnest  support  to  the  well 
devised  plans  and  projects  of  that  organization  for  the  development  of  the  city  and 
the  extension  of  its  trade  relations.  His  life  in  every  relation  has  been  characterized 
by  high  and  honorable  principles  and  laudable  ambition,  energy  and  determination 
have  brought  him  to  a  foremost  position  in  railroad  circles  of  the  United  States. 


LOUIS   T.   MERWIN. 

Louis  T.  Merwin  is  a  man  of  advanced  scientific  attainments,  who  through  com- 
prehensive study  and  broad  practical  experience  as  a  consulting  engineer  has  become 
well  qualified  for  the  responsible  duties  which  now  devolve  upon  him  as  vice  president 
and  general  manager  of  the  Northwestern  Electric  Company  of  Portland.  A  native 
of  Plainfield,  New  Jersey,  he  was  born  October  23,  1873,  his  parents  being  C.  E. 
and  Helen  (Green)  Merwin,  the  former  a  native  of  Milford,  Connecticut,  and  the 
latter  of  St.  Louis,  Missouri.  The  father  was  a  noted  educator,  following  that  pro- 
fession during  most  of  his  active  life.  At  one  time  he  engaged  in  teaching  in  St. 
Louis  and  in  1878  came  to  the  Pacific  coast,  settling  in  Pleasanton,  Alameda  county, 
California,  and  six  years  later  in  Oakland,  California,  where  he  again  took  up  his 
professional  work,  his  activities  along  that  line  extending  from  the  Atlantic  to  the 
Pacific  coast.  He  is  now  living  retired  at  Camp  Meeker,  in  Sonoma  county,  California, 
and  has  attained  the  advanced  age  of  eighty-seven  years. 

After  completing  the  work  of  the  grammar  and  high  schools  Louis  T.  Merwin 
became  a  student  in  the  University  of  California  at  Berkeley,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Science.  He  then  took  up  the  profession 
of  teaching,  becoming  an  instructor  in  the  high  school  at  Napa,  California,  and  sub- 
sequently was  for  three  years  a  teacher  in  the  Polytechnic  high  school  at  San  Fran- 
cisco. As  an  educator  he  was  most  successful,  imparting  clearly  and  readily  to  others 
the  knowledge  he  had  acquired.  He  entered  upon  electrical  work  in  connection 
with  the  San  Joaquin  Light  &  Power  Company  at  Fresno,  California,  and  for  five 
years  was  identified  with  that  corporation.  He  next  became  electrical  engineer  for  the 
Goldfield  Consolidated  Mines  Company,  having  charge  of  the  installation  of  all  the 
electrical  equipment  of  that  company  in  their  mines  and  mills  at  Goldfield,  Nevada, 
following  which  he  acted  as  consulting  electrical  engineer  for  the  Tonopah  &  Goldfield 
Railroad  and  also  for  the  Tonopah  Mining  Company.  He  left  Goldfield  in  1911  to  take 
up  the  work  of  overhauling  the  plant  of  the  Trinity  Globe  Mines  Company  in  Trinity 
county,  California,  and  following  the  completion  of  that  task  came  to  Portland  in 
May,  1912,  to  assist  in  designing  the  transmission  lines  of  the  Northwestern  Electric 
Company,   also  having  charge   of  their  erection.     On   the   completion   of   this   work   in 


LOUIS   T.   MERWIN 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  157 

1913  he  was  made  superintendent  of  operation  and  in  1916  became  superintendent, 
having  charge  of  all  physical  activities  of  the  company.  In  July,  1920,  he  was 
advanced  to  the  office  of  assistant  general  manager,  and  in  November  of  that  same 
year  was  made  vice  president  and  general  manager,  which  responsible  position  he 
now  occupies.  He  has  a  thorough  knowledge  of  the  scientific  principles  which  under- 
lie the  profession  of  electrical  engineering  and  is  proving  most  capable  in  the  dis- 
charge of  his  important  duties,  his  services  being  of  great  value  to  his  employers. 

In  Goldfield,  Nevada,  in  1907.  Mr.  Merwin  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Olive 
Dunbar,  a  daughter  of  J.  A.  Dunbar,  of  San  Luis  Obispo,  California,  and  a  graduate 
of  Leland  Stanford  University.  Fraternally  he  is  identified  with  the  Masons,  belong- 
ing to  the  blue  lodge  at  Goldfield,  Nevada,  and  his  social  nature  finds  expression  in 
his  membership  in  the  Acacia,  Arlington,  Old  Colony,  Waverly  Country  Club  and 
Multnomah  Amateur  Athletic  Clubs.  He  is  also  an  interested  and  active  member 
of  the  East  Side  Business  Men's  Association,  the  City  Club  and  the  Chamber  of 
Commerce  and  his  aid  and  cooperation  can  always  be  relied  upon  to  further  all 
worthy  plans  and  measures  for  the  advancement  and  upbuilding  of  his  city.  His  pro- 
fessional connections  are  with  the  American  Institute  of  Electrical  Engineers,  the 
American  Association  of  Engineers,  the  National  Electric  Light  Association  and  the 
Northwest  Electrical  Power  Association,  as  well  as  representing  the  electrical  engi- 
neers as  a  delegate  to  the  Oregon  Technical  Council.  He  has  always  been  inter- 
ested in  athletic  sports  and  while  a  university  student  was  captain  of  the  track 
team.  His  professional  standing  is  of  the  highest  and  he  is  a  representative  of  a 
family  distinguished  by  superior  mental  endowments,  his  father  being  a  noted  educa- 
tor, while  his  sister  is  a  successful  physician,  now  practicing  her  profession  in  China, 
in  which  country  his  mother  passed  away  in  1916.  His  close  application,  unremitting 
energy  and  quick  perception  have  been  salient  factors  in  the  attainment  of  his 
present  success  and  through  his  labors  he  has  contributed  in  substantial  measure  to 
the  development  of  the  material  resources  of  various  sections  of  the  country,  his 
work  being  of  great  value  and  importance.  His  life  has  been  a  busy,  active  and  use- 
ful one  and  Portland  numbers  him  among  her  valued  and  representative  citizens. 


DR.  PETER  W.  VAN  SICKLE. 

Dr.  Peter  W.  Van  Sickle,  well  qualified  by  thorough  preliminary  training  for  the 
active  duties  of  his  profession,  is  now  successfully  engaged  in  practice  in  Tualatin. 
He  was  born  in  Illinois,  May  3.  1S76,  the  son  of  Andrew  B.  and  Minerva  (Brown) 
Van  Sickle.  The  family  came  to  America  before  the  Revolution  and  were  among  the 
earliest  citizens  of  the  state  of  New  York.  Dr.  Andrew  B.  Van  Sickle  was  a  pioneer 
of  Illinois  and  for  nearly  a  half  century  was  a  leading  dentist  in  that  state. 

Peter  W.  Van  Sickle  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Warren,  Illinois,  and  upon 
being  graduated  he  became  a  jeweler,  remaining  in  this  work  for  nine  years.  He  then 
took  up  railroad  work  and  it  was  not  until  1907  that  he  determined,  on  account  of  ill 
health,  to  come  to  the  Pacific  coast,  locating  at  Portland  where  he  studied  medicine 
and  after  his  graduation  became  a  rupture  specialist.  In  1910  he  located  at  Tualatin, 
M^ashington  county,  and  has  since  practiced  his  profession  there.  Dr.  Van'  Sickle  has 
made  steady  advancement,  for  he  is  conceded  to  be  a  master  of  his  specialty.  He  is 
not  a  believer  in  the  wearing  of  a  truss,  but  depends  upon  other  methods  of  cure. 
He  has  been  successful  also  in  the  treatment  of  rheumatism  and  heart  disorders. 

Dr.  Van  Sickle  married  Miss  Ina  Adams,  a  native  of  Roseburg,  Oregon,  daughter 
of  George  0.  Adams  of  that  city.  They  have  three  children:  Myrtle,  the  wife  of  H.  J. 
Bernard  of  Portland;  and  Gladys  and  Maude. 


RALPH  A.  HOLTE. 


Prominent  in  the  financial  circles  of  Umatilla  county  is  Ralph  A.  Holte,  who  is 
cashier  of  the  Bank  of  Stanfield.  He  is  a  native  of  North  Dakota,  born  in  Ellendale, 
that  state,  on  the  23d  of  March,  1S86.  a  son  of  N.  T.  and  Rosa  (Arneson)  Holte.  The 
father  was  born  in  Norway,  while  the  mother  is  a  native  of  Monroe,  Wisconsin. 
When  nineteen  years  of  age  N.  T.  Holte  came  to  the  United  States  and  after  residing 


158  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

for  some  time  in  Minneapolis,  Minnesota,  he  came  to  North  Dakota.  His  first  residence 
in  that  state  was  at  Fargo  but  he  later  removed  to  EUendale,  where  he  engaged  in  the 
furniture  business  which  he  is  still  conducting,  his  business  having  reached  extensive 
proportions.  The  marriage  of  N.  T.  Holte  and  Rosa  Arneson  occurred  in  the  place  of 
their  present  residence.  Mr.  Holte  is  a  stanch  supporter  of  the  republican  party  and 
an  active  member  of  the  Odd   Fellows. 

Ralph  A.  Holte  spent -his  boyhood  in  EUendale,  receiving  a  good  common  school 
education  and  later  he  entered  the  State  Industrial  school  at  that  place.  After  putting 
his  textbooks  aside  he  engaged  in  the  undertaking  business  with  his  father  for  a  short 
time,  after  which  he  accepted  a  position  as  assistant  cashier  of  the  First  National 
Bank  of  EUendale.  In  1910  he  removed  to  Stanfield,  Oregon,  to  accept  a  like  position 
in  the  Bank  of  Stanfield  and  he  has  continued  in  that  connection  to  the  entire  satis- 
faction of  the  bank  ofl^cers  and  the  patrons.  This  bank  was  organized  in  1909  by  Dr. 
Henry  Waldo  Coe,  Prank  Sloan  and  R.  N.  Stanfield  of  Portland  and  has  a  capital  stock 
of  twenty-five  thousand  dollars.  In  addition  to  his  banking  affairs  Mr.  Holte  is  inter- 
ested in  a  lumber-yard  in  Stanfield  in  connection  with  his  father-in-law,  M.  R.  Ling. 
Mr.  Holte  is  president  of  this  business  and  it  has  grown  to  extensive  proportions.  As 
a  family  man  he  is  interested  in  the  educational  advantages  of  Stanfield  and  to  that 
end  is  serving  as  school  clerk. 

In  1909  Mr.  Holte  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Georgia  A.  Ling,  a  daughter  of 
M.  R.  and  Sarah  E.  Ling,  and  a  native  of  Lime  Spring,  Iowa.  Her  parents  are  also 
natives  of  that  state  but  are  now  residing  in  Oregon,  where  her  father  is  engaged  in 
the  lumber  business  with  Mr.  Holte.  To  the  union  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Holte  two  children 
have  been  born:   Marion  Joyce  and  Alpha  Elizabeth, 

Mr.  Holte  is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  though  the 
greater  part  of  his  time  is  devoted  to  his  work  he  is  active  in  the  interests  of  that 
organization,  also  in  the  Masons,  and  is  a  member  of  the  Portland  Shrine.  He  is  a 
republican  in  politics,  beingi  a  firm  believer  in  the  principles  of  that  party  as  factors 
in  good  government.  In  his  position  as  cashier  he  has  the  confidence  and  respect  of 
all  with  whom  he  has'  come  into  contact  and  has  won  for  himself  a  host  of  friends. 
He  is  loyal  and  enterprising,  possessing  the  progressive  spirit  of  the  times  and  ac- 
complishing what  he  undertakes. 


CLARENCE  EMORY  MOULTON. 

Following  in  the  professional  footsteps  of  his  distinguished  father,  an  eminent 
jurist  of  Washington,  D.  C,  and  an  authority  in  legal  matters,  Clarence  Emory  Moul- 
ton  has  won  for  himself  an  enviable  position  at  the  Portland  bar  and  is  also  a  promi- 
nent figure  in  business  circles  of  the  city  as  secretary  of  the  Orega  Land  Company 
and  vice  president  of  the  Moulton  Lumber  Company.  Mr.  Moulton  was  born  in  Wash- 
ington, D.  C,  August  12,  1866,  and  comes  of  distinguished  ancestry,  his  great-grand- 
fathers. Noah  Moulton  and  Thomas  Hale,  having  served  in  the  Revolutionary  war, 
while  his  grandfather,  Captain  David  Moulton,  a  native  of  Vermont,  fought  in  the 
War  of  1S12.  His  father.  Hosea  B.  Moulton.  was  born  in  the  town  of  Concord,  New 
Hampshire,  in  1S44,  and  in  the  schools  of  that  state  pursued  his,  education  until  the 
outbreak  of  the  Civil  war.  when,  filled  with  the  spirit  of  patriotism,  he  offered  his 
services  to  his  country,  enlisting  as  a  member  of  the  Second  New  Hampshire  Volun- 
teers, which  became  a  part  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac.  He  served  with  that  command 
for  two  years  and  at  the  battle  of  Gettysburg  was  severely  wounded.  Following  his 
convalescence  he  was  made  assistant  superintendent  of  a  military  hospital  in  Wash- 
ington, D.  C,  and  in  December,  1863,  was  assigned  to  a  position  as  foreman  in  the 
laboratory  of  the  arsenal  at  Washington.  At  the  close  of  the  war,  in  1865,  he  was 
appointed  an  examiner  in  the  treasury  department  and  resuming  his  studies  was 
graduated  from  the  National  University  in  1S6S.  He  then  resigned  his  position  in  the 
department  and  entered  upon  the  practice  of  his  profession  in  Washington,  where  he 
still  resides,  being  regarded  as  one  of  the  most  able  jurists  of  the  city.  From  1875  to 
1879  he  occupied  the  district  bench,  where  he  made  a  most  commendable  record,  char- 
acterized by  the  utmost  fidelity  to  duty  and  by  a  masterful  grasp  of  every  problem  pre- 
sented for  solution.  In  1879  he  resigned  his  office  and  is  now  engaged  in  private 
practice,  being  accorded  a  large  clientele.  He  has  compiled  the  laws  of  the  District 
of  Columbia  for  two  National   Digests  and   other  works  and   is  a  recognized  authority 


HISTOEY  OF  OREGON  159 

in  legal  matters.  He  is  now  serving  as  president  of  the  Vermont  State  Association 
of  Washington,  D.  C.  He  wedded  Annie  Reese  of  Virginia  who  passed  away  in  Wash- 
ington  in  1891. 

Clarence  E.  Moulton  acquired  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  and  also 
received  private  tuition.  Later  he  became  a  student  in  Hunt's  Academy  at  Washington, 
D.  C,  and  subsequently  entered  Georgetown  University,  from  which  he  was  graduated 
in  June,  1888,  with  the  degree  of  LL.  B.  On  the  20th  of  June,  18SS,  he  was  admitted 
to  the  supreme  court  of  the  District  of  Columbia  at  Washington,  D.  C,  and  in  the 
same  year  to  the  United  States  district  court  for  the  Territory  of  Washington,  at 
Tacoma;  on  the  13th  of  May,  1891,  to  the  supreme  court  of  the  State  of  Washington, 
at  Olympia;  February  19,  1906,  to  the  supreme  court  of  Oregon,  at  Salem;  and  on 
the  13th  of  October,  1908,  to  the  United  States  district  court  and  the  circuit  court 
of  Oregon,  at  Portland.  In  1887  and  1888  he  was  assistant  marshal  of  the  supreme 
court  of  the  United  States  at  Washington,  D.  C,  and  resigned  to  come  west  with  the 
late  Justice  Stephen  J.  Field  of  the  United  States  supreme  court.  As  private  secretary 
he  accompanied  Justice  Field  on  his  circuit  in  Oregon  and  California  in  the  summer 
of  1888  and  being  pleased  with  this  section  of  the  country  decided  to  locate  at  Tacoma, 
Washington.  He  was  land  attorney  for  the  Northern  Pacific  Railway  Company  for 
Washington,  Oregon  and  Idaho,  from  1888  until  1905,  when  he  resigned  to  engage  in 
private  practice  in  Portland,  where  he  has  since  resided,  being  now  accorded  a  large 
and  representative  clientage.  He  is  noted  among  lawyers  for  the  wide  research  and 
provident  care  with  which  he  prepares  his  cases.  While  well  grounded  in  the  prin- 
ciples of  common  law  when  admitted  to  the  bar  he  has  continued  through  the  whole 
of  his  professional  life  a  diligent  student  of  those  elementary  principles  which  con- 
stitute the  basis  of  all  legal  science  and  this  knowledge  has  served  him  well  in  many  a 
legal  battle  before  the  court.  Mr.  Moulton  also  possesses  excellent  business  ability 
and  is  secretary  and  a  large  stockholder  of  the  Orega  Land  Company,  which  has  large 
timber  interests  in  Washington  and  Oregon.  He  is  also  vice  president  of  the  Moulton 
Lumber  Company,  which  is  operating  two  sawmills  at  Moulton,  Washington,  and  his 
business  interests  are  capably  and  profitably  managed. 

On  the  4th  of  December,  1889,  in  Washington,  D.  C,  Mr.  Moulton  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Jennie  Drury,  a  daughter  of  the  late  William  Calvert  Drury,  who 
was  a  native  of  Maryland  and  a  descendant  of  the  Calvert  family,  who  became  the 
founders  of  the  state.  The  children  of  this  marriage  are:  Dorothy,  the  wife  of  Otto 
H.  Mattern  of  Portland;  and  Mildred,  who  married  Oscar  J.  Closset,  also  a  resident 
of  this   city. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Moulton  is  a  republican  and  his  religious  faith  is  indi- 
cated in  the  fact  that  he  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  having  been 
reared  in  that  faith.  In  Masonry  he  has  attained  the  thirty-second  degree  in  the  Scot- 
tish Rite  and  is  a  member  of  Al  Kader  Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  and  identified  with 
the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  His  professional  connections  are  w|th  the 
Multnomah  County  and  Oregon  State  Bar  Associations  and  his  interest  in  the'^velfare 
and  advancement  of  his  city  is  indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  Chamber  of 
Commerce.  Of  a  social,  genial  nature,  he  is  a  popular  member  of  the  Arlington,  Mult- 
nomah Amateur  Athletic,  Press,  Multorpor,  Republican  and  Roosevelt  Republican  Clubs, 
the  Oregon  State  Motor  Association  and  the  Apollo  Club,  and  during  the  World  war 
served  on  the  legal  advisory  board  and  also  aided  in  promoting  the  various  bond  drives. 
He  has  ever  conformed  his  practice  to  the  highest  ethics  of  the  profession  and  is 
widely  recognized  as  an  able  minister  in  the  temple  of  justice,  while  in  business  circles 
his  standing  is  equally  high.  As  a  citizen  he  is  progressive  and  public-spirited  and 
in  every  relation  his  life  has  measured  up  to  the  highest  standards,  making  him  a 
man  whom  to  know  is  to  esteem  and  admire. 


SAMUEL  EDWARD  BARTMESS. 

Samuel  Edward  Bartmess,  who  is  engaged  in  the  furniture  and  undertaking  busi- 
ness at  Hood  River,  was  born  in  Dayton,  Indiana,  in  1853,  his  parents  being  Oliver 
Cromwell  and  Sarah  (Clarke)  Bartmess,  who  were  pioneer  residents  of  Indiana. 
The  first  record  of  a  representative  of  the  family  in  America  is  that  of  John  Adams 
Bartmess,  who  came  to  the  new   world  from   the   valley  of   the  Rhine   in   1751  on  the 


160  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

sloop  Patience.  He  first  settled  in  Pennsylvania  and  after  his  marriage  to  Sophia 
Rizer.  daughter  of  a  Lutheran  minister,  the  Rev.  George  Rizer,  he  removed  to  Maryland. 

Samuel  E.  Bartmess.  whose  name  introduces  this  review,  was  educated  in  the 
graded  schools  of  Dayton,  Indiana,  and  in  the  Otterbein  University  at  Westerville, 
Ohio,  from  which  institution  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1S79.  He  then  took 
up  farming  and  devoted  his  attention  to  agricultural  pursuits  for  ten  years.  In  1890 
he  sold  his  farm  property  and  came  west  on  a  visit  to  Hood  River.  He  was  so  pleased 
with  this  section  of  the  country  that  he  concluded  to  make  the  city  his  home  and  here 
purchased  a  furniture  store,  to  which  he  has  added  an  undertaking  department.  For 
thirty  years  he  has  thus  served  his  community  in  the  sale  of  furniture  and  under- 
taking supplies  and  he  possesses  two  diplomas  as  a  graduate  embalmer.  His  business 
covers  Hood  River  and  a  portion  of  Wasco  county  and  also  extends  into  the  state  of 
Washington.  He  has  full  equipment  for  funerals  in  every  particular  and  his  courtesy 
and  kindliness,  as  well  as  his  ability  and  equipment,  have  been  strong  factors  in  win- 
ning him  his  patronage. 

In  1880  Mr.  Bartmess  was  married  to  Miss  Elda  E.  Grouse,  an  accomplished  young 
lady  and  a  daughter  of  Dr.  David  H.  Grouse,  who  was  a  pioneer  of  Indiana  and  prac- 
ticed his  profession  there  for  more  than  forty  years.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bartmess  have 
been  born  the  following  named:  Earl  Kumler,  who  is  a  resident  of  Portland  and  is 
a  technical  draftsman  with  the  Northwestern  Shipbuilding  Company;  Meigs  William, 
living  in  Cleveland,  Ohio,  being  a  designer  of  motors  with  the  Adams-Bagnall  Electric 
Company,  having  graduated  with  honors  from  the  University  of  Oregon,  after  which 
he  was  for  a  time  electrical  expert  with  the  Westinghouse  Company;  Sallie  A.,  who 
ia  the  wife  of  W.  B.  Small  of  Portland;  and  Marie  Louise,  who  is  at  home  with  her 
parents. 

Mr.  Bartmess  has  been  alderman  of  Hood  River  and  for  many  years  coroner  of 
Hood  River  county.  Fraternally  he  is  an  Odd  Fellow  and  both  he  and  his  wife  are 
active  and  prominent  members  of  the  Riverside  Congregational  church,  Mrs.  Bartmess 
being  superintendent  of  the  Sunday  school.  She  was  also  president  of  the  Woman's 
Relief  Corps  and  is  a  member  of  the  Hood  River  Woman's  Club.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Bartmess  were  active  workers  in  all  the  drives  made  for  financing  the  war  and  main- 
taining the  interests  and  welfare  of  the  soldiers  in  camp  and  field.  They  are  promi- 
nent in  every  movement  tliat  tends  to  the  welfare  of  Hood  River  and  their  labors  have 
been  far-reaching  and  resultant. 


NEWTON  WILLIAM  BORDEN. 

Newton  William  Borden,  of  Medford,  where  since  1913  he  has  engaged  in  the 
practice  of  law,  was  born  in  Virginia  in  18S0,  his  parents  being  Hampson  and 
Elizabeth  (Hammond)  Borden.  The  family  is  one  of  the  oldest  in  North  America 
and  the  ancestral  records  contain  many  prominent  names,  including  that  of  Sir 
Robert  Borden,  premier  of  Canada:  Gail  Borden,  promoter  of  the  condensed  milk 
business;  and  Henry  Borden,  a  southern  railway  executive.  All  of  these  are  repre- 
sentatives of  the  Borden  family  that  was  founded  on  the  shores  of  North  America 
in  the  early  days  of  colonial  settlement  here.  Hampson  Borden  was  born  in  the 
Shenandoah   valley   of   Virginia,   where   his   father  was   one   of   the   first   settlers. 

After  receiving  his  early  educational  training  in  his  home  state  Newton  W. 
Borden  worked  his  way  through  the  Ohio  Northern  University  and  afterward  took 
up  the  study  of  law  in  the  Intercontinental  University,  Washington,  D.  C.  He  next 
secured  a  responsible  position  in  the  post  office  department  in  the  national  capital 
and  remained  there  until  his  health  caused  him  to  seek  a  change  of  climate  on  the 
Pacific  coast.  He  located  in  Portland.  He  completed  his  preparation  for  the  bar  by  a 
course  in  the  Portland  Law  School  and  was  admitted  to  practice  before  the  supreme 
court  in  1913.  He  then  entered  upon  the  active  work  of  his  profession  in  Portland, 
but  found  that  his  health  demanded  a  higher  altitude  and  in  1913  he  removed  to 
Medford,  where  he  has  since  continuously  and  successfully  practiced.  His  ability 
was  quickly  recognized  in  his  new  home  and  his  forceful  energy,  his  cultured  man- 
ner and  his  sterling  worth  soon  made  for  him  many  warm  friends. 

In  1903  Mr.  Borden  was  married  to  Miss  Ora  0.  Wisman.  a  daughter  of  Hampson 
Wisman,  a  native  of  his  home  county  and  representative  of  one  of  the  old  pioneer 
families   of   Virginia.     The   children    of   this   marriage   are:    Hoxsey   J.    and   Winifred, 


^ 


NEWTON   W.    BORDEN 


HISTOKY  OF  OREGON  163 

who  are  attending  the  public  schools  of  Medford,  the  former  having  reached  the  high 
school. 

Mr.  Borden  iinds  relaxation  from  his  office  and  court  duties  In  his  garden  and 
when  the  opportunity  offers  indulges  in  camping  and  fishing.  He  is  a  past  chancellor 
commander  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  is  a  member  of  the  Grand  Lodge  of  that 
order.  He  is  also  connected  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  with 
the  Woodmen  of  the  World,  being  a  past  counselor  commander  in  the  latter  organi- 
zation. His  political  faith  is  democratic  and  at  the  present  time  he  is  secretary 
of  the  Jackson  county  democratic  committee.  With  the  best  years  of  his  lite  before 
him  and  backed  by  the  reputation  he  has  already  won  Newton  W.  Borden  has  a  future 
that  is  already  assured. 


SAMUEL   S.   LOGAN. 


Samuel  S.  Logan,  who  was  at  one  time  a  highly  respected  and  successful  grocery 
merchant,  doing  business  at  No.  994  Alberta  street,  in  Portland,  passed  away  on  the 
1st  of  June,  1920.  He  was  fifty-two  years  of  age,  his  birth  having  occurred  at  Pleasant- 
ville,  in  Marion  county,  Iowa,  in  1S6S.  His  parents  were  Franklin  and  Martha  (Met- 
calf)  Logan,  who  came  to  Oregon  in  1873,  settling  first  at  Albany,  where  their  son, 
Samuel  S.,  then  a  lad  of  but  five  years,  grew  to  adult  age.  He  acquired  his  education 
in  the  schools  of  that  place  and  in  early  life  took  up  railroad  work,  which  he  followed 
for  a  time.  In  1896,  desirous  of  engaging  in  business  on  his  own  account,  he  opened  a 
grocery  store  at  Troutdale  and  while  there  residing  he  served  as  the  first  treasurer 
of  that  place.  In  February,  1912,  he  removed  his  grocery  stock  to  the  present  location 
at  No.  994  Alberta  street,  in  Portland,  and  there  carried  on  the  business  to  the  time 
of  his  demise,  since  which  time  the  store  has  been  taken  over  by  his  widow  and  son. 
He  always  carried  a  large  and  well  selected  line  of  staple  and  fancy  groceries  and  put 
forth  every  effort  to  please  his  customers  through  honorable  business  methods  and  by 
giving  to  them  the  line  of  goods  desired. 

On  the  2d  of  November,  1891,  Mr.  Logan  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Wilhel- 
mina  Wehner,  a  daughter  of  Herman  and  Caroline  (Wachtman)  Wehner.  They  became 
the  parents  of  two  sons,  John  W.  and  Earl  H. 

Mr.  Logan  was  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  also  of  the  United  Artisans 
and  he  likewise  had  membership  in  the  Order  of  the  Eastern  Star.  He  was  always 
loyal  to  the  teachings  of  the  craft  and  exemplified  in  his  life  its  principles  concerning 
the  brotherhood  of  man  and  the  obligations  thereby  imposed.  His  political  endorse- 
ment was  given  to  the  democratic  party  but  he  did  not  seek  nor  desire  ofl5ce,  preferring 
to  concentrate  his  efforts  and  attention  upon  his  business  affairs.  By  reason  of  his 
close  application  he  became  a  successful  and  highly  respected  business  man,  enjoying 
the  confidence  and  goodwill  of  all  who  knew  him. 


GEORGE  WILLIAM  JOHNSTON. 

George  W.  Johnston,  a  leading  citizen  of  Dufur,  Oregon,  where  he  is  extensively 
engaged  in  banking  and  mercantile  pursuits^  is  a  native  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada, 
born  in  Centerville,  New  Brunswick,  in  1859.  He  is  a  son  of  James  and  Anna  (Cogs- 
well) Johnston,  who  were  early  settlers  in  Canada,  the  father  in  New  Brunswick  and 
the  mother  in  Nova  Scotia. 

George  W.  Johnston  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  his  native  town  and  when 
eighteen  years  old  he  decided  to  seek  his  fortune  in  the  west.  After  remaining  for 
a  short  time  in  western  Canada,  he  crossed  the  border  and  came  to  Oregon,  where  for 
five  years  he  was  employed  at  railroad  work.  In  1884  he  removed  to  Dufur,  where  he 
established  himself  in  the  general  mercantile  business.  Under  careful  management 
and  by  the  exercise  of  keen  judgment  in  the  conduct  of  his  store,  it  gradually  grew 
from  modest  beginnings  to  be  one  of  the  largest  in  this  section  of  the  state. 

In  1904,  in  association  with  two  brothers.  Mr.  Johnston  organized  the  Johnston 
Brothers  Bank  of  Dufur.  of  which  he  is  president.  This  bank  has  been  a  prominent 
factor  in  the  commercial  development  of  Dufur  and  surrounding  district  since  its 
inception,  serving  the  people  who  have  business  relations  with   it  in  a  thoroughly  ac- 


164  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

ceptable  manner.  In  1S89-90,  Mr.  Johnston  represented  Wasco  and  Sherman  counties 
in  the  Oregon  legislature,  in  the  affairs  of  which  he  took  an  intelligent  part.  He 
also  served  as  mayor  of  Dufur.  While  not  now  especially  active  in  political  affairs, 
he  has  never  lost  touch  with  civic  matters,  in  which  he  has  always  been  an  eager 
and  helpful  worker,  every  movement  designed  for  the  public  welfare  having  his  ardent 
support.  In  addition  to  his  large  mercantile  and  banking  interests,  he  has  been 
an  extensive  holder  of  land  in  Wasco  county.  While  he  has  disposed  of  some  two 
thousand  acres  of  orchard  property  to  the  Dufur  Orchard  Company,  he  still  retains 
about  one  hundred  and  twenty-five  acres  of  choice  orchard  land. 

In  1S88  Mr,  Johnston  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Reed,  a  daughter  of  Robert 
B.  Reed,  a  pioneer  of  The  Dalles.  Having  no  children  of  their  own,  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Johnston  have  adopted  and  are  rearing  a  niece,  Lucille  Elaine,  who  is  now  (1920)  a 
senior  of  the  University  of  Oregon.  Mr.  Johnston  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  order, 
being  a  Knight  Templar  and  a  Noble  of  the  Mystic  Shrine,  and  is  a  past  master  of  the 
blue  lodge.  He  is  also  connected  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Woodmen 
of  the  World.  He  and  his  wife  take  an  earnest  interest  in  the  social  and  cultural 
activities  of  Dufur  and  district,  and  their  efforts  have  been  ever  directed  to  the  sup- 
port of  all  proper  movements  calculated  to  advance  the  welfare  of  the  community  in 
which  they  have  been  making  their  home  for  many  years. 


JOHN   WESLEY  WISEMAN. 


After  long  connection  with  ranching  interests  during  which  he  met  with  substan- 
tial success,  John  Wesley  Wiseman  is  now  living  retired  in  Portland,  enjoying  in 
well  earned  rest  the  fruits  of  his  former  toil.  He  was  born  in  Andrew  county,  Mis- 
souri, in  1845,  a  son  of  John  and  Catherine  (Von  Doran)  Wiseman,  the  former  a  native 
of  Kentucky,  while  the  latter  came  of  German  parentage.  In  an  early  day  John  Wise- 
man removed  from  Kentucky  to  Indiana  and  later  to  Missouri  and  in  1852,  accom- 
panied by  his  family,  he  crossed  the  plains  with  ox  team  and  wagon,  arriving  in  Oregon 
in  the  fall  of  that  year.  He  located  at  Brownsville,  where  he  took  up  a  donation  claim 
of  six  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  rich  prairie  land  and  at  once  began  the  development 
and  improvement  of  that  place,  upon  which  he  spent  a  few  years,  transforming  it  into 
a  highly  cultivated  farm  on  which  he  erected  a  residence  and  made  all  modern  improve- 
ments.    His   remaining  days   were   spent   residing   with   his   children. 

John  W.  Wiseman  was  but  seven  years  of  age  when  the  family  crossed  the  plains 
and  the  mountains  to  become  residents  of  the  northwest.  He  was  educated  in  the 
schools  of  Brownsville  and  at  the  age  of  fourteen  years  entered  the  employ  of  a  farmer 
in  that  vicinity  with  whom  he  remained  for  three  years.  He  saved  his  earnings  dur- 
ing this  period  and  then  began  buying  and  selling  stock  on  his  own  account  in  a  small 
way.  He  prospered  in  the  undertaking  and  continued  in  the  business  for  several 
years. 

It  was  in  1871  that  Mr.  Wiseman  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Bettie  Jane 
Barton,  a  daughter  of  Benjamin  R.  and  Rebecca  Jane  (McClung)  Barton,  the  former 
a  native  of  North  Carolina,  while  the  latter  was  born  in  Ohio.  Both  were  taken  to 
Iowa  by  their  respective  parents  in  an  early  day.  In  1853  they  crossed  the  plains,  ar- 
riving in  Oregon  in  the  fall  of  that  year.  They  first  settled  in  Lane  county,  in  Camp 
Creek  valley,  where  Mr.  Barton  engaged  in  agricultural  pursuits  and  from  there  to 
Brownsville,  Linn  county,  where  he  farmed  a  number  of  years.  In  later  years  he 
removed   to   Colfax,  Washington,   where   he  and   his   wife   spent   their   remaining   days. 

It  was  in  1871,  the  year  of  his  marriage,  that  Mr.  Wiseman  went  into  the  Walla 
Walla  country  where  he  engaged  in  farming  and  stock  raising  until  1875.  He  then  dis- 
posed of  his  interests  there  and  took  up  his  abode  in  Whitman  county.  Washington, 
where  he  secured  a  homestead  and  preemption  claim.  He  also  bought  adjoining  tracts 
of  land  from  time  to  time  as  his  financial  resources  increased  until  his  holdings  com- 
prised more  than  twelve  hundred  acres  of  rich  agricultural  land  which  he  greatly 
improved,  bringing  his  fields  under  a  high  state  of  cultivation  and  gathering  there- 
from substantial  harvests  annually.  Year  by  year  he  tilled  the  soil,  producing  large 
crops  and  he  continued  to  reside  on  and  operate  this  land  for  more  than  thirty-eight 
years.  In  the  meantime,  however,  he  sold  a  part  of  the  land  but  he  still  owns  five 
hundred  and  twenty-five  acres  which  is  cultivated  under  his  supervision,  his  son  being 
in  charge  of  the  property. 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  165 

Mr.  Wiseman  has  often  been  solicited  to  become  a  candidate  for  oflSce  but  has  usu- 
ally refused.  On  one  occasion  his  friends  wanted  him  to  accept  the  nomination  for 
the  state  legislature  but  he  also  refused  this.  He  has  been  a  stanch  republican  through- 
out his  entire  life,  giving  unfaltering  allegiance  to  the  party. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wiseman  have  been  born  four  children:  Dora,  now  the  wife  of 
A.  C.  Warner,  a  real  estate  dealer  of  Seattle,  Washington;  Edith,  the  wife  of  W.  E. 
Vaughn  of  Sacramento,  California;  Effie  H.,  who  passed  away  in  April,  1915,  was  the 
wife  of  J.  F.  Derry  of  New  York  city;  and  Fay  Rialto,  who  lives  on  his  father's  farm, 
which  he  is  now  cultivating.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wiseman  are  members  of  the  United 
Artisans  and  lifelong  members  of  the  Methodist  church.  They  now  occupy  a  pleasant 
and  attractive  home  in  Portland  and  are  enjoying  a  well  earned  rest,  for  the  success 
which  Mr.  Wiseman  achieved  as  a  ranchman  and  farmer  now  enables  him  to  enjoy 
all  of  the  comforts  and  some  of  the  luxuries  of  life  without  further  recourse  to  labor. 


SETH  BURKE  MASSEY,  D.  D.  S. 

Dr.  Seth  Burke  Massey,  engaged  in  active  practice  at  The  Dalles,  has  demonstrated 
his  ability  in  the  line  of  his  chosen  profession  and  has  given  evidence  of  that  highly 
developed  mechanical  skill  which  must  unite  with  a  knowledge  of  scientific  principles 
to  bring  success  to  the  dentist.  While  one  of  the  younger  men  in  this  calling,  he  has 
gained  a  professional  position  and  reputation  that  many  a  dentist  of  twice  his  years 
might  well  envy.  He  was  born  at  Brooks,  Oregon,  in  1S91,  his  parents  being  J.  N.  and 
Elizabeth  (Jones)  Massey,  who  were  representatives  of  pioneer  families  of  this  state. 
The  Masseys  came  to  Oregon  from  Kentucky  when  the  father  of  Dr.  Massey  was  but  a 
small  boy,  the  family  home  being  established  in  Benton  county.  Even  prior  to  that 
time  the  Jones  family  had  arrived  in  this  state.  The  great-grandfather  of  Dr.  Massey 
in  the  Jones  line  had  been  a  citizen  of  prominence  in  this  section  of  the  northwest 
even  before  Oregon  had  entered  upon  existence  as  a  territory. 

Dr.  Massey  was  educated  in  the  graded  schools  of  Brooks  and  In  private  schools 
at  Salem,  Oregon.  He  initiated  his  business  career  as  a  clerk  in  a  bank  and  afterwards 
pursued  a  course  of  study  in  the  North  Pacific  Dental  College  of  Portland,  from  which 
he  was  graduated  in  1916  with  the  D.  D.  S.  degree.  He  then  practiced  his  profession 
in  the  City  of  Roses  for  six  months,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he  removed  to  The 
Dalles,  taking  up  his  abode  in  the  latter  city  in  January,  1917.  Like  many  other 
young  men  Dr.  Massey  closed  his  office  and  offered  his  services  to  the  government  upon 
America's  entrance  into  the  World  war.  He  was  sent  to  Camp  Lewis,  where  he  was 
on  active  duty  for  fourteen  months  and  was  then  discharged.  When  the  country  no 
longer  needed  his  aid  Dr.  Massey  returned  to  his  office  at  The  Dalles  and  resumed  his 
practice,  having  in  the  meantime  been  a  first  lieutenant  in  the  OflScers  Reserve  Corps, 
in  the  dental  department  of  the  United  States  army. 

In  1919  Dr.  Massey  was  married  to  Miss  Margaret  Barry,  daughter  of  a  pioneer 
family  of  Washington,  and  he  and  his  wife  are  highly  esteemed  in  the  city  in  which 
they  make  their  home.  During  his  short  connection  with  the  practice  of  dentistry 
at  The  Dalles  he  has  won  an  enviable  reputation  as  one  who  has  mastered  the  scientific 
principles  back  of  his  work  and  who  seems  to  have  before  him  a  future  that  will  be 
well  worth  watching.  He  keeps  in  touch  with  the  trend  of  modern  professional  thought 
by  wide  reading  and  investigation  and  his  understanding  of  modern  discoveries  and 
processes  constitutes  one  of  the  basic  elements  in  his  growing  success. 


FRED  T.  GEORGE. 


Fred  T.  George,  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business  in  Echo,  Umatilla  county,  was 
born  at  Mt.  'Vernon,  Knox  county,  Ohio,  on  the  19th  of  September,  1876,  a  son  of 
Thomas  O.  and  Dora    (Hardesty)    George. 

When  thirteen  years  of  age  Fred  T.  George  came  west  and  located  in  Gilliam 
county,  Oregon,  where  he  engaged  in  cow  punching  for  twelve  years.  He  was  an  in- 
dustrious lad,  and  being  of  an  ambitious  nature  soon  worked  up  to  the  position  of 
general  manager,  looking  after  the  shipping  of  the  stock.  During  this  period  he  bought 
and  sold  stock  on  his  own  account  and  soon  became  known  as  one  of  the  largest  ship- 


166  HISTORY  OP  OREGON 

pers  of  cattle  in  that  district.  The  first  venture  of  Mr.  George  into  the  mercantile  world 
was  made  in  connection  with  Walter  Compton,  in  the  conduct  of  a  dry  goods  store  at 
Arlington.  For  one  year  he  remained  in  that  connection  and  then  bought  out  his 
partner,  conducting  the  entire  business  until  1906.  In  this  year  he  removed  to  Echo 
and  became  a  partner  in  the  George  and  Miller  Company  and  two  years  later,  in  the 
spring  of  1908,  he  bought  the  business  which  he  is  now  conducting.  In  the  fall  of 
1910  he  purchased  the  building  and  his  general  store  is  one  of  the  largest  and  best  in 
the  county.  He  endeavors  to  give  his  customers  the  best  quality  of  goods  at  fair  prices 
and  he  firmly  believes  that  satisfied  customers  are  the  best  advertisement.  As  a  rep- 
resentative of  one  of  Echo's  most  important  business  interests  it  stands  to  reason  that 
Mr.  George  would  take  a  keen  interest  in  the  civic  affairs  of  the  community.  He  is 
now  serving  as  president  of  the  Commercial  Club,  is  a  member  of  the  school  board,  and 
likewise  of  the  city  council. 

In  1899  Mr.  George  was  married  to  Miss  Fay  Wood,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Addie 
Wood,  and  she  died  in  the  fall  of  1906,  at  Pendleton.  On  the  1st  of  January,  190S, 
Mr.  George  was  again  married.  Miss  Marian  King,  of  Michigan,  becoming  his  wife. 
Two  children  have  been  born  to  the  second  union:   Marion  and  Lucile. 

Fraternally  Mr.  George  is  an  Elk  and  a  member  of  the  Maccabees.  He  gives  his 
allegiance  to  the  republican  party,  in  the  activities  of  which  he  takes  a  keen  interest. 
The  early  life  of  Mr.  George  was  indeed  one  of  hardship  but  as  the  years  passed  he 
gradually  worked  his  way  upward  and  his  course  proves  that  upon  the  foundation  of 
industry  and  indefatigable  energy  success  may  be  built. 


GENERAL  CHARLES  F.  BEEBE. 

In  every  relation  of  life  General  Charles  F.  Beebe  has  played  well  his  part  and 
the  results  achieved  have  been  a  vital  force  in  shaping  the  history  of  Portland.  There 
have  been  no  spectacular  phases  in  his  life,  but  keen  discernment  and  sagacity  have 
combined  with  energy  and  determination  to  make  his  work  a  very  important  element 
in  molding  the  development  of  Portland  along  many  lines:  and  any  resident,  if  asked 
for  a  list  of  the  leading  citizens,  would  place  thereon  the  name  of  General  Charles  F. 
Beebe. 

New  England  blood  flows  in  his  veins.  During  that  period  when  the  first  colonies 
were  being  established  along  the  Atlantic  coast  representatives  of  the  name  came  from 
England  to  the  new  world.  Silas  Beebe,  the  grandfather  of  the  General,  was  born  in 
Connecticut  and  for  years  was  master  of  sailing  craft,  building  and  owning  a  number 
of  vessels  which  sailed  from  Mystic.  It  was  there  that  Charles  E.  Beebe,  the  General's 
father,  was  born  and  reared,  but  in  early  manhood  he  went  to  New  York  city,  prompted 
by  a  laudable  ambition  that  caused  him  to  seek  broader  opportunities  than  the  small 
town  afforded.  For  a  half  century,  beginning  in  1840.  he  was  classed  with  the  leading 
and  prosperous  tea  merchants  and  importers  of  America's  metropolis,  where  he  con- 
ducted his  business  affairs  under  the  style  of  Beebe  &  Brother.  His  home  life  had  its 
establishment  in  his  marriage  to  Miss  Jane  B.  Wade,  who  was  born  in  Springfield, 
New  Jersey,  and  passed  away  in  1S91.  She  was  a  daughter  of  Elias  Wade,  also  a  native 
of  New  Jersey,  who  conducted  a  wholesale  grocery  business  until  1865  and  then 
became  managing  partner  in  the  large  importing  and  shipping  house  of  Grinnell,  Min- 
turn  &  Company  of  New  York,  which  business  relation  he  maintained  to  the  time  of 
his  death  in  1878.  To  the  marriage  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  E.  Beebe  were  born  four 
children,  three  of  whom  reached  maturity.  William  W.,  a  graduate  of  Yale  Univer- 
sity of  the  class  of  1873,  became  an  attorney  of  New  York  city  and  afterward  removed 
to  Colorado  Springs,  Colorado,  where  his  death  occurred.  Alfred  L.  was  graduated 
from  the  Columbia  School  of  Mines  in  New  York  city  and  for  a  number  of  years  was 
assistant  chemist  of  the  New  York  board  of  health.  In  1S9S  he  came  to  Portland,  where 
he  resided  for  about  ten  years.     He  died  in  New  London,  Connecticut,  June  26,  1914. 

The  other  member  of  the  family  is  General  Beebe,  whose  youthful  days  were 
passed  in  New  York  city,  where  his  birth  occurred.  In  1865  he  was  graduated  from 
the  Flushing  Institute  on  Long  Island  and  became  the  active  assistant  of  his  father  in 
the  tea  importing  business  and  eventually  was  admitted  to  a  partnership  in  the  firm, 
continuing  with  the  house  until  1879,  when  he  disposed  of  his  interests  and  turned 
his  attention  to  the  cotton  brokerage  business  as  a  partner  of  Henry  M.  Evans,  under 
the  firm  style  of  Evans  &  Beebe.     After  four  years  Mr.  Beebe  joined  with  his  brother- 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  167 

in-law,  A.  M.  Sutton,  in  establishing  an  agency  at  Portland  tor  the  firm  of  Sutton  & 
Company  of  New  York.  On  the  1st  of  February,  1884,  he  opened  an  agency  for  Sut- 
ton &  Company  of  New  York  at  No.  16  North  Front  street,  and  when  the  business 
was  well  established,  Mr.  Sutton,  in  July,  1884,  went  to  San  Francisco,  the  two  acting 
as  western  agents  for  the  Sutton  &  Company  Dispatch  Line  of  Clipper  Ships  around 
Cape  Horn  from  New  York  and  Philadelphia.  In  connection  with  the  Portland  agency 
a  general  ship-chandlery  business  was  carried  on  and  in  that  line  General  Beebe  con- 
tinued until  1S96,  when  he  bought  the  interest  of  Mr.  Sutton  and  incorporated  the  busi- 
ness under,  the  name  of  the  Charles  F.  Beebe  Company.  He  remained  the  president 
of  the  business  for  a  decade  and  then  withdrew  to  take  up  the  active  management 
of  important  interests  in  connection  with  the  manufacture  of  lime  and  gypsum  products 
in  eastern  Oregon,  in  which  enterprise  he  was  associated  with  Charles  E.  Ladd.  In 
later  years  he  has  concentrated  his  efforts  and  attention  upon  the  insurance  business 
and  still  remains  an  honored  and  valued  resident  of  Portland,  where  for  thirty-five 
years  he  has  made  his  home,  being  closely  associated  with  the  development  and  upbuild- 
ing of  the  city,  not  alone  along  material  lines  but  in  many  other  connections  as  well. 

General  Beebe  is  prominently  known  as  a  representative  of  the  National  Guard. 
His  military  activity  began  on  the  14th  of  February,  1871,  when  he  joined  Company  H 
of  the  Seventh  New  York  Regiment,  from  which  he  was  honorably  discharged  in  Novem- 
ber, 1878,  and  appointed  aid-de-camp  with  the  rank  of  first  lieutenant  on  the  staff 
of  Brigadier  General  J.  M.  Varian,  commander  of  the  Second  Brigade  of  the  New 
York  National  Guard.  Various  promotions  followed  until  he  became  brigade  quarter- 
master with  the  rank  of  captain,  and  he  was  retained  in  that  position  when  Brigadier 
General  Louis  Fitzgerald  became  the  successor  of  General  Varian  as  commander  of 
the  brigade.  Captain  Beebe  was  soon  afterward  appointed  inspector  of  rifle  practice 
with  the  rank  of  major  and  so  served  until  he  resigned  in  the  fall  of  1882.  Later  he 
was  appointed  assistant  in  the  department  of  rifle  practice  with  the  rank  of  major 
under  General  Charles  F.  Robbins,  Inspector  General  of  Rifle  Practice  of  the  State  of  New 
York,  on  the  general  staff,  and  so  continued  until  he  tendered  his  resignation,  prep- 
aratory to  his  removal  to  Oregon. 

In  the  spring  of  1886  the  National  Guard  of  Oregon  was  reorganized  and  General 
Beebe  became  second  lieutenant  when  Company  K  was  formed  in  Portland.  He  was 
soon  advanced  to  first  lieutenant  and  on  the  permanent  organization  of  the  company 
was  elected  captain.  In  July.  1887,  he  was  chosen  colonel  of  the  First  Regiment  and 
was  reelected  at  Milton,  Oregon,  in  1891.  On  the  22d  of  February,  1895,  he  was  ap- 
pointed and  commissioned  brigadier  general  in  command  of  the  Oregon  troops  by  Gov- 
ernor William  P.  Lord  and  four  years  later  was  reappointed  by  Governor  T.  T.  Geer. 
He  bent  every  energy  toward  bringing  the  Oregon  National  Guard  to  a  high  standard 
of  efficiency  and  deserves  and  receives  much  credit  for  his  thorough  work  in  this 
connection.  He  is  a  life  member  of  the  Seventh  New  York  Regiment  Veteran  Associa- 
tion and  it  was  in  the  Empire  state  that  he  gained  the  military  training  which  has 
enabled  him  to  do  so  much  for  the  Oregon  Guard,  placing  it  on  a  rank  in  equipment 
and  efficiency  with  the  best  military  organizations  of  other  states.  From  the  1st  of 
September,  1918,  until  the  31st  of  March,  1919,  he  was  adjutant  general  of  Oregon.  It 
was  characteristic  of  him  that  he  concentrated  all  effort  possible  upon  the  support  of 
his  country  during  the  war  period,  taking  part  in  all  the  bond  drives,  serving  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  State  Council  of  Defense  and  acting  as  one  of  the  Four-Minute  men. 

While  residing  in  New  York  city  General  Beebe  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Emma  Bowne,  who  was  born  at  Flushing,  Long  Island,  and  was  educated  in  Miss 
Porter's  school  at  Farmington,  New  York.  She  was  a  daughter  of  Simon  R.  Bowne,  who 
belonged  to  a  prominent  Quaker  family  of  Flushing.  General  and  Mrs.  Beebe  became 
the  parents  of  three  sons:  Walter  Bowne,  now  president  of  the  Northwest  Steel  Com- 
pany; and  Gerald  E.  and  Kenneth,  who  became  associated  with  their  father  in  business. 
The  insurance  interests  of  the  firm  are  conducted  under  the  name  of  Beebe  &  Black. 
Incorporated,   with   General   Beebe  as   the   vice   president. 

In  his  political  views  General  Beebe  has  always  been  a  stanch  republican  and  in 
1903  served  on  the  executive  board  under  appointment  of  Mayor  Williams  and  because 
of  his  thorough  military  training  was  made  a  member  of  the  committee  having  super- 
vision over  the  police  department.  He  has  been  a  stalwart  advocate  of  many  projects 
promoted  by  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  for  the  benefit  and  upbuilding  of  Portland  and 
for  one  term  served  as  president  of  the  Chamber,  for  two  terms  as  vice  president 
and  also  as  a  member  of  the  board  of  trustees.  He  was  twice  honored  with  the  presi- 
dency of  the  Commercial  Club  and  is  identified  with  the  Civic  League  and  the  Ad  Club. 


168  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

He  is  equally  well  known  and  popular  In  the  Arlington  Club  and  the  Multnomah  Club 
and  belongs  to  the  Auki  Lang  Syne  Society  of  Portland.  His  identification  with  the  Sons 
of  the  American  Revolution  indicates  his  descent  from  ancestors  who  served  in  the  war 
for  independence.  He  attends  the  Episcopal  church!  and  throughout  his  life  has  held 
to  high  ideals  in  his  relations  with  his  fellowmen,  in  business  affairs  and  in  his  con- 
nection with  public  interests.  His  labors  have  indeed  been  an  element  in  Portland's 
progress  and  improvement  and  especially  upon  the  military  history  of  the  state  his  name 
is  written  large.  Not  to  know  General  Beebe  personally  or  by  reputation  in  Portland 
is  to  argue  one's  self  unknown. 


JOHN  J.   JENNINGS. 


Coming  to  Portland  in  1S82.  before  the  advent  of  the  railroad,  John  J.  Jennings 
has  lived  to  witness  great  changes  here  as  the  work  of  development  and  upbuilding 
has  been  carried  forward,  and  in  the  conduct  of  an  extensive  and  remunerative  real 
estate  business  he  has  contributed  in  substantial  measure  to  the  advancement  and 
improvement  of  the  city  which  has  more  than  justified  his  faith  in  its  future.  A 
native  of  England  Mr.  Jennings  was  born  in  Lancashire,  near  Liverpool,  in  1852,  a 
son  of  John  and  Margaret  (Connelly)  Jennings  and  in  the  district  schools  of  his 
native  city  he  pursued  his  education.  When  fifteen  years  of  age  he  crossed  the  Atlantic 
alone,  going  to  Albany,  New  York,  where  relatives  of  the  family  resided  and  later 
was  joined  by  his  parents.  After  completing  a  commercial  course  in  Pain's  Business 
College  he  secured  work  in  the  shops  of  the  Hudson  River  Railroad  (now  the 
New  York  Central  Railroad),  where  his  faithfulness  and  devotion  to  duty  -won  him' 
promotion  to  the  positions  of  foreman  and  engineer.  He  served  in  the  latter  capacity 
for    four   years,    his    run    being   between    Albany    and    New    York    city. 

In  1882  Mr.  Jennings  left  the  east  and  came  to  Oregon,  hoping  that  the  mild 
climate  of  this  section  of  the  country  would  prove  beneficial  to  his  health,  which  had 
become  somewhat  impaired.  When  he  arrived  in  this  state  he  weighed  but  one 
hundred  and  twenty-nine  pounds,  but  since  coming  west  has  enjoyed  splendid  health, 
being  now  a  most  robust  man  of  vigorous  constitution.  He  is  familiar  with  all  of 
the  conditions  of  pioneer  life,  for  when  he  came  to  Oregon  the  railroads  had  not  yet 
been  constructed  through  to  the  coast  and  the  only  means  of  transportation  was 
by  overland  teams  or  the  water  route  from  San  Francisco.  He  made  use  of  the 
latter  method  of  travel  and  engaged  in  business  in  this  city  as  a  dealer  in  fish  and 
poultry,  opening  a  market  at  the  corner  of  Fifth  and  Washington  streets,  on  the 
present  site  of  the  large  mercantile  establishment  of  Lipman  &  Wolfe.  There  he 
remained  for  five  years  and  then  sold  out  to  enter  the  cigar  and  confectionery 
business,  establishing  a  store  opposite  the  old  post  office,  where  the  dry  goods  house 
of  Meier  &  Frank  is  now  located.  Five  years  later  he  disposed  of  this  interest  and 
engaged  in  the  real  estate  business,  but  during  the  panic  of  1893  there  was  little 
activity  in  city  real  estate  and  Mr.  Jennings  turned  his  attention  to  farm  property 
and  other  exchanges,  becoming  a  pioneer  in  that  line.  Coming  to  this  city  when 
its  population  was  but  seventeen  thousand  five  hundred  he  has  ever  maintained  an 
abiding  faith  in  its  future  greatness  and  has  lived  to  see  his  faith  amply  justified, 
for  it  is  now  a  city  with  more  than  a  quarter  of  a  million  inhabitants  and  is  con- 
stantly extending  its  trade  interests,  its  growth  being  steady,  healthful  and  continuous. 
By  close  application,  determined  purpose  and  indefatigable  energy  he  has  built  up  a 
large  and  remunerative  business  and  is  the  owner  of  some  of  the  most  valuable  prop- 
erty in  the  city.  He  has  negotiated  many  important  realty  transfers,  is  thoroughly 
conversant  concerning  property  values  here  and  the  name  of  Jennings  &  Company  has 
long  been  a  synonym  for  integrity,  reliability  and  progressiveness  in  real  estate  circles 
of  Portland. 

In  New  York  city,  on  the  10th  of  January,  1875,  John  J.  Jennings  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Isabella  A.  Malarkey,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Isabella  Malarkey 
of  that  city,  where  the  father  was  long  prominent  in  business  circles  as  the  owner 
of  a  quarry,  furnishing  the  marble  for  the  subtreasury  building  on  Wall  street,  the 
scene  of  the  late  bomb  explosion.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jennings  were  born  eight  chil- 
dren, of  whom  six  are  living,  namely:  John  A.,  forty-four  years  of  age,  who  is  asso- 
ciated with  his  father  in  the  conduct  of  the  real  estate  business  of  Jennings  & 
Company;    Charles   V.,   forty-two   years   of   age,   who   is   the   owner   of   the   Parcel   Post 


JOHN   J.    JENNINGS 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  171 

Delivery  Company;  Ida,  aged  thirty-eight,  who  married  Raymond  G.  Manion,  both 
now  following  the  profession  of  acting;  Isabella,  the  wife  of  George  P.  Kennedy 
who  is  engaged  in  the  printing  business  at  Aberdeen,  Washington;  Violet  D.,  for- 
merly the  widow  of  R.  R.  Sleight,  who  was  just  entering  the  army  when  he  became 
a  victim  of  the  influenza  epidemic  and  passed  away  in  September,  1918.  She  has 
since  become  the  wife  of  Kirby  H.  Kittoe  of  Dallas,  Texas;  and  Florence  M.,  the  wife 
of  Robert  Wendell  Bell  who  served  for  one  year  in  France  as  a  lieutenant  in  the  avia- 
tion forces  and   is  now  engaged   in  the  automobile  business  at  Dallas,  Texas. 

In  his  religious  views  Mr.  Jennings  leans  toward  the  Catholic  faith  but  frequently 
attends  the  Protestant  churches  and  his  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican 
party.  He  has  had  no  political  aspirations  and  the  only  office  which  he  has  ever 
held  was  that  of  councilman,  which  he  filled  prior  to  the  inauguration  of  the  commis- 
sion form  of  government.  He  has  frequently  been  importuned  by  his  friends  to 
become  a  candidate  for  the  office  of  mayor,  but  has  declined,  feeling  that  his  exten- 
sive business  interests  require  his  undivided  time  and  attention.  He  is  identified  with 
the  Republican  Club,  the  Press  Club  and  Auld  Lang  Syne,  the  latter  organization 
limiting  its  membership  to  those  who  have  resided  in  Portland  prior  to  the  year 
1890.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Elks  and  the  Knights  of  Columbus.  He  is  a  member 
of  the  Realty  &  Realtors  Association  and  is  likewise  connected  with  the  Chamber 
cf  Commerce  whose  well  devised  plans  for  the  upbuilding  and  improvement  of  the 
city  he  heartily  indorses.  Just  before  the  outbreak  of  the  World  war  Mr.  Jennings 
and  his  family  visited  England^  leaving  the  country  shortly  before  the  declaration 
of  hostilities.  He  is  a  very  pleasant  and  approachable  gentleman,  beaming  over 
with  good  humor  and  taking  a  keen  interest  in  everything  that  has  for  its  object 
the  betterment  of  the  community.  He  is  numbered  among  the  honored  pioneers  of 
Portland,  having  taken  up  his  residence  in  this  city  nearly  forty  years  ago  and  he 
has  well  used  these  years,  not  only  to  promote  his  own  prosperity  but  to  further  the 
general  development  and  progress  of  his  community  and  district.  His  reminiscences 
of  the  early  days  are  most  interesting.  At  the  time  of  his  arrival  in  the  state  fish 
and  game  were  so  plentiful  that  they  could  be  purchased  for  a  mere  pittance  and 
wild  deer  shipped  into  the  city  would  not  bring  enough  to  pay  the  freight  charges. 
His  has  been  a  busy,  active  and  useful  life,  fraught  with  honorable  purpose  and 
accomplishment  and  he  can  look  back  over  the  past  without  regret  and  forward 
to   the  future  without   fear. 


EDMUND   BURKE   TONGUE. 


With  a  name  to  live  up  to  and  a  name  to  make,  Edmund  Burke  Tongue  has  achieved 
noteworthy  success  in  both  respects.  He  is  the  son  of  Thomas  H.  and  Emily  (Eagleton) 
Tongue.  His  father.  Hon.  Thomas  H.  Tongue,  was  a  pioneer  of  1859  who  as  a  lawyer 
and  statesman  has  written  his  name  indelibly  upon  the  records  of  the  state  of  Oregon. 
His  services  as  state  senator  and  his  legal  proficiency  are  too  well  known  to  the  people 
of  Oregon  to  need  comment  here.  In  1896  he  was  sent  to  Congress  and  was  reelected 
in  1S98,  in  1900  and  in  1902.  His  ability  was  recognized  in  the  halls  of  government 
and  the  sorrow  expressed  at  his  death  in  1903  by  all  the  people  of  Oregon  found  an 
echo  in  Washington,  D.  C. 

E.  B.  Tongue  was  educated  in  the  primary  schools  of  Hillsboro,  at  the  University 
of  Oregon  and  at  Pacific  University.  Graduating  in  1895  with  the  degree  of  A.  M. 
he  took  up  the  study  of  law  in  his  father's  office  and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1897, 
when  he  became  associated  with  his  father  under  the  firm  name  of  Thomas  H.  and  E.  B. 
Tongue.  This  partnership  continued  until  1903  when  it  was  dissolved  by  the  death  of 
Hon.  Thomas  H.  Tongue.  In  1908  Mr.  Tongue  was  elected  district  attorney  of  the 
fifth  judicial  district  made  up  of  Clackamas,  Columbia,  Clatsop  and  Washington  counties 
and  he  served  in  that  capacity  until  the  enactment  of  a  law  creating  the  office  of  dis- 
trict attorney  for  each  county.  He  was  then  elected  to  serve  in  the  same  office  in  Wash- 
ington county  and  is  filling  that  position  at  the  present  time.  While  public  affairs 
have  always  held  the  utmost  interest  for  Mr.  Tongue  he  has  never  sought  political 
prominence.  It  is  conceded  that  he  could  have  any  office  within  the  gift  of  the  people, 
but  he  is  a  lawyer  first,  last  and  all  the  time.  He  is  regarded  by  the  bench  and  bar 
as  one  of  the  best  lawyers  in  Oregon  and  the  leading  attorney  in  his  section  of  the 
state. 


172  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

Mr.  Tongue  was  married  in  1909  to  Maude  Agnes  Shannon,  daughter  of  J.  T. 
Shannon  of  Forest  Grove.  They  have  two  children,  Edmund  Burke,  Jr.,  and  Robert 
Shannon.     The  family  make  their  home  in  Hillsboro. 

Mr.  Tongue  is  a  thirty-second  degree  Mason,  a  Noble  of  the  Mystic  Shrine,  an  Elk 
and  a  Knight  of  Pythias.  He  Is  a  member  of  the  Multnomah  Athletic  Club  and  the 
Portland  Hunt  Club.  As  in  every  other  project  for  the  betterment  of  his  town,  state 
and  country,  Mr.  Tongue  took  a  prominent  part  in  war  drives  and  activities.  He 
has  inherited  his  father's  marked  ability  and  is  a  forceful  speaker  with  nothing  of  the 
bombast  characteristic  of  some  representatives  of  the  profession.  Taken  all  in  all 
he  is  a  worthy  son  of  a  distinguished  sire. 


GLEN  OWEN  HENDRICKS. 


Glen  Owen  Hendricks  spent  the  latter  part  of  his  life  in  Portland,  where  he  passed 
away  on  the  17th  of  April,  1919.  For  a  number  of  years  before,  however,  he  had 
been  identified  with  fruit  raising  in  the  northwest.  He  was  born  near  Dallas,  Oregon, 
in  1857,  a  son  of  Robert  J.  and  Mary  Jane  (Sherwood)  Hendricks  who  came  across  the 
plains  with  ox  team  and  wagon  at  an  early  day.  Arriving  in  Oregon  they  settled  on  a 
farm  near  Dallas  and  afterward  removed  to  Walla  Walla,  Washington.  At  a  later 
period,  however,  they  returned  to  this  state,  taking  up  their  abode  in  Douglas  county 
where  the  father  purchased  a  large  tract  of  land  which  he  developed  into  a  good 
home  and  thereon  spent  his  remaining  days,  becoming  prominently  identified  with  the 
upbuilding  and  improvement  of  that  section  of  the  state. 

Glen  O.  Hendricks  acquired  his  early  education  in  the  district  schools  and  afterward 
continued  his  studies  at  Oakland,  Oregon,  and  also  in  the  University  of  Oregon.  He  later 
took  up  the  profession  of  school  teaching  which  he  followed  for  several  years  and  during 
that  period  carefully  saved  his  earnings  until  his  industry  and  economy  enabled  him 
to  start  out  in  the  live  stock  business  on  his  own  account  in  eastern  Oregon.  He 
operated  in  Harney  county  and  successfully  followed  the  business  for  several  years, 
continuing  active  along  that  line  until  1913  when  he  sold  out  and  removed  to  Washing- 
ton. There  he  purchased  a  fine  fruit  ranch,  but  owing  to  failing  health  he  was  forced 
to  retire  from  active  business  and  in  1917  took  up  his  abode  in  Portland  where  he 
passed  away  on  the  17th  of  April,  1919. 

Mr.  Hendricks  was  married  in  1882  to  Miss  Mary  Hattie  Markham,  a  daughter 
of  J.  S.  and  Mary  Jane  Markham,  the  former  a  native  of  Missouri  and  the  latter  of 
Indiana.  In  1875  Mr.  Markham  came  to  Oregon  with  his  family  and  resided  in  this 
state  until  1883,  when  he  removed  with  the  members  of  his  household  to  Washing- 
ton where  he  still  resides  at  the  advanced  age  of  eighty-six  years.  His  wife,  however, 
passed  away  April  29,  1920,  at  the  age  of  eighty  years.  Seven  children  were  born  to 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hendricks,  namely:  Charles  Francis,  who  is  living  at  Puyallup,  Wash- 
ington; Vivian,  Viola,  the  wife  of  W.  E.  Gray,  of  Emmett.  Idaho;  Vera  Antonia,  the 
deceased  wife  of  H.  H.  Gay,  of  Centralia,  Washington;  Bessie,  who  died  in  infancy; 
Lillian  Lucretia,  a  nurse  who  resides  at  home;  Mary  Hattie,  who  was  graduated  from 
the  Normal  School  in  1917  and  is  now  teaching;  and  Glen  Owen,  Jr.,  who  resides  in 
Portland. 

Mr.  Hendricks  was  a  republican  in  his  political  views  and  his  religious  faith  was 
indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  Christian  church.  His  life  was  guided  by  high 
and  honorable  principles  and  the  sterling  worth  of  his  character  was  acknowledged 
by  all  with  whom  he  came  into  contact.  He  was  a  reliable  and  progressive  business 
man  and  a  faithful  friend  and  those  who  knew  him  entertained  for  him  warm  regard. 


JASPER  NEWTON  BURGESS. 

For  many  years  Jasper  Newton  Burgess,  now  deceased,  was  prominent  in  the  sheep, 
stock  raising  and  banking  circles  of  Pendleton,  Umatilla  county.  He  was  a  native  son 
of  Oregon,  born  in  Douglas  county  on  the  5th  of  March,  1872,  a  son  of  Thomas  and 
Ellen  (Smith)  Burgess.  The  father  was  a  native  of  Columbus,  Ohio,  while  the  mother 
was  born  in  Oregon,  in  which  state  she  is  now  residing,  making  her  home  in  The 
Dalles.     When   a  young  man   Thomas   Burgess   set   out   for   the   west   and   making   the 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  173 

journey  around  the  Panama  canal  arrived  in  California,  where  he  remained  for  some 
time.  He  then  removed  to  Oregon,  settling  in  Douglas  county,  and  there  operated  land 
for  some  time.  His  marriage  occurred  during  his  residence  in  that  county.  In  1874 
he  moved  to  Wasco  county,  where  he  purchased  a  ranch  and  engaged  in  the  cattle 
business  for  a  number  of  years.  About  1902  he  removed  to  The  Dalles,  where  he 
retired,  and  there  his  death  occurred.     Throughout  his  life  he  was  a  stanch  democrat. 

The  boyhood  of  Jasper  Newton  Burgess  was  spent  on  his  father's  farm  in  Wasco 
county,  known  as  Bake  Oven,  and  he  assisted  in  the  farm  work  until  1896  when  he 
bought  a  ranch  at  Antelope,  Oregon,  moving  thereon  in  1897  with  his  wife.  He  operated 
this  in  connection  with  his  father's  ranch  until  1905,  when  he  removed  to  Pendleton 
and  purchased  the  Charles  Cunningham  ranch  consisting  of  about  nineteen  thousand 
acres.  He  organized  the  Cunningham  Sheep  and  Land  Company,  becoming  president 
and  manager,  and  operated  this  business  until  his  death,  which  occurred  as  the  result 
of  being  shot  by  a  robber  at  Claremont  Tavern,  on  the  21st  of  November,  1919,  at  the 
age  of  forty-eight  years.  Mr.  Burgess  was  prominent  in  the  political  circles  of  the 
county,  having  served  as  a  representative  in  the  state  legislature  from  Wasco  county 
from  1903  to  1907  and  he  was  elected  to  the  state  senate  and  served  from  1911  through 
1915.  He  belonged  to  the  National  Wool  Growers  Association,  serving  on  the  board  of 
directors,  and  he  was  president  of  the  State  Wool  Growers  Association.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  Highway  Commission  and  of  the  State  Live  Stock  Sanitary  Board, 
and  in  the  financial  circles  of  Pendleton  he  took  a  prominent  part  as  president  of  the 
Pilot  Rock  Bank  and  director  of  the  American  National  Bank   of  Pendleton. 

In  1S97  Mr.  Burgess  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  Ashby,  daughter  of  William  J.  and 
Nancy,  (Downing)  Ashby,  and  a  native  of  Umatilla  county,  Oregon.  Her  father  and 
mother  were  natives  of  Illinois  and  crossed  the  plains  when  children,  settling  in  Marion 
county,  Oregon.  There  they  were  married  and  later  removed  to  Umatilla  county,  where 
they  engaged  in  farming.  To  the  union,  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burgess  two  children  were 
born:  Ralph  Newton  and  Madeline,  both  at  home. 

On  reaching  man's  estate  Mr.  Burgess  became  a  stanch  supporter  of  the  republi- 
can party  and  his  fraternal  affiliations  were  with  the  Masons,  in  which  he  had  attained 
the  thirty-second  degree,  and  the  Benevolent  and  Protective  Order  of  Elks.  About 
three  years  before  his  death  Mr.  Burgess  built  a  fine  home  on  Jackson  street  and  there 
he  resided,  a  successful  and  representative  citizen.  His  death  came  as  a  severe  shock 
to  his  family  and  many  friends  and  left  a  void  in  the  community  which  it  will  not  be 
easy  to  fill. 


JESSE  STEARNS. 


Jesse  Stearns,  a  distinguished  attorney  of  Portland,  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  emi- 
nent authorities  on  irrigation  law  in  the  state  and  has  brought  to  a  successful  issue  many 
large  irrigation  projects,  thus  contributing  in  substantial  measure  to  the  development  of 
Oregon  along  agricultural  and  horticultural  lines.  He  has  been  equally  thorough  in 
his  study  of  other  branches  of  the  profession  and  his  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the 
law  has  won  for  him  a  large  and  representative  clientele.  Mr.  Stearns  is  a  native 
of  the  east.  He  was  born  in  Starksboro,  Vermont,  January  21,  1S59,  a  son  of  Ansel  L. 
Stearns,  also  a  native  of  that  place.  The  great-grandfather,  Jonathan  Stearns,  was  a 
soldier  in  the  Revolutionary  war  and  the  grandfather,  Theodore  H.  Stearns,  was  also 
a  native  of  the  Green  Mountain  state.  Ansel  L.  Stearns,  the  father,  was  born  in  1835 
and  throughout  his  active  life  followed  the  occupation  of  farming.  He  was  married 
in  Vermont  to  Julia  Farr,  also  a  native  of  that  state  and  there  his  death  occurred  in 
1887.     The  mother  survives  and  in  1906  took  up  her  residence  in  Portland. 

In  the  district  schools  of  Vermont  and  New  Hampshire  Jesse  Stearns  pursued  his 
early  education,  subsequently  becoming  a  student  in  Middlebury  College  of  Vermont, 
from  which  he  was  graduated  in  18S3  with  the  degree  of  A.  B.  He  then  entered  the 
office  of  Stewart  &  Wilds,  prominent  attorneys  of  Middlebury,  with  whom  he  read  law 
and  in  1886  was  admitted  to  the  Vermont  bar.  In  the  following  year  he  went  to 
New  York  city  and  in  18SS  was  there  admitted  to  the  bar,  later  becoming  a  partner 
in  the  firm  of  Gifford,  Stearns  and  Hobbs— an  association  which  was  maintained  for  a 
period  of  sixteen  years,  or  until  1903.  He  then  practiced  alone  for  about  two  years 
and  in  the  spring  of  1905  made  his  way  to  the  west,  taking  up  his  residence  in  Port- 
land and  in  1906  became  counsel  for  the  Deschutes  Irrigation  &  Power  Company.     In 


174  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

1907  he  was  admitted  to  the  Oregon  bar  and  in  that  year  opened  a  law  oiHce  in  this 
city,  where  lie  has  since  been  engaged  in  practice.  He  is  an  able  lawyer,  strong  in  argu- 
ment, logical  in  his  deductions  and  sound  in  his  reasoning,  while  in  the  application  of 
legal  principles  he  is  seldom,  if  ever,  at  fault.  Through  broad  study  he  has  gained  a 
comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  irrigation  laws  of  the  state  and  of  the  United  States 
and  is  regarded  as  an  authority  in  this  branch  of  jurisprudence,  having  brought  many 
large  irrigation  projects  to  a  successful  issue,  owing  to  his  indefatigable  industry  and 
perseverance.  In  business  circles  of  the  city  he  is  well  known  as  secretary  and  di- 
rector of  the  Central  Oregon  Irrigation  Company  and  as  a  director  of  the  Redmond 
(Ore.)  National  Bank  and  the  "Willamette  Boom  Company.  In  business  affairs  his 
judgment  is  sound  and  his  investments  have  been  judiciously  made.  His  record  has 
ever  been  characterized  by  absolute  honesty  and  integrity  and  he  is  earnest  and  con- 
scientious in  the  performance  of  his  professional  duties,  which  now  make  heavy  de- 
mand upon  his  time  and  attention.  He  is  a  man  of  superior  professional  attain- 
ments, well  qualified  successfully  to  conduct  the  Important  litigated  interests  intrusted 
to   his   care. 

On  the  27th  of  December,  1906,  Mr.  Stearns  was  united  in  marriage  to  Mary  P.  Hardy, 
the  ceremony  being  performed  at  Oshkosh,  Wisconsin.  By  a  former  marriage  he  has 
two  sons:  Noble  D.,  who  was  born  in  Vermont  in  1890  and  now  residing  in  Aberdeen, 
Washington;    and  Carroll  R.,  who  was  born  in   New  York  city  in   1895. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Stearns  is  a  republican.  He  is  an  earnest  and  active 
member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  his  social  nature  finds  expression  in  his  mem- 
bership in  the  Arlington,  University,  Waverly  Country  and  Press  Clubs.  In  religious 
matters  he  is  philanthropic  but  is  not  identified  with  any  denomination.  He  is  a 
lover  of  good  literature  and  spends  many  an  enjoyable  hour  with  his  favorite  authors 
and  his  chief  diversions  are  golf,  fishing  and  outdoor  exercise.  During  the  World 
war  he  served  as  a  member  of  the  legal  advisory  board  and  is  a  loyal,  public-spirited 
citizen  whose  influence  is  ever  on  the  side  of  advancement  and  improvement.  His  life 
has  at  all  times  measured  up  to  the  highest  standards  and  he  is  honored  and  respected 
for  his  sterling  worth  as  well  as  for  his  pronounced  professional  ability. 


HERMAN    J.    WINTERS. 


Oregon  numbers  among  her  native  sons,  Herman  J.  Winters,  who  as  proprietor 
of  a  jewelry  store  in  Klamath  Falls,  has  won  recognition  among  the  representative 
business  men  of  his  section  of  the  state.  He  was  born  in  Newberg.  this  state,  in 
June,  1877.  His  father,  Andrew  J.  Winters,  came  across  the  plains  with  his  parents 
when  but  six  years  of  age,  arriving  in  Oregon  in  1852,  and  his  wife  and  the  mother 
of  Herman  came  to  this  state  with  her  parents  in  1860.  They  spent  the  remainder 
of  their  lives  here  and  were  prominent  and  highly  respected  citizens  of  the  com- 
munities  in   which   they   resided. 

In  the  acquirement  of  an  education  Herman  J.  Winters  attended  the  district 
schools  in  the  vicinity  of  Newberg  and  later  went  to  Portland,  where  he  entered 
Holmes  Business  College,  graduating  from  that  institution  in  1S95.  Desirous  of 
becoming  a  jeweler  and  an  optician  he  studied  for  that  work  and  was  thus  equipped 
to  enter  business  in  Newberg  as  a  clerk.  His  ability  in  that  line  of  work  was  soon 
demonstrated  and  after  two  years  spent  in  clerking  he  purchased  the  store  where 
he  was  employed  and  conducted  it  with  success  for  the  following  two  years.  Dispos- 
ing of  the  store  in  Newberg  Mr.  Winters  removed  to  Grants  Pass,  where  he  estab- 
lished a  like  business  and  then,  having  a  good  opportunity  to  sell  this  establish- 
ment, he  located  in  Oakland,  where  he  remained  in  business  for  about  four  years. 
In  1904  he  located  in  Klamath  Falls,  where  he  has  since  resided,  and  during  his 
seventeen  years  of  residence  there  has  built  up  a  business  of  extensive  proportions. 
In  fact  his  patronage  has  so  steadily  increased  that  he  was  compelled  to  erect  a 
building  of  his  own  in  1920.  This  building  is  located  in  the  choicest  section  of  Main 
street  and  he  moved  into  it  in  the  spring  of  1921.  It  is  three  stories  high,  of  a  fine 
quality  brick,  and  in  every  particular  is  a  modern  first  class  structure.  It  is  forty- 
one  and  one-half  by  one  hundred  and  six  feet  and  the  entire  ground  floor  and  base- 
ment are  used  by  Mr.  Winters,  while  the  second  and  third  floors  are  devoted  to  offices 
and  apartments.  Being  a  firm  believer  that  satisfied  patrons  are  the  best  adver- 
tisement, Mr.  Winters  handles  only  the  finest  quality  of  jewelry  and  silverware,  always 


HERMAN  J.  WINTERS 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  177 

of  the  latest  pattern.  He  has  an  optical  department,  grinding  his  own  lenses  on  the 
premises,  another  for  the  manufacture  of  jewelry  and  has  installed  a  department 
devoted  to  pianos,  phonographs  and  musical  merchandise.  The  whole  establish- 
ment is  thoroughly  modern  in  all  appointments,  in  the  scope  and  variety  of  stock, 
and  in  the  efficiency  ot  its  service  to  a  discriminating  and  appreciative  trade.  Alto- 
gether it   is  a  model  house  of   its   kind  and   a  credit  to  the  city  of  Klamath   Falls. 

In  1913  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Winters  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Hamilton,  a 
native  of  New  Brunswick,  whose  family  are  now  prominent  citizens  of  Oregon.  Mrs. 
Winters  is  a  woman  of  charming  personality  and  takes  an  active  and  prominent 
part  in  the  social  activities  of  the  community. 

The  political  allegiance  of  Mr.  Winters  is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  though 
he  has  been  frequently  solicited  to  do  so  he  has  never  accepted  public  office,  preferring 
to  devote  his  whole  attention  to  his  business  affairs.  His  fraternal  connections 
are  with  the  Odd  Fellows  and  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  in  which  latter  order  he  has 
filled  all  of  the  chairs  and  has  twice  been  a  member  of  the  Grand  Lodge.  Mrs. 
Winters  is  likewise  active  in  fraternal  circles  as  a  member  of  the  Rebekahs.  Mr. 
Winters  as  an  active  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  is  keenly  interested  in 
all  that  pertains  to  the  material,  intellectual,  social,  political  and  moral  welfare 
of  his  community  and  is  widely  recognized  as  a  business  man  of  ability  and  a 
citizen  who  is  ever  loyal  to  the  best  interests  of  Klamath  Falls. 


GLEN  ROY  METSKER. 


No  young  man  in  Oregon  has  more  stanch  friends  than  Glen  Roy  Metsker,  who 
has  practiced  his  profession  for  many  years  in  St.  Helen^.  His  honesty,  integrity 
and  laudable  ambition  have  helped  him  to  rise  to  the  position  ot  prominence  which 
he  now  holds,  and  all  who  know  him  feel  that  his  reward  is  well  earned.  Mr.  Metsker 
was  born  in  Butler  county,  Kansas,  February  20,  1883,  the  son  ot  L.  A.  and  Ada  M. 
(Schmeltzer)  Metsker.  His  father  was  a  teacher  and  a  farmer  and  came  to  Oregon 
in  1884,  where  he  engaged  in  farming  near  Newberg  until  1890.  He  then  moved  to 
Winlock,  Washington,  where  he  became  president  of  the  Capital  Lumber  Company.  He 
has  retired  from  active  business  and  resides  at  Tacoma,  Washington. 

Glen  R.  Metsker  was  educated  in  the  grades  at  Winlock,  Washington,  the  Belling- 
ham  Normal  School  at  Bellingham,  Washington,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in 
1902,  and  the  University  of  Washington,  graduating  therefrom  in  1908.  He  was 
admitted  to  the  bar  of  Washington  supreme  court  in  1909  and  to  the  California  su- 
preme court  in  1911.  During  1907  he  was  connected  with  the  United  States  Land 
Office  in  Washington  and  was  one  of  the  three  highest  in  that  service.  He  was  in  the 
government  service  for  three  and  one  half  years,  a  portion  of  which  time  was  spent  in 
the  General  Land  Office  in  Alaska.  Returning  to  Oregon,  he  located  for  the  practice 
of  his  profession  at  St.  Helens  and  in  1916  was  elected  district  attorney,  which  position 
he  held  until  1921.  He  represents  some  of  the  largest  corporations  in  the  state,  is  a 
forceful  speaker  and  very  aggressive  in  the  discharge  of  his  clients'  affairs.  His 
standing  at  the  bar  is  unquestioned. 

Glen  Roy  Metsker  was  married  February  22,  1911,  to  Miss  Mary  Katharine  Shan- 
non of  Forest  Grove,  Oregon,  and  to  them  have  been  born  two  children:  A  daughter 
Alice  Katharine;   and  a  son  Glen  Roy,  Jr. 

Mr.  Metsker  is  a  thirty-second  degree  Mason,  a  Shriner  and  an  Odd  Fellow.  No 
young  man  in  the  state  has  more  stanch  friends  than  he,  for  he  is  conceded  to  be 
a  fair  fighter  and  what  the  world  calls  a  "straight  shooter."  He  has  before  him  a  very 
successful  future,  both  at  the  bar  and  in  the  political  arena. 


SHERMAN   C.   DRAPER. 


Sherman  C.  Draper,  president  of  the  Pacific  Grain  Company  and  thus  connected 
with  one  of  the  leading  business  interests  of  Portland,  was  born  in  Jeffersonville,  Ohio, 
July  21,  1886,  his  parents  being  Charles  E.  and  Mollie  B.  (Victor)  Draper.  The  father 
was  also  a  native  of  Jeffersonville,  Ohio,  born  in  1865,  and  in  the  Buckeye  state  the 
parents  were  married.     The  father  devoted  his  life  to  the  occupation  of  farming  until 

Vol.  Ill— 12 


178  HISTORY  OP  OREGON 

his  death,  which  occurred  in  1893.  His  widow  survived  him  for  about  sixteen  years, 
passing  away  in  1909. 

Sherman  C.  Draper  was  largely  reared  in  Covington,  Kentucky,  to  which  place 
his  widowed  mother  removed  in  1895,  there  residing  until  1900.  The  family  home 
was  then  established  in  Almira.  Washington,  where  Sherman  C.  Draper  started  out 
in  the  business  world.  He  had  had  but  limited  educational  opportunities,  but  through 
lite  has  learned  many  valuable  lessons  in  the  school  of  experience.  In  1903  he  ob- 
tained a  position  as  bookkeeper  and  salesman  in  a  grain  and  implement  house  and  in 
190S  went  to  Spokane.  Washington,  as  a  grain  buyer  for  his  Almira  employer,  remain- 
ing in  that  city  until  May  20,  1913.  He  then  entered  the  employ  of  Max  Houser  of 
Portland  as  grain  buyer  and  so  continued  at  Spokane,  Washington,  until  December 
6,  1915,  when  he  took  up  his  abode  in  Portland  to  become  assistant  to  Mr.  Houser,  in 
whose  employ  he  remained  until  July,  1917,  when  the  Pacific  Grain  Company  was 
organized  by  Mr.  Houser  and  Mr.  Draper  was  elected  to  the  presidency  thereof. 
Throughout  practically  his  entire  business  career  he  has  been  connected  with  the 
grain  trade  and  each  passing  year  has  brought  him  broader  experience  and  wider 
knowledge,  so  that  he  is  well  qualified  to  discharge  the  duties  of  the  executive  position 
which  he  is  now  filling.  He  is  also  the  president  of  the  Wallowa  Milling  &  Grain 
Company  of  Enterprise,  Oregon,  and  is  thoroughly  acquainted  with  the  conditions  of 
the  grain  trade  in  the  northwest  from  the  point  of  production  until  the  grain  is  sold 
on  the  market. 

On  the  20th  of  October,  1908,  in  Spokane,  Washington,  Mr.  Draper  was  married 
to  Miss  Estella  G.  Jeffers  and  they  have  one  child,  Mildred  E.  Mr.  Draper  belongs 
to  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  of  Portland  and  the  work  of  that  organization  is  of 
much  interest  to  him  and  wins  his  cooperation  along  many  lines.  He  also  belongs 
to  the  Press  Club,  is  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  gives  his  political 
allegiance  to  the  republican  party.  All  these  things,  however,  are  but  side  issues  in 
his  life,  being  made  subservient  to  his  greater  activity  in  the  field  of  business,  and  it 
has  been  by  reason  of  his  close  application,  his  thorough  reliability  and  his  earnest 
purpose  that  he  has  worked  his  way  steadily  upward  to  the  point  of  active  control  in 
grain  circles  in  the  northwest. 


VERNON  HILL  VAWTER. 


Vernon  Hill  Vawter,  cashier  of  the  Jackson  County  Bank  of  Medford  and  its  chief 
executive,  is  not  only  prominently  associated  with  business  interests  and  enterprises 
which  have  much  to  do  with  the  upbuilding  of  the  city,  but  has  in  many  other  ways 
manifested  his  public  spirit  through  cooperation  with  projects  of  great  benefit  to  the 
state.  He  now-  has  the  distinction  of  serving  as  the  youngest  member  of  the  board 
of  regents  of  the  State  University  and  his  labors  are  at  all  times  a  direct  and  con- 
structive element  of  public  progress.  Mr.  Vawter  is  numbered  among  the  native  sons 
of  Medford,  his  birth  having  occurred  November  13,  1890,  his  parents  being  William 
I.  and  Etta  M.  (Hill)  Vawter.  The  father  was  also  a  native  of  Linn  county  and  the 
members  of  the  family  rank  high  as  factors  in  the  growth  and  progress  of  southern 
Oregon.  The  first  American  ancestors  of  the  Vawter  family  came  from  England  more 
than  a  hundred  years  ago.  William  I.  Vawter  has  the  credit  of  being  the  "father  of 
banking"  in  Medford  and  his  fame  is  not  confined  alone  to  this  field  of  activity,  for 
his  memory  is  cherished  as  that  of  one  of  the  potential  builders  of  the  town,  his  efforts 
contributing  in  substantial  measure  in  many  ways  to  the  early  progress  and  later 
improvements  of  the  city. 

Vernon  H.  Vawter  was  educated  in  the  graded  and  high  schools  of  Medford  and 
in  the  University  of  Oregon.  Following  his  graduation  from  the  state  institution  he 
returned  to  Medford  and  accepted  a  position  in  the  Jackson  County  Bank,  of  which 
his  father  was  then  president.  The  son  is  now  the  cashier  of  the  bank  and  its  chief 
executive,  contributing  much  to  its  development  and  growth.  In  tact  under  his  guid- 
ance the  bank  has  come  to  be  regarded  as  one  of  the  most  substantial  financial  insti- 
tutions of  the  state. 

During  the  World  war  Mr.  Vawter  was  accepted  in  a  civilian  Officers'  Training 
Camp,  but  returned  home  incapacitated  as  a  result  of  a  severe  attack  of  influenza  and 
before  he  had  recovered  his  health  the  armistice  was  signed.  No  man  of  his  age  in 
Oregon  occupies  a  more  prominent  place  in  the  business  lite  of  the  state  than  does  he. 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  179 

As  a  leading  citizen  of  Medford  he  is  called  to  act  on  every  public  service  committee 
and  tie  cheerfully  responds  to  all  demands  made  upon  his  time  and  means.  He  has 
had  an  unusual  honor  bestowed  upon  him  in  that  he  has  been  selected  as  one  of  the 
regents  of  the  University  of  Oregon,  enjoying  the  distinction  of  being  the  only  man 
of  his  years  who  has  ever  been  so  highly  honored.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Medford 
public  library  board  and  belongs  to  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  of  which  he  served 
as  president,  cooperating  in  all  of  its  activities  for  the  benefit  and  upbuilding  of  the 
city.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party,  and  he  steadily  declines 
to  become  a  candidate  for  office. 

In  1915  Mr.  Vawter  was  married  to  Miss  Aletha  Emerick  of  Boise,  Idaho,  a  daughter 
of  V.  J.  Emerick,  one  of  the  most  prominent  residents  of  the  city,  who  for  two  terms 
served  as  mayor  of  Medford. 

Mr.  Vawter  is  the  treasurer  of  the  Elks  lodge  of  Medford  and  is  also  the  treasurer 
of  the  Big  Bend  Milling  Company,  which  has  constructed  in  Medford  several  of  its  best 
business  blocks  on  Main  street  and  Central  avenue,  North.  Nor  does  Mr.  Vawter  sel- 
fishly confine  his  energies  to  the  gi'owth  and  improvement  of  the  city  in  which  he  makes 
his  home,  but  takes  an  active  interest  in  all  matters  for  the  benefit  of  the  state.  He 
is  now  one  of  the  committee  engaged  in  improving  Crater  Lake  and  the  Crater  Lake 
National  Park.  Progress  and  enterprise  are  the  keynotes  of  his  character  and  have 
constituted  the  forces  that  have  thrown  open  for  him  the  portals  of  success. 


WILLIAM  PENN  RICHARDSON. 

One  of  the  prominent  attorneys  of  Portland  is  William  Penn  Richardson,  who  since 
1906  has  engaged  in  the  general  practice  of  law  in  this  city.  He  has  been  exceptionally 
successful  as  a  trial  lawyer  and  in  a  profession  demanding  keen  intellectuality  and 
individual  merit  he  is  making  continuous  progress.  Mr.  Richardson  was  born  in  Pike 
county,  Arkansas,  September  15,  1877,  a  son  of  Jesse  Clinton  Richardson,  who  was 
born  in  Tennessee  in  1829.  He  was  a  Union  man,  but  while  residing  in  Arkansas  was 
conscripted  into  the  Confederate  army  in  1864  and  served  under  General  Price.  In 
Magnolia,  Arkansas,  he  married  Martha  Ann  Baker  and  his  demise  occurred  at  Amity 
in  1877,  while  the  mother  there  passed  away  on  the  31st  of  December,  1914. 

In  the  public  schools  of  Amity,  Arkansas,  William  P.  Richardson  acquired  his 
preliminary  education  and  subsequently  became  a  student  in  the  law  department  of 
Cumberland  University  at  Lebanon,  Tennessee,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1898 
with  the  LL.  B.  degree.  Going  to  Phoenix,  Arizona,  he  there  practiced  law  until  1906, 
when  he  made  his  way  to  the  Pacific  northwest,  taking  up  his  residence  in  Portland, 
where  he  has  since  engaged  in  general  practice.  He  enjoys  in  large  measure  the  con- 
fidence and  respect  of  his  fellow  practitioners  and  that  he  has  the  trust  of  the  general 
public  is  indicated  in  the  extensive  clientage  accorded  him.  For  about  eight  years  he 
was  a  law  partner  of  J.  F.  Boothe,  a  prominent  attorney  of  this  city,  but  is  now  prac- 
ticing independently.  He  is  thorough  and  painstaking  in  the  preparation  of  his  cases, 
so  that  he  always  enters  the  courtroom  well  prepared  tor  defense  as  well  as  for  attack, 
and  he  has  won  notable  success  as  a  trial  lawyer,  being  strong  in  argument  and  logical 
in  his  deductions.  His  time  and  attention  are  largely  given  to  his  professional  work, 
although  he  is  also  interested  in  several  large  corporations  of  the  city,  and  his  energy, 
close  application  and  ability  have  won  for  him  success  and  prominence  in  his  chosen 
life  work. 

On  the  6th  of  July,  1912,  Mr.  Richardson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Edith 
King,  a  resident  of  this  city  and  a  daughter  of  the  late  Emanuel  King,  whose  birth 
occurred  in  Ohio.  They  have  become  the  parents  of  a  daughter,  Billie  King.  In  his 
political  views  Mr.  Richardson  is  a  republican  and  while  residing  in  Phoenix,  Arizona, 
he  took  an  active  part  in  political  affairs  of  that  section  of  the  country.  Fraternally 
he  is  a  Mason,  belonging  to  Willamette  Lodge,  No.  2.  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  to  Oregon  Consistory 
of  the  Scottish  Rite,  in  which  he  has  attained  the  thirty-second  degree,  and  to  Al 
Kader  Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  is  also  connected  with  the  Benevolent  Protect- 
ive Order  of  Elks  and  the  Woodmen  of  the  World  and  his  interest  in  the  welfare 
and  advancement  of  his  city  is  indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  Chamber  of  Com- 
merce. He  possesses  a  pleasant  and  genial  disposition,  seldom  loses  his  temper  and  to 
his  friends  is  most  kind  and  generous,  being  ever  ready  to  extend  a  favor.  He  is 
therefore  popular  in  social  circles  of  the  city  as  a  member  of  the  Multnomah  Amateur 


180  HISTORY  OP  OREGON 

Athletic,  Press  and  Laurelrest  Clubs  and  for  recreation  he  turns  to  hunting.  During 
the  World  war  he  served  as  legal  adviser  on  the  exemption  board  and  in  June,  1899, 
while  the  Spanish-American  war  was  in  progress,  he  enlisted  at  Lyle,  Georgia,  as  a 
member  of  Company  H,  First  Arkansas  Volunteer  Infantry.  He  was  sent  to  the  training 
camp  at  Chickamauga  Park  and  was  honorably  discharged  October  25,  1899.  Mr. 
Richardson  has  made  continuous  progress  in  his  profession.  Nature  endowed  him  with 
a  keen  intellect  and  his  analytical  powers  and  careful  preparation  of  his  cases  have 
won  for  him  a  place  among  the  strong  and  able  lawyers  at  the  bar  of  Portland.  He  is 
a  loyal  and  public-spirited  citizen,  interested  in  all  that  has  to  do  with  the  welfare 
and  advancement  of  his  community,  and  enjoys  the  warm  friendship  and  high  regard 
of  a  large  circle  of  friends. 


FREDERICK  L.   MEYERS. 


Well  known  in  the  financial  circles  of  La  Grande,  Union  county,  Oregon,  is  Fred- 
erick L.  Meyers,  who  for  many  years  has  served  the  La  Grande  National  Bank  as 
cashier.  He  is  a  native  of  Toronto,  Canada,  where  his  birth  occurred  on  the  9th  of 
August,  1866,  a  son  of  George  F.  L.  and  Ellen   (Sullivan)    Meyers. 

Frederick  L.  Meyers  owes  to  the  schools  of  his  native  city  his  early  education  and 
in  due  time  he  entered  the  University  of  Ottawa  and  there  completed  his  course 
in  the  required  number  of  years.  For  seven  years  after  putting  his  textbooks  aside 
he  was  employed  in  Canadian  civil  service  but  at  the  termination  of  that  time,  in  1890, 
he  came  to  Oregon,  settling  in  La  Grande.  There  he  was  connected  with  the  Grand 
Ronde  Lumber  Company,  remaining  in  this  association  until  September  14,  1890.  He 
then  entered  into  the  services  of  the  La  Grande  National  Bank  in  the  capacity  of  office 
boy,  determining  to  work  himself  up  to  a  position  of  importance  and  trust.  As  a 
result  of  this  laudable  ambition  he  was  eventually  made  cashier,  an  office  he  is  still 
holding  to  the  complete  satisfaction  of  the  officers  and  patrons  of  the  bank.  The  bank 
was  organized  in  1887  by  Dr.  M.  F.  Honan,  R.  J.  Rogers,  Henry  Anson,  Henry  Wildey, 
and  R.  M.  Steel,  with  a  capital  of  sixty  thousand  dollars.  The  bank  seemed  assured 
of  success  from  the  very  start  and  it  now  has  a  capital  of  two  hundred  thousand 
dollars,  a  surplus  of  sixty-flve  thousand  dollars,  assets  of  two  and  one-half  millions, 
and  deposits  amounting  to  one  and  three-quarters  millions.  In  his  position  as  cashier 
of  the  bank  Mr.  Meyers  is  constantly  coming  into  contact  with  the  public  and  by 
his  courtesy,  willingness  and  business  ability  has  won  the  confidence  and  goodwill 
of  all  with  whom  he  has  had  dealings.  His  popularity  was  manifest  in  his  election  to 
the  mayoralty  of  La  Grande  and  for  a  number  of  terms  he  served  as  a  member  of  the 
city  council. 

In  1899  he  married  Miss  Mildred  Lee  Newin,  daughter  of  Ferdinand  and  Beulah 
(Palmer)  Newin,  and  a  native  of  Iowa.  Her  father  was  born  in  Maryland,  while  her 
mother  was  a  native  of  Pennsylvania.  Four  children  have  been  born  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Meyers:    Dorothy  M.,  Alfred  L.,  Paul  F.,  and  Margaret  E. 

In  the  fraternal  circles  of  La  Grande  Mr.  Meyers  is  well  known  as  an  Elk,  a 
Knight  of  Columbus,  and  a  Woodman  of  the  World.  In  the  line  of  his  work  he  holds 
membership  in  the  Oregon  State  Bankers  Association  and  served  as  president  of  that 
organization  during  the  year  1916.  Along  lines  of  civic  improvement  his  support 
may  always  be  counted  upon  and  he  is  one  of  the  directors  of  the  Young  Men's  Chris- 
tian Association.  Mr.  Meyers  has  made  steady  progress  since  starting  out  in  life 
on  his  own  account.  His  powers  and  ability  have  been  developed  through  exercise  and 
his  record  is  indicative  of  what  may  be  accomplished  when  determination  and  ambi- 
tion lead   the   way. 


AUGUSTUS  FANNO. 


Augustus  Fanno  was  of  French  ancestry,  the  family  having  left  France  during 
the  troubled  period  of  the  French  Revolution  of  1789  when  the  land-owners  were  being 
dispossessed  of  their  holdings  by  what  we  now  call  the  Bolsheviks.  The  family  came  to 
America  and  settled  in  the  state  of  Maine  where  Mr.  Fanno  was  born  in  1804.  He  was 
not  destined  to  pass  his  days  in  peace  and  comfort,  as  at  the  age  of  twenty  years  he 


FREDERICK   L.    MEYERS 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  183 

sailing  ship  bound  tor  the  West  Indies.  The  ship  called  at  New  York,'  and 
so  ninety-five  years  ago  he  stood  on  Broadway  and  marveled  at  the  wonders  of  the 
even  then  great  city.  Alter  spending  three  and  a  half  years  on  the  sea  he  was  stricken 
with  the  dread  pestilence  of  yellow  fever  while  unloading  his  ship  at  the  docks  at 
New  Orleans  and  for  six  weeks  he  laid  in  the  hospital  while  hundreds  of  people  died 
on  every  side.  Later  he  began  teaching  school  in  the  southern  states.  He  taught  what 
was  then  known  as  a  subscription  school.  The  teacher  would  rent  a  building  if  there 
was  no  schoolhouse  and  secure  the  pupils  from  the  surrounding  country,  they  paying 
so  much  apiece.  These  pupils  generally  came  from  the  non-slaveholding  or  poor  white 
class.  He  finally  made  his  way  to  Missouri,  then  a  frontier  western  state.  He  taught 
school  in  what  is  now  known  as  Cass  county.  In  1S40  he  was  married  to  Miss  Martha 
Furguson.  One  son  was  born  of  this  marriage,  Eugene  B.  Fanno,  now  a  man  of 
eighty  years  residing  at  Chico,  California.  While  yet  in  Missouri  Mr.  Fanno  saw 
some  of  the  regiments  of  American  soldiers  making  their  preparations  to  march  against 
Mexico.  These  were  the  men  who  won  every  battle  they  fought,  and  in  every  in- 
stance against  what  seemed   to  be  overwhelming  odds. 

In  1S46  Mr.  Fanno  with  his  wife  and  little  son  joined  the  immigration  train  of 
that  year  at  Independence,  Missouri,  and  began  the  long  and  perilous  journey  across 
the  desert  sands  to  Oregon.  The  Indians  were  both  numerous  and  dangerous.  At 
times  they  rode  by  the  side  of  the  moving  immigration  train  looking  with  greedy  eyes 
upon  the  great  number  of  oxen,  horses,  cattle  and  the  valuable  camp  equipage.  They 
made  no  attacks,  as  they  saw  that  the  white  men  were  heavily  armed  and  without 
fear  and  that  their  rifles  would  take  a  fearful  toll  from  their  bands.  When  the  train 
reached  the  Columbia  river  after  a  six-months'  trip,  fiatboats  were  constructed  and 
all  their  goods  were  floated  down  over  the  Cascades  without  any  serious  mishaps — 
a  feat  which  would  not  be  attempted  at  the  present  time.  The  company  finally  reached 
Oregon  City  where  it  was  disbanded.  At  Oregon  City  Mr.  Fanno  suffered  a  great 
misfortune  in  the  death  of  his  wife.  She  was  buried  at  Linn  City.  Mr.'  Fanno  took 
a  trip  up  the  valley  to  Butteville  but  realizing  that  the  future  great  city  of  the  North- 
west would  be  built  below  the  falls  of  the  Willamette  he  followed  the  well-beaten  and 
much  traveled  Indian  trail  leading  to  the  Tualatin  plains  and  on  over  the  mountains 
to  Tillamook  bay.  David  Douglas,  the  naturalist,  with  the  Hudson  Bay  Company  at 
Vancouver  had  followed  this  trail  in  1824  to  the  spot  where  Mr.  Fanno  staked  his  claim 
in  1846.  David  Douglas  describes  it  as  a  place  where  thousands  of  ring-necked  pigeons 
came  to  feed  on  the  salt  marsh  and  the  deer  and  elk  came  in  great  numbers  to  drink. 
It  was  then  a  most  beautiful  country.  The  forest  was  quite  heavy  in  places,  but  as 
there  was  no  underbrush  and  no  fallen  timber  one  could  travel  anywhere  with  a  wagon 
where  he  could  get  between  the  trees.  Afterwards  the  trail  was  almost  obliterated 
by  being  followed  by  the  wagon  road.  The  place  Mr.  Fanno  selected  tor  his  home  was 
twelve  miles  from  Oregon  City  and  eight  miles  from  Portland,  with  no  neighbors  within 
several  miles.  He  employed  the  Indians  to  carry  his  supplies,  pigs,  calves,  chickens 
and  nursery  stock  from  Oregon  City,  as  there  was  no  road  to  Portland.  The  Indians 
were  good  workers  and  reliable.  With  their  assistance  he  cleared  land  and  put  up 
buildings  out  of  logs  and  boards.  He  did  everything  in  true  New  England  style.  It  the 
wolves  howled  and  the  panthers  screamed  in  the  forests  which  came  almost  to  the  door 
of  the  cabin  it  made  no  difference  to  him  unless  the  bears  got  to  bothering  his  pigs. 
He  shot  deer  and  other  game  while  standing  in  his  door,  as  this  was  the  greatest  game 
country  in  the  world.  The  Indians  set  fire  to  the  grass  each  fall  to  prevent  the  under- 
growth from  taking  the  pasture.  All  kinds  of  large  and  small  game  and  fish  were 
plentiful  everywhere. 

Immigration  was  halted  by  the  war  with  Mexico  and  the  gold  discoveries  in  Cali- 
fornia, but  began  again  in  1849,  '50,  '51  and  '52.  The  immigration  in  1849  brought 
Thomas  H.,  Robert  and  Aaron  Denney,  Felix,  John  and  James  Hicklin,  and  during  the 
next  three  years  brought  Samuel  and  James  M.  Stott  and  Thomas  A.  Stott,  all  these 
people  coming  from  the  same  neighborhood  in  Southern  Indiana  and  they  were  all 
related  to  each  other.  They  settled  in  the  same  locality  and  became  the  neighbors  of 
Mr.  Fanno.  Others  who  came  at  the  same  time  and  settled  on  adjoining  claims  were 
Thos.  H.  and  William  and  Henry  Tucker,  James  and  Thos.  McKay,  Pembroke  and 
John  Gault,  James  Davis,  J.  W.  Robinson,  Wilson  Tiggard.  John  and  Allen  Richason 
and  Alexander  Gustin,  the  last  named  being  the  only  one  now  living.  Mr.  Fanno  found 
himself  surrounded  by  the  most  agreeable  neighbors. 

In  1850  he  was  married  to  Rebecca  Jane  Denney,  a  sister  to  the  Denney  brothers 
above  mentioned.     She  was  born  in  Kentucky,  May  30,  1819,  and  immigrated  to  Indiana 


184  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

in  her  early  years.  She  was  reared  in  that  state  and  came  to  Oregon  with  her  three 
brothers  and  three  sisters  in  1849.  Of  this  marriage  there  were  born  six  children, 
four  of  whom  survive:  Mrs.  T.  L.  Morlock,  Mrs.  J.  D.  Wilmot,  A.  J.  and  A.  R.  Fanno. 
Of  the  other  descendants  we  might  mention  a  great-great-grandson,  William  Dexter 
Cooper.  In  the  early  fifties  Mr.  Fanno  began  the  cultivation  of  onions  of  which  he 
was  the  pioneeer  grower,  on  the  beaver-dam  land  of  which  he  owned  a  considerable 
tract  and  later  on  he  made  this  business  a  specialty.  He  improved  on  the  eastern 
yellow  Danvers  by  careful  selection  of  bulbs  extending  over  a  period  of  twenty  years, 
until  he  developed  an  onion  which  would  keep  in  the  damp  climate  of  Oregon  until  the 
middle  of  May.  The  same  tract  of  land  has  been  in  constant  cultivation  in  onions 
until  the  present  time,  this  year  having  grown  one  of  the  very  best  crops  after  seventy 
years  of  cultivation  and  almost  entirely  without  fertilization  excepting  what  is  brought 
on  by  the  winter  floods.  When  Thomas  H.  Denney  built  a  sawmill  on  the  adjoining 
section  Mr.  Fanno  put  up  new  buildings  of  lumber,  but  let  the  log  buildings  remain. 
A  dwelling  house  and  a  barn  built  of  lumber  still  stand.  Mr.  Fanno  was  able  to  give 
assistance  to  many  new  settlers.  He  gave  employment  to  many  people,  paying  them 
in  meat,  potatoes  and  other  products.  Gold  became  plentiful  and  cheap.  A  pair  of 
boots  would  cost  forty  dollars,  a  suit  of  clothes  would  cost  a  hundred  and  fifty  dollars, 
a  sack  of  potatoes  ten  dollars  and  apples  twelve  dollars  a  box.  This  was  the  result 
of  the  gold  discoveries  in  California.  Mr.  Fanno  was  a  republican  in  politics,  having 
voted  for  Fremont,  Lincoln  and  Grant. 

He  passed  away  June  30,  1884,' at  his  home  on  the  farm  which   is  still  owned  by 
his  sons  and  thus  Oregon  lost  one  of  her  most  honored  and  respected  pioneers. 


HOWARD   LEROY   DUMBLE,   M.  D. 

Dr.  Howard  Leroy  Dumble,  actively  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  at  Hood 
River,  his  success  being  founded  upon  thorough  preparation  and  subsequent  broad 
study  of  the  principles  of  medicine  and  surgery,  was  born  in  Marion,  Ohio,  in  1860. 
his  parents  being  Samuel  and  Elizabeth  (Corn)  Dumble,  who  were  of  English  lineage, 
the  family  being  founded  in  America  toward  the  close  of  the  seventeenth  century.  The 
Doctor's  grandfather  was  a  California  pioneer  of  1848  and  for  many  years  was  engaged 
in  merchandising  in  that  state.  The  record  of  the  Corn  family  in  America  antedates 
the  Revolutionary  war  and  many  of  the  name  served  the  country  in  that  historic 
struggle  for  American  supremacy.  Samuel  Dumble  left  Pennsylvania,  his  native  state, 
in  early  manhood  and  took  up  his  residence  in  Ohio,  where  he  secured  a  position  of 
importance.  For  many  years  he  was  the  editor  and  publisher  of  the  Marion  Independ- 
ent, which  under  his  guidance  became  a  power  in  newspaper  circles  in  molding  public 
thought  and  opinion. 

Dr.  Dumble  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Marion  and  after  leaving  the  high 
school  continued  his  studies  in  Ohio  Wesleyan  University  at  Delaware,  Ohio.  His 
father  was  well-to-do  and  was  willing  to  pay  for  the  boy's  education,  but  he  preferred 
to  work  his  way  through  school  and  taught  for  two  years  while  taking  his  college 
course.  Following  his  graduation  from  college  he  decided  upon  the  practice  of  medicine 
as  a  life  work  and  soon  afterward  enrolled  as  a  student  in  the  medical  department 
of  the  National  University  at  Washington,  D.  C.  In  1893  he  was  graduated  with  the 
M.  D.  degree  and  accepted  a  position  as  medical  examiner  in  the  interior  department, 
remaining  in  the  medical  service  through  the  succeeding  eight  years. 

In  1901  Dr.  Dumble  came  to  Oregon  on  a  visit  which  included  Hood  River.  Be- 
coming infatuated  with  the  country,  especially  the  Hood  River  valley,  he  immediately 
resigned  from  the  government  service  and  took  up  the  practice  of  his  profession  in 
the  city  which  has  since  been  his  home  and  the  scene  of  his  labors.  While  his  practice 
has  made  constant  demand  upon  his  strength  and  his  energies,  he  has  found  time  to 
lend  a  helping  hand  to  every  enterprise  that  promises  good  to  Hood  River.  Appreciat- 
ing his  willingness  and  his  capability,  his  fellow  citizens  elected  him  to  the  office  of 
mayor  and  reelected  him  at  the  close  of  his  first  term,  so  that  he  served  from  1915  until 
1919,  giving  to  the  city  a  businesslike  and  progressive  administration.  He  has  also 
held  the  office  of  coroner  and  has  served  on  the  school  board  for  many  terms.  Dr. 
Dumble  was  most  anxious  to  aid  his  country  in  the  World  war  and  volunteered  three 
different  times,  but  as  the  military  regulations  bar  a  man  beyond  fifty-five  years  of  age, 
he  was  forced  to  remain  at  home.    He  proposed  to  pay  his  own  expenses  and  though  he 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  185 

is  a  man  young  for  his  years,  he  could  not  be  accepted.  Dr.  Dumble  is  still  actively 
engaged  in  practice  and  meets  with  excellent  success  in  his  undertakings.  He  is  most 
careful  in  diagnosis  and  is  seldom,  if  ever,  at  fault  in  foretelling  the  outcome  of  disease. 
He  is  owner  of  a  large  orchard  a  tew  miles  south  of  the  city,  producing  the  famous 
Newton  apples  and  he  is  a  member  of  the  Apple  Growers'  Association. 

Dr.  Dumble  was  married  to  Miss  Katharyn  Idleman,  daughter  of  Silas  Idleman,  an 
extensive  farmer  of  Marion,  Ohio,  whose  parents  were  among  the  earliest  settlers  of 
that  state.  Dr.  Dumble  is  a  Knight  Templar  Mason  and  member  of  the  Mystic  Shrine. 
Along  strictly  professional  lines  he  is  connected  with  the  Oregon  Medical  Society  and 
the  American  Medical  Association.  His  standing  as  a  physician  is  high  and  as  a  public- 
spirited  citizen  he  occupies  a  place  in  the  front  rank. 


LEANDER  H.  BAKER. 


Leander  H.  Baker  is  closely  associated  with  the  educational  progress  of  Portland 
as  the  principal  of  the  Schaffer  school.  Moreover,  he  is  a  representative  of  one  of  the 
old  and  honored  pioneer  families  of  the  state  and  is  familiar  in  every  way  with  the  early 
history  of  Oregon,  his  reminiscences  of  the  initial  work  of  development  and  progress 
in  the  northwest  being  most  interesting.  He  was  born  in  Hopkins  county,  Kentucky, 
August  18,  1849,  and  is  a  son  of  C.  B.  and  Eliza  (Berry)  Baker,  both  of  whom  were 
natives  of  Hopkins  county,  Kentucky.  The  grandfather  in  the  paternal  line  was  James 
Baker,  who  followed  Daniel  Boone  into  "the  dark  and  bloody  ground"  at  a  very  early 
period  in  the  settlement  of  Kentucky.  He  ran  away  from  home  at  the  age  of  fourteen 
years  in  order  to  participate  in  the  Revolutionary  war  and  suffered  the  untold  hardships 
experienced  by  the  American  troops  at  Valley  Forge.  He  was  born  in  North  Carolina 
and  the  experiences  of  his  life  were  indeed  varied  and  interesting,  covering  his  military 
activities  and  his  connection  with  the  pioneer  development  of  Hopkins  county,  Ken- 
tucky. He  wedded  Mary  Davis,  a  cousin  of  Jefferson  Davis  and  a  native  of  the  Blue 
Grass  state. 

C.  B.  Baker,  with  his  wife  and  family,  came  to  Oregon  in  1853.  He  and  his  lifelong 
friend,  James  Biles,  organized  what  was  known  as  the  Kentucky  train  of  one  hundred 
and  eighty-three  people  which  had  the  distinction  of  cutting  the  first  road  from  the  sum- 
mit of  the  Cascades  to  Puget  Sound.  In  the  train  were  Asher  Sargent  and  his  family. 
His  son.  Nelson  Sargent,  had  preceded  the  parents  to  the  Puget  Sound  country.  This 
son  met  the  train  near  the  present  site  of  Pendleton  and  advised  the  leaders  to  turn 
north'  from  the  Oregon  trail  and  go  into  the  Puget  Sound  district.  They  found  the 
road  open  to  the  summit  of  the  Cascades  and  after  reaching  that  point  there  was  no 
alternative  but  to  cut  their  way  through  to  the  Puget  Sound;  and  in  so  doing  they 
were  able  to  average  only  about  three  miles  per  day.  Feed  for  the  stock  was  scarce 
and  indeed  the  animals  were  starving.  One  morning  Mr.  Baker,  who  owned  a  fine 
thoroughbred  mare,  said  to  his  wife:  "Kit  is  down  and  can't  get  up;  I  can't  bear  to 
kill  her  and  I  hate  to  leave  her  to  die."  When  the  train  was  ready  to  move  Mrs. 
Baker  said:  "Go  on,  I  am  not  ready  to  go."  She  stayed  with  the  mare,  carried  water 
from  a  nearby  canyon,  gathered  bits  of  moss,  twigs  and  scant  grass,  watered  and  fed 
the  mare  and  by  noon  coaxed  the  animal  to  her  feet  and  soon  overtook  the  train.  The 
next  morning  the  situation  was  the  same  as  the  previous  morning.  When  the  train 
was  ready  to  start,  Mrs.  Baker  said:  "I  am  not  going  to  give  it  up  yet."  About  noon 
she  again  overtook  the  train,  leading  the  mare,  and  from  that  time  on  the  animal 
was  able  to  travel  with  the  train.  Twelve  years  after  one  of  her  sons  competed 
successfully  in  the  races  at  the  Oregon  State  Fair.  As  the  party  traveled  on  they  met 
great  hardships  and  difficulties.  Many  of  the  hills  on  the  descent  were  so  steep  that 
wagons  had  to  lowered  by  ropes.  On  reaching  one  of  the  last  and  the  steepest  it  was 
found  that  the  ropes  were  so  much  worn  that  there  was  not  length  enough  to  reach 
the  bottom  of  the  hill.  The  night  before  an  ox  was  so  seriously  crippled  that  he  had 
to  be  shot.  His  hide  was  taken  off,  cut  into  strips  and  platted  into  a  rope,  but  it  was 
not  long  enough.  James  Biles,  one  of  the  leaders  of  the  train  and  probably  the  wealth- 
iest, said  to  one  of  his  teamsters:  "Bring  the  poorest  ox  in  my  team."  The  ox  was 
brought,  Mr.  Biles  ordered  him  shot  and  the  hide  was  stripped  off  and  platted  into 
rope,  but  this  with  all  the  rope  that  could  be  found  was  not  yet  enough.  Mr.  Biles 
said:  "Bring  another  ox."  This,  too,  he  ordered  shot  and  the  hide  also  platted  into 
rope,  and  this  addition  to   the  line   proved   sufficient,  so  that  the   wagons   were   safely 


186  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

lowered  and  from  that  point  on  the  party  proceeded  to  their  destination.  It  was  in 
the  fall  of  1852  that  C.  B.  Baker  and  his  brother  Elijah,  made  their  way  from  Kentucky 
to  Missouri  with  their  families  in  order  to  buy  stock  for  the  train  with  which  to  make 
the  trip  to  Oregon  the  next  spring  and  they  were  joined  by  the  other  travelers  from 
Kentucky  at  Independence,  Missouri,  on  the  16th  of  April,  1853,  and  went  into  Camp 
October  16th  on  American  Lake,  the  long  journey  having  been  completed.  Mr.  Baker 
took  up  a  donation  claim  of  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  prairie  land  and  re- 
mained thereon  until  his  death  in  1866.  His  wife  had  passed  away  in  Kentucky  before 
he  started  for  Oregon.  Mr.  Baker  was  an  active  factor  in  the  early  development  of  the 
northwest.  Both  he  and  his  friend,  James  Biles,  were  members  of  the  first  three 
territorial  legislatures  and  thus  he  aided  in  shaping  the  early  political  history  of  the 
state  as  well  as  its  material  development. 

Leander  H.  Baker  obtained  his  early  education  in  the  district  schools  of  the  Puget 
Sound  country  to  the  age  of  sixteen  years,  when  he  walked  from  Olympia  to  Monticello, 
there  to  take  a  boat  to  Salem  in  order  to  attend  the  Willamette  University,  while 
subsequently  he  became  a  student  in  McMinnville  College.  He  later  won  his  degree  from 
Lafayette  Seminary  when  but  nineteen  years  of  age.  He  had  taught  a  term  in  the 
country  school  and  it  was  his  ambition  to  become  a  lawyer,  but  events  shaped  his  career 
otherwise.  He  was  chosen  superintendent  of  schools  of  Yamhill  county  and  so  ex- 
cellent a  record  did  he  make  in  that  position  that  he  was  retained  in  the  office  for  ten 
years.  He  was  also  made  a  member  of  the  state  board  of  school  examiners  and  so  served 
for  thirteen  years.  He  has  continued  in  the  profession  of  teaching  throughout  the 
Intervening  period  and  for  sixteen  years  has  been  connected  with  the  Portland  schools 
and  for  five  years  of  this  time  was  an  officer  of  the  juvenile  court.  He  is  now  principal 
of  the  Schaffer  school  and  is  recognized  as  one  of  the  prominent  representatives  of 
public  education  in  Oregon. 

In  1874  Mr.  Baker  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Sarah  W.  McTeer,  a  daughter 
of  Robert  and  Sarah  (Odell)  McTeer.  who  were  natives  of  Tennessee  and  Indiana  re- 
spectively, and  became  Oregon  pioneers  of  1851.  The  Odell  family  is  mentioned  at  length 
on  another  page  of  this  work.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Baker  were  born  six  children,  five  of 
whom  are  living:  Mabel  P.,  who  is  the  wife  of  Elwood  Layfield,  a  resident  of  Mount 
Vernon,  Ohio;  Carl  C,  an  attorney  at  Salinas,  California;  James  C,  who  died  in  1902; 
Hallie  L.,  the  wife  of  S.  B.  Allen  of  Portland;  Una  G.,  the  wife  of  Walter  Inch  of  Port- 
land; and  Robert  V.,  a  student  at  Rush  Medical  College  of  Chicago,  who  has  been  elected 
president  of  the  Nu  Sigma  Nu. 

Mr.  Baker  has  been  identified  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  since  1875. 
He  also  belongs  to  the  Pioneer  Association  of  Oregon  and  for  the  past  fifteen  years  has 
been  its  assistant  secretary.  He  is  a  lifelong  republican  and  for  many  years  has  been 
a  member  of  the  Evangelical  church.  He  is  a  representative  of  one  of  the  old  and 
honored  pioneer  families  and  although  quite  young  when  the  family  came  to  the  west 
he  can  remember  distinctly  in  1855-6  of  the  midnight  messenger  who  called  to  his  father 
to  get  his  family  into  Fort  Henness  as  quickly  as  possible,  relating  to  him  the  plan  of 
attack  and  telling  him  also  of  the  Indian  tribes  in  the  league.  Mr.  Baker  has  in  his 
possession  a  complete  list  of  the  inmates  of  Fort  Henness,  with  an  accurate  pencil 
drawing  of  the  fort,  and  also  the  roster  of  the  volunteers  of  that  tort,  including  the 
names  of  the  captain,  lieutenants  and  corporals.  The  experiences  of  the  pioneer  country 
are  familiar  to  him  and  he  has  been  a  factor  in  bringing  about  present-day  progress 
and  improvement. 


JOHN  LAWRENCE  HERSHNER. 

The  labors  of  John  Lawrence  Hershner  have  constituted  a  valuable  contribution 
to  central  Oregon  in  its  development  and  upbuilding  and  his  name  is  therefore  in- 
separably interwoven  with  its  history.  He  has  been  particularly  well  known  in  the 
Hood  River  country  and  he  now  makes  his  home  in  the  city  of  Hood  River.  He  was 
born  at  Blooming  Grove,  Morrow  county,  Ohio,  in  1857,  and  in  every  position  in  which 
he  has  found  himself  throughout  an  active  life  he  has  won  and  merited  the  praise  of 
his  fellow  citizens  because  of  the  beneficial  character  of  his  labors  and  his  uprightness 
in  every  relation.  He  was  educated  in  the  graded  schools  of  his  native  town  and  in 
the  Lexington  Seminary.  In  1879  he  became  a  resident  of  the  Willamette  valley.  Though 
but  little  past  his  majority,  he  decided  that  the  firmest  props  of  mankind  were  religion 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  187 

and  morality  and  he  took  up  the  study  of  theology.  For  two  years  he  served  as  assist- 
ant pastor  at  Albany,  Oregon,  and  from  1882  until  1886  at  Independence.  His  next 
charge  was  at  Corvallis,  where  he  labored  as  minister  until  1889,  when  he  was  called 
to  Albina,  and  there  remained  for  five  years.  In  1894  he  accepted  a  call  from  the 
Riverside  Congregational  church  at  Hood  River  and  tor  ten  years  labored  untiringly  in 
that  field,  his  efforts  being  a  most  potent  force  in  promoting  the  moral  progress  of  the 
community.  He  won  the  love  of  the  people  of  all  denominations,  tor  he  is  a  man  not 
only  of  scholarly  attainments  but  of  broad  sympathy  and  has  the  faculty  of  calling 
forth  the  best  that  is  in  the  individual. 

From  1906  until  1917  Mr.  Hershner  was  assistant  superintendent  of  Congregational 
work  in  the  state  of  Washington.  In  1902  he  purchased  thirty-flve  acres  of  raw  land 
in  the  Hood  River  valley,  north  of  the  village  of  Van  Horn,  which  he  reclaimed  and 
developed,  planting  the  tract  to  apples  and  pears,  and  since  his  retirement  from  active 
ministerial  duties  he  has  given  a  large  part  o£  his  time  to  the  further  development  and 
improvement  of  his  orchard. 

In  1886  Mr.  Hershner  was  married  at  Monmouth,  Oregon,  to  Miss  Rachel  Loughary, 
a  daughter  of  a  pioneer  family  of  the  Willamette  valley.  The  children  of  this  marriage 
who  are  still  living  are:  Harold,  now  the  assistant  cashier  of  the  Butler  Bank  of  Hood 
River;  Leila  Zoe,  the  wife  of  Crawford  Lemmon  of  Yakima,  Washington;  Lawrence 
Scott,  who  is  a  student  in  the  University  of  Oregon;  and  Helen,  a  high  school  pupil 
at  The  Dalles.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hershner  have  reared  their  children  to  realize  that  good 
citizenship  must  be  shown  in  active  interest  in  public  affairs;  that  patriotism  is  not 
confined  to  the  singing  of  "My  Country  'Tis  of  Thee"  on  special  occasions;  that  the 
building  of  the  community  in  which  they  live,  the  betterment  of  local  conditions  and 
the  promotion  of  material,  moral  and  religious  improvement  of  each  community  is  a 
component  part  of  loyal  and  progressive  citizenship.  Following  these  teachings,  Harold 
Hershner  served  his  country  in  time  of  war  as  a  member  of  the  gallant  Ninety-first 
Division  of  the  American  Expeditionary  Forces,  doing  active  duty  in  France  and  Belgium 
and  winning  advancement  to  the  position  of  sergeant.  Returning  home  after  twenty-two 
months  of  service,  he  has  become  interested  in  civic  affairs  with  the  determination  to 
do  his  full  duty  to  his  country  in  days  of  peace  as  in  times  of  war  and  is  now  the 
treasurer  of  the  local  organization  of  the  American  Legion.  Lawrence  Hershner  also 
tendered  his  services  to  his  country  but  upon  physical  examination  was  put  in  the 
fourth  class  and  was  never  called.  Mrs.  Hershner  is  a  graduate  of  the  State  Normal 
School  and  following  the  completion  of  her  studies  there  became  a  member  of  the  faculty. 
She  is  now  a  member  of  the  Hood  River  Women's  Club  and  was  formerly  president  of 
the  Ladies'  Aid  Society  of  the  Congregational  church,  with  which  she  is  still  identified. 
She  is  likewise  a  past  worthy  matron  of  the  Eastern  Star.  Mr.  Hershner  is  a  Royal 
Arch  Mason  and  is  serving  as  chaplain  of  Hood  River  Lodge,  No.  105,  F.  &  A.  M.,  and 
is  past  worthy  patron  of  the  Eastern  Star,  while  twice  he  has  been  president  of  the 
Oregon  Congregational  Association.  His  life  has  been  of  distinct  value  to  the  state  in 
its  mental  and  moral  development. 


WILLIAM  J.  McCREADY. 


William  J.  McCready  was  born  in  Jones  county,  Iowa,  February  27,  1875.  His 
parents,  Robert  W.  and  Ellen  (Gault)  McCready,  were  prepared  as  teachers  and  taught 
in  the  schools  of  Wyoming,  Iowa,  and  other  places  until  1872,  when  they  located  on  a 
farm  near  Wyoming,  Iowa,  where  they  lived  for  many  years. 

William  McCready,  the  grandfather  of  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  a  pioneer  in 
Iowa.  Before  the  time  of  the  railroads,  he  and  his  wife  and  two  sons  traveled  by  way 
of  Burlington  to  Iowa  City  and  settled  there  in  the  year  1844.  The  same  year  he  fell 
a  victim  to  the  fever  with  which  the  country  was  infested  and  died.  The  family  went 
back  to  the  old  home  in  Ohio,  where  the  sons  were  educated  and  grew  to  manhood. 
Robert  W.  McCready  went  to  Iowa  again  in  1870  but  the  balance  of  the  family  remained 
in  Ohio.  The  McCreadys  came  to  this  country  from  Scotland  and  settled  in  or  near 
Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania,  about  1789,  and  many  of  the  family  live  there  at  this  date 
and  at  points  nearby  in  Ohio. 

William  J.  McCready  received  his  common  school  education  in  Oak  Hill  district 
school  near  the  home  farm.  He  attended  one  year  the  Savannah  Academy  in  Ohio,  a 
school  that  both  his  father  and  mother  attended  in  their  youth  and  of  which  an  uncle 


188  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

was  a  trustee  for  forty  years.  He  was  graduated  from  Lenox  College  in  Iowa  in  1895, 
and  from  tlie  law  department  of  the  University  of  Michigan  in  1900  with  the  degree 
of  LL.  B.  He  practiced  law  in  Cedar  Rapids.  Iowa,  until  1903,  when  he  became  cashier 
of  the  Onslow  Savings  Bank,  at  Onslow,  Iowa,  an  institution  which  he  helped  to  re- 
organize and  in  which  he  was  a  stockholder  and  director. 

The  same  year  Mr.  McCready  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  Copeland,  who  had  been  a 
schoolmate  of  his  at  Lenox  College.  To  them  were  born  three  children.  The  two  sons, 
Joseph  Robert  and  William  Wick,  are  in  school.  The  daughter,  Marian,  the  youngest 
of  the  family,  died  at  the  age  of  fourteen  months. 

In  1906  Mr.  McCready  finding  that  the  confining  work  of  the  banking  room  was 
doing  injury  to  his  health,  removed  with  his  family  to  Perry,  Iowa,  where  he  became 
actively  engaged  in  the  retail  lumber  business  as  secretary  of  the  Copeland  Lumber 
Company,  a  position  which  he  holds  at  the  present  time.  In  the  year  1910  the  Copeland 
Lumber  Company  sold  its  business  in  Iowa  and  its  owners,  consisting  of  Joseph  Cope- 
land, the  father  of  Mrs.  McCready,  his  two  sons,  L.  A.  Copeland  and  J.  W.  Copeland,  and 
W.  J.  McCready,  came  to  Oregon  and  settled  at  Hood  River  and  invested  in  the  apple 
business.  This  move  proved  a  bad  one.  All  lost  heavily.  But  in  1914  the  same  owners 
organized  anew  the  Copeland  Lumber  Company  in  Oregon  and  have  not  only  recovered 
their  losses  but  have  met  with  abundant  success.  The  Copeland  Lumber  Company  now 
has  fourteen  retail  stores  of  lumber  and  has  a  paid  up  capital  of  over  three  hundred 
thousand  dollars. 

W.  J.  McCready  is  known  in  Forest  Grove  as  a  good  booster.  He  has  served  number- 
less times  on  the  Commercial  Club  of  the  city,  has  been  a  member  of  the  city  council, 
and  served  as  local  chairman  of  the  Liberty  Loan  drives.  He  is  an  Odd  Fellow  and  a 
lite  member  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  Lodge. 

Mrs.  W.  J.  McCready  was  graduated  from  Lenox  College  and  received  the  degree 
of  Master  of  Science.  She  taught  in  that  college  for  a  number  of  years  and  was  pre- 
ceptress of  Clarke  Hall,  the  ladies'  dormitory.  She  is  a  member  of  Chapter  D  of  the 
P.  E.  0.  sisterhood  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Monday  Club  and  takes  an  active  interest 
in  promoting  the  welfare  of  the  schools  of  the  community,  but  her  chief  delight  is  in 
the  keeping  of  her  home  and  in  the  education  and  training  of  her  two  sons. 


HARMON    J.    McLIN. 


For  many  years  Harmon  J.  McLin,  who  passed  away  February  1,  1920.  was  iden- 
tified with  the  farming  interests  of  Oregon  but  spent  his  last  days  in  Portland  in  the 
enjoyment  of  well  earned  rest.  He  was  a  native  son  of  this  state,  his  birth  having 
occurred  in  Washington  county,  March  10,  1852.  His  parents  were  William  and 
Rasana  McLin,  who  were  natives  of  Missouri  and  who  crossed  the  plains  in  1844, 
settling  in  Washington  county,  Oregon,  where  the  father  took  up  a  donation  claim 
of  six  hundred  and  forty  acres  situated  about  two  and  a  half  miles  southwest  of  Hills- 
boro.  On  the  farm  which  he  there  developed  and  improved  he  and  his  wife  spent 
their    remaining    days. 

It  was  on  the  old  homestead  that  Harmon  J.  McLln  was  born  and  reared  and  in 
the  district  schools  he  acquired  his  education.  His  training  was  that  of  the  farm 
bred  boy  and  he  early  became  familiar  with  the  best  methods  of  tilling  the  soil  and 
caring  for  the  crops.  He  was  also  married  at  the  old  homestead  in  1S77  to  Miss 
Drusilla  Constable,  who  was  born  in  Oregon  in  1S5S,  a  daughter  of  Edward  and 
Brazilla  (Arthur)  Constable,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Kentucky.  They  removed 
to  Missouri  in  early  life  and  from  that  state  crossed  the  plains  to  Oregon  in  1843. 
braving  the  dangers  of  a  trip  of  that  character  and  at  a  period  when  one  could  travel 
for  hundreds  of  miles  without  seeing  a  habitation  and  for  equal  distances  without 
seeing  a  white  man,  for  the  Indians  were  then  far  more  numerous  than  the  white 
settlers  throughout  the  entire  west.  After  reaching  his  destination  her  father  secured 
a  claim  in  Washington  county,  five  and  a  half  miles  northeast  of  Hillsboro,  and 
thereon  he  and  his  wife  spent  their  remaining  days  save  for  their  last  six  years,  which 
were  passed  in  Hillsboro.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  McLin  began  their  domestic  life  on  the  old 
homestead,  where  they  lived  until  about  1906.  Mr.  McLin  carefully  and  systematically 
developed  and  improved  his  farm,  converting  it  into  a  very  productive  tract  of  land 
and  gathering  therefrom  large  harvests  as  the  years  passed.  In  1906.  however,  he 
removed    with   his   family   to   Portland,   where    his    widow   has    since   made   her   home 


HARMON   J.    McLIN 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  191 

and  where  he  continued  to  reside  until  called  to  his  final  rest.  While  he  was  living 
on  the  farm  he  served  as  school  director  for  eight  years  in  District  No.  1,  near  his  place 
of  residence.  This  was  the  first  school  in  Washington  county  and  during  his  term 
as  a  director  a  new  schoolhouse  was  built  and  the  first  large  bell  in  that  part  of  the 
state  installed.  The  first  organ  used  in  that  section  was  put  into  the  schoolhouse 
and  is  still  there. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  McLin  were  born  four  daughters:  Myrtle  and  Minnie,  twins, 
the  former  now  the  wife  of  F.  E.  Griffith  of  Portland  and  the  latter  the  wife  of  L.  A. 
Bill  of  Portland;  Agatha,  the  wife  of  G.  C.  Gibson  of  Portland;  and  Grace,  the  wife 
of  R.   D.  Handibo,  a  resident  of  Dunsmuir,  California. 

Mr.  McLin  was  a  lifelong  democrat,  always  giving  strong  support  to  the  party 
and  with  firm  belief  in  its  principles.  He  belonged  to  the  Native  Sons  of  Oregon 
during  the  existence  of  that  society,  was  a  faithful  member  of  the  Grange  and  a  con- 
sistent representative  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Good  Templars,  which  indicated 
his  position  on  the  temperance  question.  It  was  practically  impossible  for  Mr.  McLin 
to  visit  any  section  of  the  Pacific  coast  country  where  he  did  not  have  friends  or 
acquaintances,  so  widely  was  he  known,  and  his  death,  which  occurred  February  1, 
1920,  was  the  occasion  of  deep  and  widespread  regret. 


JARVIS  VARNEL  BEACH. 


Jarvis  Varnel  Beach,  well  known  attorney  and  business  man  of  Portland,  was  born 
in  Millport,  Missouri,  January  31,  1854.  His  father,  Harvey  H.  Beach,  was  a  native 
of  New  York,  his  birth  having  occurred  on  a  farm  in  Saratoga  county  in  1810.  In 
early  manhood  he  removed  to  Missouri  and  there  married  Eleanor  Isabella  Henry. 
He  was  at  one  time  county  judge  of  Knox  county,  Missouri,  and  he  passed  away  in 
1860,  having  for  about  six  years  survived  his  wife,  whose  death  occurred  in  1854. 

Jarvis  V.  Beach  was  but  an  infant  at  the  time  of  his  mother's  demise  and  he 
was  reared  in  Millport,  Missouri,  by  his  stepmother,  attending  the  country  schools  in 
his  youthful  days  and  afterward  pursuing  a  course  in  the  normal  school  at  Kirksville, 
Missouri.  He  next  entered  the  Christian  University  at  Canton,  Missouri,  and  there 
pursued  his  studies  until  1876,  when  he  went  to  Tulare  county,  California,  where  he 
taught  school  for  three  years.  During  that  period  he  devoted  the  hours  that  are  usually 
termed  leisure  to  the  study  of  law  and  after  thorough  preliminary  reading  was  admitted 
to  practice  at  the  California  bar  in  1879.  Believing  that  Portland  offered  an  excellent 
field  of  labor  to  the  ambitious  young  lawyer,  he  then  removed  to  this  city  and  through 
the  intervening  years  has  continued  in  practice  here,  covering  a  period  of  more  than 
four  decades.  It  was  not  long  until  he  had  secured  a  good  clientage  and  his  ability 
has  kept  him  constantly  before  the  public  as  a  leading  lawyer.  He  has  been  connected 
with  much  important  litigation,  analyzes  his  cases  very  thoroughly,  is  seldom,  if  ever, 
at  fault  in  the  application  of  a  legal  principle  and  carries  conviction  to  the  minds  of 
judge  and  jury  by  his  clear  reasoning  and  his  logical  arrangement  of  facts.  Into  the 
field  of  business  he  has  also  extended  his  efforts  and  is  now  a  director  of  the  Star  Sand 
Company,  of  the  Columbia  Arms  Investment  Company  and  the  Greater  Portland  Realty 
Company  and  of  the  last  named  is  also  the  president.  His  business  activities  of  this 
character  have  contributed  in  substantial  measure  to  his  success.  At  the  same  time 
he  has  always  maintained  a  place  among  the  foremost  representatives  of  the  bar  and 
since  1895  has  practiced  as  senior  partner  of  the  firm  of  Beach  &  Simon. 

On  the  14th  of  June,  1888,  in  Marion  county,  Oregon,  Mr.  Beach  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Agnes  Olympia  Cole  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  a  son, 
Varnel  Cole,  who  was  born  in  November,  1889,  and  is  now  a  Harvard  graduate.  At 
the  present  time  he  is  engaged  in  the  lumber  business  in  Portland.  He  was  married 
in  this  city  on  the  30th  of  December,  1918,  to  Miss  Virginia  Menefee  and  they  have 
one  son,  Varnel  Lee,  whose  birth  occurred   in  1920. 

Mr.  Beach  attends  the  Presbyterian  church  and  he  belongs  to  the  Independent 
Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  also  to  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  His  political  allegiance 
is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  for  four  or  five  years  in  the  late  '80s  he  filled  the 
office  of  city  attorney  of  East  Portland.  He  was  also  city  attorney  of  the  city  of  Port- 
land for  one  term  in  the  '90s  and  in  1917  retired  from  the  Portland  school  board  after 
many  years  as  a  member  of  that  body,  during  which  time  he  did  active  and  effective 
work   toward    furthering   the    interests   of   public   education    in    this    city.     During   the 


192  HISTORY  OP  OREGON 

World  war  period  he  served  on  the  legal  advisory  board.  Throughout  his  entire  life 
he  has  done  with  his  might  what  his  hand  has  found  to  do.  The  duty  nearest  has 
ceen  the  one  which  has  claimed  his  attention  and  from  the  faithful  performance  of  each 
task  that  has  come  to  him  he  has  found  courage  and  inspiration  for  the  labors  of  the 
succeeding  day.  Thus  he  has  made  his  life  count  for  the  utmost  and  his  efforts  have 
been  an  element  in  Portland's  steady  advancement  along  many  lines. 


ALVIN  W.  BAIRD,  M.  D. 


Dr.  Alvin  W.  Baird,  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  and  surgery  in  Portland 
was  born  in  San  Mateo  county,  California.  His  father,  Curtis  Baird,  was  a  native  of 
New  York.  His  mother's  maiden  name  was  Rachel  Whisman,  a  native  of  Missouri. 
They  were  both  pioneers  in  California  where  they  were  married  and  lived  until  1877 
when  they  came  to  Oregon,  establishing  their  home  in  Oregon  City.  The  father  died  in 
1906,  while  the  mother  passed  away  in  1910. 

Dr.  Baird  pursued  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  California  and 
Oregon  and  afterward  spent  two  years  as  a  student  in  McMinnville  College  at  McMinn- 
ville,  Oregon.  He  entered  Leland  Stanford,  Jr.,  University,  California,  in  1897;  grad- 
uated with  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree  with  the  class  of  1901.  He  entered  the  medical 
department  of  Cornell  University,  New  York,  in  1901,  from  which  he  was  graduated 
with  the  class  of  1905.  During  the  years  of  his  medical  studies  he  was  assistant  instructor 
of  physiology  in  the  medical  department  of  Cornell  University,  having  specialized  in 
physiology  while  at  Stanford.  Following  his  graduation  he  spent  two  years  in  residence 
In  the  Presbyterian  Hospital  in  New  York  city  and  was  there  graduated  in  1907.  In 
the  latter  year  he  opened  an  office  in  Portland  and  through  the  intervening  period  has 
devoted  his  attention  to  the  practice  of  both  medicine  and  surgery.  He  is  a  member  o£ 
the  Portland  City  and  County  Medical  Society,  the  Oregon  State  Medical  Association, 
the  American  Medical  Association,  the  North  Pacific  Surgical  Association,  and  the 
American  College  of  Surgeons,  of  which  he  is  a  fellow.  He  has  been  attending  surgeon 
of  the  Multnomah  Hospital  of  Portland  ever  since  its  inception.  He  has  been  connected 
with  the  teaching  staff  in  surgery  in  the  medical  school  of  the  University  of  Oregon  at 
Portland  since  1907  and  for  about  eight  years  has  been  assistant  professor  of  surgery  in 
that  institution.  In  1918-1919  he  was  professor  of  physiology  in  the  North  Pacific  Col- 
lege of  Dentistry  and  Pharmacy  of  Portland. 

On  the  16th  of  March,  1914,  in  Newburgh,  New  York,  Dr.  Baird  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Monell,  a  daughter  of  the  late  John  P.  Monell,  a  native 
of  the  Empire  state.  They  have  one  son,  Walter  Monell  Baird,  who  was  born  July  5, 
1915,  and  a  daughter,  Elizabeth  Monell,  born  March  10,  1920.  Dr.  Baird  is  a  member 
of  the  Phi  Alpha  Sigma,  a  medical  college  fraternity,  and  a  member  of  the  honorary 
society  of  Sigma  Psi.  During  the  period  of  the  World  war  he  was  a  member  of  Ad- 
visory Board,  No.  20,  of  Oregon,  was  also  a  member  of  the  medical  section  of  the  state 
Council  of  Defense  and  a  member  of  the  Volunteer  Medical  Service. 


CHARLES  VICTOR  FISHER,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Charles  Victor  Fisher,  a  physician  of  Klamath  county,  now  residing  in  Klamath 
Falls,  was  born  in  Butler  county,  Pennsylvania,  in  1870,  a  son  of  W.  S.  and  Elizabeth 
(Kelty)  Fisher.  The  Fisher  family  were  of  German  extraction  and  came  to  America 
in  the  early  days  of  the  republic.  The  name  was  originally  spelled  Fischer  but  the 
American  born  members  of  the  family,  who  were  among  the  early  pioneers  of  Virginia 
and  Pennsylvania,  changed  it  by  dropping  the  "c."  The  Keltys  were  of  Scotch  an- 
cestry, the  great-grandfather  of  the  Doctor  having  settled  in  Pennsylvania  at  an  early 
day. 

Dr.  Fisher  was  educated  in  Pennsylvania  and  Nebraska,  where  he  had  removed 
with  his  parents  in  1885.  In  1890  he  came  to  Oregon,  making  his  home  in  Salem, 
where  he  attended  Willamette  University  Academy,  from  which  he  gi'aduated  in  1895.  He 
then  entered  the  medical  department  of  that  institution  from  which  he  was  graduated 
in  1898  with  the  degree  of  M.  D.  He  opened  offices  in  Dallas,  where  he  practiced  for 
two  years  before  removing  to  Roseburg,  in  which  town  he  followed  his  profession  for 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  193 

tour  years.  About  that  time  his  wife's  health  failed  and  it  was  necessary  for  her  to 
change  climate  so  he  removed  to  Antioch,  California,  and  there  remained  for  three 
years.  In  1908  he  located  in  Klamath  Palls,  Oregon,  and.  having  found  climatic  con- 
ditions exactly  suited  to  his  wife's  health,  has  since  made  his  home  in  that  city. 
While  strongly  inclined  to  specialize  in  his  profession.  Dr.  Fisher  remained  in  general 
practice  until  1911,  when  he  became  an  eye,  ear,  nose  and  throat  specialist,  and  has 
built  up  a  large  practice  in  this  connection.  A  devoted  student  of  his  profession,  he 
has  taken  frequent  postgraduate  courses,  in  1898  at  the  Chicago  Post  Graduate  Hospital; 
in  1905  and  1909  at  the  San  Francisco  Polyclinic;  and  in  1915  at  the  Post  Graduate 
Medical  School  of  New  York.  The  breaking  out  of  the  World  war  frustrated  his  plans 
tor  going  to  Europe  to  take  a  postgraduate  course  in  his  specialty  but  he  is  now  con- 
templating making  the  trip  as  soon  as  conditions  will  allow. 

In  1900  occurred  the  marriage  of  Dr.  Fisher  and  Miss  Flora  Chesney,  a  member  of 
one  of  Oregon's  foremost  pioneer  families.  Mrs.  Fisher  is  a  talented  woman  who  takes 
much  interest  in  social  and  club  affairs  and  is  a  member  of  the  Klamath  Falls  P.  E.  0. 
sisterhood.  She  is  active  in  church  work  and  Is  a  consistent  member  of  the  Methodist 
church.  One  daughter  has  been  born  to  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Fisher,  Constance,  who  is  a  high 
school  pupil  and  is  a  musician  of  ability  and  a  brilliant  student. 

Fraternally  Dr.  Fisher  is  identified  with  the  Elks  and  Woodmen  of  the  World.  He 
has  affiliated  with  other  fraternal  organizations  but  the  demands  of  his  profession  have 
compelled  his,  withdrawal.  He  is  a  cultured  and  dignified  gentleman  and  one  would 
hardly  connect  him  with  one  of  the  yell  leaders  who  in  former  days  energetically  directed 
the  cheering  of  the  student  body  at  Willamette  University.  In  the  line  of  his  pro- 
fession Dr.  Fisher  is  a  member  of  the  Southern  Oregon  Medical  Society,  of  which  he 
was  vice  president;  the  Oregon  State  Medical  Society;  and  he  is  a  fellow  of  the  Ameri- 
can Medical  Association. 


CHARLES  O.  HUELAT. 


Prominent  among  the  energetic,  larsighted  and  successful  business  men  of  Hood 
River  is  Charles  O.  Huelat,  who  is  a  native  son  of  the  northwest,  his  birth  having  oc- 
curred at  Silver  City,  Idaho,  in  1873.  His  parents  were  John  and  Sarah  E.  (Belt) 
Huelat,  the  latter  a  daughter  of  Dr.  A.  M.  Belt,  one  of  Oregon's  pioneer  physicians, 
who  crossed  the  plains  with  an  ox  team  and  wagon  in  the  late  '40s  from  his  native 
state  of  Missouri.  He  was  a  prominent  Mason  and  at  one  time  was  grand  master  of 
the  Grand  Lodge  of  Masons  in  the  State  of  Oregon. 

Charles  O.  Huelat  was  educated  at  Salem,  Oregon,  and  early  turned  his  attention 
to  the  dry  goods  business,  to  which  he  has  devoted  much  of  his  lite.  He  continued 
active  in  that  field  of  labor  in  Salem  for  ten  years  and  then  removed  to  Heppner, 
Oregon,  to  become  manager  of  a  general  merchandise  store  in  that  city.  He  subse- 
quently purchased  the  store  but  after  four  years  of  close  confinement  was  forced  to  give 
up  the  store  and  go  to  California  on  account  of  declining  health.  He  remained  there 
for  two  years,  during  which  time  he  embraced  the  Christian  Science  faith.  Thoroughly 
restored  to  health  he  returned  to  Heppner  and  in  association  with  G.  A.  Molden  estab- 
lished another  business.  In  1911  he  came  to  Hood  River  and  purchased  an  interest  in 
the  Bragg  Mercantile  Company,  which  in  1918  was  reorganized  under  the  name  of 
the  Molden-Huelat-Sather  Company,  Mr.  Huelat  becoming  the  president,  with  Mr.  Molden 
as  secretary  and  treasurer  and  J.  F.  Sather  as  vice  president.  The  company  occupies 
a  handsome  business  block  on  Oak  street,  where  they  carry  a  complete  stock  of  dry 
goods,  shoes,  clothing  and  furnishings.  The  store  covers  about  fourteen  thousand 
square  feet  and  there  is  a  mezzanine  floor,  on  which  are  located  the  offices  and  art 
needle  work  department.  Their  trade  comes  from  all  the  surrounding  country,  includ- 
ing the  different  towns  along  the  Columbia  river  in  Washington. 

In  1903  Mr.  Huelat  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Lona  White,  a  daughter  of  E. 
H.  White,  a  pioneer  retired  farmer  now  living  in  Salem,  Oregon,  who  is  a  prominent 
Grand  Army  man,  having  faithfully  served  his  country  in  defense  of  the  Union  during 
the  dark  days  of  the  Civil  war.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Huelat  have  one  son,  Paul  Burnett,  a 
high  school  pupil. 

Mr.  Huelat  is  president  of  the  Merchants  Association  of  Hood  River  and  belongs  to 
the  Hood  River  Commercial  Club.  He  is  prominent  in  all  public  affairs  and  was  particu- 
larlv  active  in  all  the  war  drives.     He   is   a   devout  member   of  the  Christian   Science 


194  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

church  and  its  second  reader.  Mrs.  Huelat  is  a  woman  of  much  talent.  She  possesses 
a  fine  voice  and  is  ever  ready  to  give  her  aid  to  any  charitable  cause.  She  is  the  first 
reader  of  the  Christian  Science  church,  is  president  of  the  Hood  River  Woman's  Club 
and  occupies  an  enviable  position  in  both  church  and  social  circles,  the  sterling  worth 
of  her  character  being  widely  recognized. 


CHRISTOPHER    COLUMBUS    McCOY. 

In  the  death  of  Christopher  Columbus  McCoy  on  the  ISth  of  October,  1905,  the 
northwest  chronicled  the  passing  of  one  who  had  long  been  a  prominent  figure  in 
connection  not  only  with  the  history  of  Oregon  but  of  the  entire  Pacific  coast  country 
from  Alaska  to  San  Francisco.  In  pioneer  times  he  became  a  mail  agent  and  con- 
tinued in  the  Ijusiness,  constantly  broadening  its  scope  until  in  1893  he  had  over  three 
hundred  mail  routes.  He  was  born  in  New  Hampshire,  January  31,  1836,  and  was 
a  son  of  Israel  and  Martha  (Hall)  McCoy.  The  father  was  born  in  Canada  in  1792 
and  died  in  the  '60s.  The  mother,  who  was  a  native  of  New  Hampshire,  born 
August  18,  1797,  passed  away  March  25,  1842.  The  son,  C.  C.  McCoy,  was  but  six  years 
of  age  at  the  time  of  his  mother's  death.  He  was  reared  in  the  east  and  in  early  life 
was  in  charge  of  bottling  works  for  the  firm  of  Fairbanks  &  Beards  of  Boston.  He 
came  to  the  Pacific  coast  in  1S55,  at  which  time  the  work  of  development  had  been 
carried  forward  but  slightly.  He  arrived  In  San  Francisco  when  it  was  a  compara- 
tively small  and  unimportant  place  and  from  that  time  forward  was  closely  associated 
with  western  interests  and  became  one  of  the  best  known  figures  on  the  Pacific  coast. 
He  secured  a  position  as  omnibus  driver  for  one  of  the  leading  hotels  of  San  Fran- 
cisco but  was  attracted  by  the  gold  discoveries  to  the  north  and  started  for  Alaska. 
On  reaching  Victoria,  B.  C,  which  was  then  a  small  hamlet  containing  only  one 
store  besides  the  buildings  of  the  Hudson  Bay  Company,  he  heard  of  the  gold  dis- 
coveries at  Fraser  river  and  decided  to  try  his  fortune  there.  On  the  way  he  had 
purchased  at  the  store  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  some  so-called  self-raising  flour, 
and  he  often  humorously  related  that  after  reaching  the  mouth  of  the  Fraser  they 
landed  and  began  to  cook  with  that  self-raising  flour,  but  it  would  not  raise  worth  a 
cent,  "and  the  flapjacks  we  manufactured  out  of  it  stuck  like  glue  to  the  cottonwood 
logs  we  spread  them  on."  On  the  29th  of  April,  185S,  the  party  with  which  Mr.  McCoy 
traveled  reached  Hill's  bar  and  it  was  not  long  after  that  the  first  steamer  made  its 
way  up  the  waters  of  the  Fraser,  having  come  from  Sacramento  in  May,  185S.  The 
vessel  was  called  the  Surprise  and  was  piloted  up  the  river  by  a  big  Indian,  whose 
head  the  passengers  had  adorned  with  a  tall  silk  hat.  Other  vessels  soon  made  the 
trip,   the   second   being   the    Seabird   and   the   third   the  Wright. 

Mr.  McCoy  was  the  first  man  to  engage  in  the  express  business  in  British  Colum- 
bia, but  the  following  year  he  sold  out  to  the  firm  of  Kent  &  Smith.  He  was  also 
one  of  the  first  party  to  reach  the  Cariboo  mines  in  the  fall  of  1859  and  he  kept  a  store 
in  that  vicinity  where  he  sold  gum  boots  at  seventy-five  dollars  per  pair,  nails  at 
seventy-five  cents  per  pound  and  canvas  at  eight  dollars  per  yard.  His  reminiscences 
of  pioneer  times  throughout  the  Pacific  coast  country  were  always  most  interesting 
and  gave  a  clear  and  vivid  picture  of  conditions  that  then  existed.  Not  finding  the 
gold  he  had  expected  in  the  Fraser  River  district,  he  returned  to  Bellingham  Bay 
in  1S58  and  assisted  in  mapping  out  the  present  city  of  Bellingham  on  the  Lower 
Sound.  He  then  became  interested  in  steam  navigation  to  the  gold  fields  and  accom- 
panied Captain  Roeder  on  an  expedition  up  the  Fraser  with  the  first  steamer  to  ply 
its  waters.  Port  Hope  was  reached  and  a  plan  was  formed  to  make  an  overland  trail 
from  the  Sound  to  that  point  by  a  shorter  route.  Mr.  McCoy  undertook  the  super- 
vision of  the  work  and  afterward  established  the  first  express  line  from  Whatcom,  as 
Bellingham  was  then  called,  to  the  diggings.  This  did  not  bring  the  anticipated  finan- 
cial success,  however,  and  after  a  few  years  Mr.  McCoy  returned  to  the  States,  settling 
at  Baker  City,  Oregon,  in  1871.  A  year  afterward  he  removed  to  Walla  Walla,  where 
for  twenty-five  years  he  made  his  home  and  during  this  period  was  manager  of  stage 
lines  extending  into  Idaho  and  carrying  the  United  States  mails,  which  were  con- 
veyed either  in  the  boot  of  the  stage  or  by  pony  express.  Territory  contracting  gave 
Mr.  McCoy  an  insight  into  government  business  and  eventually  led  him  to  secure  a 
contract  for  carrying  mails  from  the  post  office  to  the  ferries  and  depots,  known  as  the 
city  service.    He  was  at  one  time  president  of  the  Northwestern  Steamship  &  Transpor- 


CHRISTOPHER   C.   McCOY 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  197 

tation  Company  of  Portland  and  in  1893  was  in  charge  of  over  three  hundred  mail 
routes.  His  last  years  were  spent  in  Portland  and  thus  he  returned  to  the  city  with 
the  business  interests  of  which  he  had  been   identified  in  early  pioneer  times. 

It  was  in  1871,  in  Baker  City,  Oregon,  that  Mr.  McCoy  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Martha  Walker,,  who  survives  him  and  yet  makes  her  home  in  Portland,  where 
the  death  of  Mr.  McCoy  occurred  on  the  18th  of  October,  1905.  He  was  a  well  known 
member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  when  he  was  laid  to  rest  in  the 
cemetery  at  Walla  Walla  many  of  his  brethren  of  the  fraternity  attended  the  funeral. 
He  had  been  a  charter  member  of  Walla  Walla  Lodge  and  the  order  paid  its  last 
tribute  to  the  man  who  aided  in  making  history  on  the  Pacific  coast.  There  was  no 
phase  of  pioneer  development  or  experience  in  the  northwest  with  which  Mr.  McCoy 
was  not  familiar  and  there  was  no  man  more  thoroughly  acquainted  with  mail  service 
interests  and  the  development  of  stage  lines  than  he.  In  his  later  years  he  main- 
tained an  office  as  mail  service  attorney  in  the  Worcester  block  in  Portland  and  also 
had  an  eastern  office  in  Washington,  D.  C,  with  Finley  &  Zeverly  as  associates.  To 
talk  with  him  concerning  pioneer  times  was  to  receive  a  most  interesting  account  of 
the  early  days  with  their  hardships,  trials  and  privations,  their  excitement  and  their 
opportunities.  He  was  in  every  way  familiar  with  the  development  of  the  north- 
west and  took  a  most  important  part  in  framing  the  history  of  this  section  of  the 
country. 


TRUVELLE  De  LARHUE. 


Truvelle  De  Larhue,  who  is  a  well  known  ophthalmologist  of  The  Dalles,  was  born 
in  Iowa  in  1894,  his  parents  being  D.  C.  and  Blanche  (Wolgamott)  De  Larhue,  both 
of  whom  were  natives  of  France.  The  father  was  for  many  years  the  commercial 
agent  of  France  in  the  United  States.  D.  C.  De  Larhue  died  when  his  son  Truvelle  was 
a  small  lad  and  the  mother  afterwards  removed  to  Montana,  in  which  state  Truvelle 
Acquired  his  primary  education.  Later  the  family  came  to  Oregon  and  the  young  man 
completed  his  studies  in  Portland,  where  he  took  up  the  profession  of  ophthalmology. 
He  was  graduated  from  the  De  Keyser  Institute  at  Portland  in  1919.  Learning  that 
there  was  no  exclusive  optometrist  practicing  between  Portland  and  Pendleton,  he 
traveled  over  the  country  in  search  of  a  location  that  would  furnish  an  excellent  climate 
and  other  attractive  attributes.  He  selected  The  Dalles  and  opened  an  oflBce  in  the 
Vogt  block  on  Second  street,  where  he  has  since  served  the  people  of  Wasco  and  sur- 
rounding counties  on  both  sides  of  the  Columbia  river,  gaining  an  excellent  practice 
and  a  well  deserved  reputation. 

In  1916  Dr.  De  Larhue  was  married  to  Miss  Luella  Nagues  of  Meagher  county, 
Montana,  a  daughter  of  George  Nagues,  a  well  known  and  successful  cattle  breeder  of 
that  section,  who  was  also  for  years  a  prominent  political  factor  in  Montana  and  has 
for  the  past  decade  occupied  the  post  of  sheriff,  being  elected  several  times  to  the 
office  without  opposition.  Mr.  Nagues  has  held  various  other  public  offices  in  Meagher 
county,  including  that  of  county  commissioner. 

Dr.  De  Larhue  tendered  his  services  to  the  government  in  the  World  war,  but 
was  placed  in  class  2  and  was  never  called.  He  confines  his  attention  to  his  professional 
interests  and  duties  and  is  thoroughly  equipped  for  the  scientific  examination  of  the 
eye,  having  studied  broadly  along  this  line.  He  treats  all  errors  of  the  eye  through 
the  use  of  lenses  but  performs  no  surgical  operations,  holding  that  such  is  the  work 
of  a  graduate  surgeon.  This  ethical  position  which  he  has  taken  has  very  properly  won 
for  him  many  friends  in  the  medical  profession.  He  is  enjoying  an  extensive  practice 
and  at  the  same  time  has  won  the  high  regard  of  all  with  whom  professional  and  social 
relations  have  brought  him  into  contact  since  becoming  a  resident  of  The  Dalles. 


GENERAL  WILLIAM  HOLMAN  ODELL. 

It  is  imperative  that  mention  be  made  of  General  William  Holman  Odell,  who  in 
large  measure  left  the  impress  of  his  individuality  upon  the  pioneer  history  and  later 
development  of  Oregon.  He  was  born  in  Carroll  county,  Indiana,  December  25,  1830, 
his  parents  being  John   and   Sarah    (Holman)    Odell.     The   father   was   born    in    South 


198  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

Carolina,  April  21,  1799,  and  in  1803  accompanied  his  parents  to  Wayne  county,  Ohio, 
while  in  1808  a  removal  was  made  to  Wayne  county,  Indiana,  where  John  Odell  grew 
to  manhood,  and  there  on  the  30th  of  March,  1820,  he  was  married  to  Sarah  Holman, 
who  was  born  in  Kentucky,  December  10,  1803.  The  death  of  John  Odell  occurred 
March  31,  1869,  while  his  widow  survived  for  a  number  of  years,  passing  away  Jan- 
uary 1,  1887. 

William  H.  Odell  pursued  his  education  in  the  district  schools  of  Indiana  and  also 
spent  two  years  as  a  student  in  Willamette  University  at  Salem,  Oregon,  following 
the  removal  of  the  family  to  the  northwest.  On  starting  out  in  the  business  world 
W.  H.  Odell  spent  five  years  as  a  farmer  ot  Yamhill  county,  Oregon,  and  subsequent 
to  his  first  marriage  he  took  up  the  profession  of  teaching,  being  for  three  years  a 
teacher  in  the  Santiam  Academy  in  Lebanon.  For  a  year  he  was  a  public  school 
teacher  in  Albany,  Oregon,  and  in  1864  removed  to  Eugene,  where  he  accepted  the 
position  of  United  States  deputy  surveyor  of  public  lands.  In  this  connection  he 
explored  and  surveyed  the  line  ot  road  for  the  Willamette  Military  Wagon  Road  Com- 
pany, from  Eugene  via  the  middle  fork  of  the  Willamette  to  the  eastern  terminus. 
He  also  superintended  the  construction  of  the  road  from  Crescent  lake  eastward  to 
the  Idaho  line.  In  1871  he  was  appointed  to  the  position  of  surveyor  general  of  the 
district  ot  Oregon  and  in  1876  was  chosen  the  presidential  elector  and  carried  the  re- 
turns to  Washington.  He  spent  the  winter  in  the  national  capital  and  witnessed  the 
inauguration  of  President  Hayes. 

Following  his  return  to  Oregon,  Mr.  Odell  in  1877  purchased  the  Oregon  Statesman 
which  he  published  for  six  years.  In  the  interim  he  served  for  two  years  as  state 
printer,  filling  out  an  unexpired  term,  his  predecessor  in  the  otBce  having  died.  In 
1885  General  Odell  was  appointed  postmaster  at  Salem  and  occupied  the  position  for 
four  years.  In  1891-2  he  was  employed  as  locating  engineer  in  the  allotment  of  lands 
to  the  Indians  on  the  Siletz  reservation  and  was  appointed  a  commissioner  in  conjunc- 
tion with  Judge  R.  P.  Boise  and  Colonel  Harding  to  negotiate  a  treaty  with  the  Indians 
for  the  sale  of  the  lands  not  allotted  on  the  reservation.  He  was  again  called  to  public 
office  when  in  1895  he  was  elected  clerk  of  the  state  land  board  and  occupied  that 
position  for  four  years.  Since  the  expiration  of  his  term,  or  1899,  he  has  lived  retired, 
enjoying  a  well  earned  rest.  His  life  has  largely  been  devoted  to  public  service  and 
has  at  all  times  been  characterized  by  the  utmost  fidelity  to  duty  in  every  relation. 
The  cause  ot  education  has  ever  found  in  him  a  stalwart  champion  and  for  sixteen 
years,  ending  in  1904,  he  was  a  member  of  the  board  of  trustees  and  president  of  the 
board  ot  Willamette  University. 

On  the  16th  of  October,  1855,  Mr.  Odell  was  united  in  marriage  to  Elizabeth  F. 
McLench,  who  was  born  in  Kennebec  county,  Maine,  December  23,  1816,  and  passed 
away  at  Portland,  Oregon,  March  31,  1890.  In  1844  she  became  the  wife  of  Samuel  R. 
Thurston  and  in  1846  they  removed  to  Iowa,  living  in  Burlington  for  a  year  and  then 
crossing  the  plains  in  1847.  They  resided  at  Oregon  City  until  Mr.  Thurston  was  elected 
a  delegate  to  congress  and  she  remained  in  the  west,  meeting  the  hardships  and  diffi- 
culties of  frontier  life  in  order  to  care  for  their  little  family  and  aid  in  the  pioneer 
development  of  the  region  while  her  husband  was  absent  from  home  on  the  duties 
that  took  him  to  Washington.  While  he  was  on  the  return  trip  in  1851,  death  called 
him.  In  1853  his  widow  became  preceptress  in  Willamette  University  and  filled  the 
position  for  two  years,  bringing  to  her  educational  work  unusual  ability,  both  natural 
and  acquired.  She  had  not  only  been  well  trained  in  the  English  branches  of  learning 
but  was  also  proficient  in  Latin,  Italian,  French  and  Spanish.  In  1855  she  became  the 
wife  of  W.  H.  Odell  and  accompanied  her  husband  on  various  removals  previously  in- 
dicated in  this  record.  After  the  family  home  was  established  in  Eugene  in  1864  Mr. 
Odell,  then  engaged  in  civil  engineering,  was  necessarily  much  from  home  and  to 
beguile  the  hours  Mrs.  Odell  opened  a  private  school.  In  1877  they  removed  to  Salem 
and  in  1889  went  to  live  with  their  daughter,  Mrs.  Stowell,  in  Portland,  where  about 
a  year  later  Mrs.  Odell  passed  away.  Her  pallbearers  were  some  of  the  most  distin- 
guished men  of  the  state,  who  thus  paid  their  last  tribute  of  respect  to  one  whose  career 
was  typical  of  American  Christian  womanhood.  By  her  first  marriage  she  had  a  son, 
George  H.  Thurston,  and  a  daughter,  Mrs.  A.  W.  Stowell,  deceased. 

Four  years  later,  on  the  23d  ot  May,  1894,  General  Odell  was  married  to  Mrs.  Carrie 
Bright  Taylor,  who  was  born  July  29,  1834,  and  was  left  an  orphan  in  infancy.  She  was 
reared  as  a  member  of  Dr.  Walker's  family  in  Kentucky,  and  after  attending  the  public 
schools  she  became  a  student  in  Columbia  College  and  was  graduated  in  English,  Latin 
and  music.     She  taught  for  five  years  in  country  schools  and  for  two  years  in  Columbia 


I 


HISTOKY  OF  OKEGON  199 

College,  and  in  1861  she  became  the  wife  of  Dr.  James  Gwinn  Taylor  who  passed  away 
August  11,  1889.  Five  years  later  she  became  the  wife  of  General  Odell  and  for  twenty- 
five  years  they  traveled  life's  journey  happily  together,  the  death  of  Mrs.  Odell  occurring 
July  4,  1919.  The  funeral  service  bore  testimony  to  her  high  worth.  In  the  funeral 
oration  it  was  said:  "Mrs.  Odell  knew  the  dignity  of  human  life,  prized  her  inheritance 
as  a  Christian  and  looked  at  life  and  its  problems  in  a  philosophical  way.  She  grew  to 
God  like  a  flower,  or  a  tree.  She  did  not  suppress  and  stamp  out  the  upliftings  of  her 
spirit.  *  *  *  Her  faith  expressed  itself  in  terms  of  service.  Her  motto  might  well  have 
been  that  of  the  Master  himself,  'I  am  among  you  as  one  that  serves.'  She  loved  to 
serve  and  the  joy  of  her  life  was  in  doing  something  helpful  for  others." 

General  Odell  has  for  seventy-five  years  been  a  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal 
church  and  was  a  lay  delegate  to  the  general  conference  in  May,  1900,  and  also  to  the 
general  conference  in  Los  Angeles  in  1904,  serving  on  the  latter  occasion  as  alternate 
and  filling  out  half  of  the  term.  Fraternally  he  has  been  connected  with  the  Ancient 
Order  of  United  Workmen  since  1888.  His  political  allegiance  was  first  given  to  the 
whig  party  and  since  its  dissolution  he  has  been  a  stalwart  champion  of  republican 
principles.  His  life  has  been  one  of  great  activity  and  usefulness  and  he  has  reached 
the  evening  of  his  days — being  now  a  nonagenarian — crowned  with  the  honor  and  re- 
spect which  are  the  legitimate  outgrowth  of  an  upright  life. 


SIDNEY  EUGENE  WOOSTER. 

One  of  the  most  prominent  real  estate  and  business  men  of,  Clackamas  county  is 
Sidney  E.  Wooster,  who  resides  at  Estacada.  He  is  a  Missourian,  his  birth  having  taken 
place  in  that  state  in  1865.  His  father,  Jonathan  Wooster,  was  a  native  of  Maine,  whose 
forebears  had  settled  in  New  England  long  before  the  Revolutionary  war.  For  fifty 
years  Captain  Jonathan  Wooster  followed  the  sea,  but  in  1861,  deciding  to  spend  the 
remainder'  of  his  life  on  land,  he  settled  in  Missouri  and  there  remained  until  1877, 
when  he  removed  to  Oregon  and  became  a  settler  of  Clackamas  county.  He  purchased 
a  farm  and  the  town  of  Estacada  is  built  upon  a  corner  of  the  first  farm  on  which  he 
lived.  The  maternal  grandfather  of  the  subject  of  this  review  was  a  gallant  soldier  and 
fought  under  Jackson  in  the  War  of  1812. 

S.  E.  Wooster  received  such  education  as  the  new  country  afforded  and  worked 
on  his  father's  farm  until  he  was  eighteen  years  of  age.  Seeking  further  opportunities 
Mr.  Wooster  removed  from  his  father's  farm  to  Idaho,  where  he  engaged  in  mercan- 
tile pursuits  for  some  years.  He  also  learned  the  carpenter  trade  and  followed  that  line 
for  a  period.  In  1891  Mr.  Wooster  was  married  and  in  1907,  they  removed  to  Estacada 
and  since  that  time  have  taken  a  leading  place  in  the  upbuilding  of  that  section  of 
Oregon.  Mr.  Wooster  operates  a  farm  of  eighty-seven  acres  in  the  Garfield  district, 
sixty  acres  of  which  are  devoted  to  grain.  As  a  real  estate  dealer  he  has  the  largest 
trade  of  any  man  in  like  business  in  the  county  as  is  evidenced  by  the  sale  of  more 
than  thirty-six  thousand  dollars  worth  of  land  in.  the  month  of  August.  Besides  his 
real  estate  and  farming  interests  Mr.  Wooster  is  a  public  spirited  man  and  he  has 
held  the  office  of  councilman  and  is  at  present  the  city  recorder  of  Estacada. 

Much  of  Mr.  Wooster's  present-day  success  may  be  attributed  to  the  encourage- 
ment and  cooperation  of  his  wife,  to  whom  he  was  married  in  1891.  She  was,  pre- 
vious to  her  marriage.  Miss  Emma  Harris,  daughter  of  B.  E.  Harris,  who  crossed  the 
plains  in  1863  by  ox  team  from  his  home  in  Missouri.  Her  father  to  the  time  of  his 
death  was  the  oldest  living  Mason  in  Oregon  and  her  brother,  R.  L.  Harris,  who  is 
mayor  of  Dayton,  is  the  highest  Odd  Fellow  in  the  state.  The  Harris  family  are  of 
old  Pennsylvania  stock  and  the  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Wooster  owned  and  laid  out  the 
town  of  Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania.  Two  children  were  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wooster: 
Harold  E.,  who  is  engaged  in  farming;  and  Helen,  a  young  lady  of  many  accomplish- 
ments, who  has  just  graduated  from  high  school  and  is  preparing  for  a  university 
course. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Wooster  is  a  Mason  and  Mrs.  Wooster  is  a  member  of  the  Metho- 
dist church  and  one  of  its  board  of  trustees.  She  is  of  much  assistance  to  her  hus- 
band in  the  real  estate  business.  Mr.  Wooster  is  the  fiduciary  agent  of  the  loan  depart- 
ment of  the  Union  Central  Lite  Insurance  Company  and  has  invested  large  sums  for 
that  corporation.  During  the  World  war  both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wooster  were  among 
the  most  active  citizens  in  the  community  in  all  kinds  of  war  work.     In  the  Liberty 


1200  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

and  Victory  bond  campaigns  Mr.  Wooster  was  a  power,  while  Mrs.  Wooster's  activity 
in  War  Stamps  and  Red  Cross  work  placed  her  in  the  ranks  as  one  hundred  per  cent 
American.  To  be  good,  useful  and  progressive  citizens  has  always  been  the  aim  of 
the  Wooster  family  and  in  the  realization  of  their  aim  they  rest  secure  in  the  high 
regard   and   esteem   of   their   fellow    citizens. 


TILLMAN   D.    TAYLOR. 


The  death  of  Tillman  D.  Taylor,  ex-sheriff  of  Umatilla  county,  occurred  as  the 
result  of  bullet  wounds  received  on  July  25,  1920,  when  he  was  shot  by  Emmett  Ban- 
croft, a  bandit.  He  was  a  prominent  and  progressive  citizen  of  Umatilla  county  and 
his  death   came  as  a  severe  blow  to  his  many   friends   throughout   the  community. 

Tillman  D.  Taylor  was  born  near  Silverton,  Marion  county,  Oregon,  on  the 
19th  of  September,  1S66,  a  son  of  David  and  Sarah  Ann  (Gerking)  Taylor,  further 
mention  of  whom  is  made  on  another  page  of  this  work.  Sheriff  Taylor's  boyhood 
was  spent  on  the  old  homestead,  three  miles  west  of  Athena  and  he  received  his  edu- 
cation in  the  schools  of  the  county  and  later  attended  the  A.  P.  Armstrong  Business 
College  of  Portland.  After  completing  his  course  in  this  college  he  returned  to  Athena 
and  accepted  a  clerkship  in  the  Holier  &  Cleve  dr>'  goods  store  there.  He  then 
engaged  with  C.  A.  Barrett  in  the  hardware  business,  in  which  connection  he 
remained  for  a  number  of  years,  later  selling  his  interest  to  Mr.  Barrett  and  accept- 
ing a  position  with  the  Handford  Hardware  Company.  In  189S  he  was  appointed  to 
the  position  of  deputy  sheriff  under  William  Blakley,  and  for  four  years  he  served 
in  this  capacity,  then  being  elected  sheriff,  which  latter  office  he  was  holding  at  the 
time  he  was  shot.  During  the  years  in  which  he  was  sheriff  he  made  it  a  point 
never  to  shoot  a  man.  Bancroft,  the  bandit  whose  bullet  snuffed  out  the  life  of  Sheriff 
Taylor,  had  been  saved  by  the  sheriff  only  a  few  days  before,  while  being  capturea. 
At  that  time  Bancroft  fired  at  Sheriff  Taylor  and  tried  to  kill  him.  A  jail  break  was 
planned  for  Sunday  morning,  July  25,  1920.  when  Bancroft,  with  four  others,  attempted 
to  escape.  Sheriff  Taylor  was  sitting  in  his  office  at  the  courthouse  in  Pendleton  when 
the  bullet  came  crashing  through  the  window.  Bancroft  was  executed  in  punishment 
for  his  crime,  two  others  have  been  sentenced  to  be  hung,  while  the  other  two  are 
serving  life  sentences.  In  the  activities  of  Umatilla  county  Sheriff  Taylor  has  always 
taken  an  active  part  and  he  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Pendleton  Round-up,  and 
its  president  for  eleven  years.  He  was  a  fine  horseman  and  sportsman  and  was  always 
leader  of  the  parades. 

Mr.  Taylor  was  twice  married.  In  1889  he  wedded  Miss  Sadie  Smith  and  her 
death  occurred  at  Athena  five  years  later.  One  son,  Sheldon,  was  born  to  this  union. 
In  1898  he  was  married  to  Miss  Claire  Moussu,  a  daughter  of  H.  0.  Moussu.  Mrs. 
Taylor  is  living  and  makes  her  home  in  Pendleton,  where  she  has  many  friends. 

In  politics  Mr.  Taylor  was  a  stanch  supporter  of  the  democratic  party  and  was  a 
firm  believer  in  its  principles  as  factors  in  good  government.  He  was  a  thirty-second 
degree  Mason  and  a  member  of  the  Elks  and  the  Woodmen  of  the  World.  Sheriff  Tay- 
lor was  a  familiar  and  well  beloved  figure  in  the  community  and  a  void  has  been  left 
which  it  will  not  be  easy  to  fill.  He  was  honorable  and  upright  in  every  way  and  any 
town,  county,  or  state  would  have  been  proud  of  him  as  a  citizen. 


HUGH  MONTGOMERY. 


Hugh  Montgomery,  actively  engaged  in  the  practice  of  law  at  Portland,  with  a 
large  clientage  that  indicates  his  capability  in  handling  intricate  and  complex  legal 
problems,  was  born  in  Greenville,  Connecticut,  January  5,  1882.  a  son  of  Hugh  Montgom- 
ery. The  father,  who  was  a  native  of  Enniskillen,  Ireland,  emigrated  to  Canada  with 
his  parents  about  1850,  the  family  home  being  established  near  Montreal.  About  ten 
years  later  Hugh  Montgomery,  Sr..  crossed  the  border  into  the  United  States,  becoming 
a  resident  of  New  Hampshire.  Subsequently  he  removed  to  Connecticut,  where  he  re- 
mained for  five  years  and  then  went  to  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  and  subsequently 
to  Boston  and  to  Marblehead,  his  demise  occurring  in  the  latter  city  in  1898. 

In  the  schools  of  Lowell,  Massachusetts,  Hugh  Montgomery,  Jr..  pursued  his  oduca- 


TILLMAN   D.   TAYLOR 


I 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  203 

tion,  subsequently  spending  two  years  as  a  student  in  Wesleyan  University,  at  Middle- 
town,  Connecticut,  after  which  he  read  law  for  two  years  in  the  ofBce  o£  John  S.  Wil- 
liams, a  prominent  attorney  of  Guilford,  Maine.  He  then  made  his  way  to  Portland, 
where  an  older  brother  was  residing,  and  for  one  year  attended  the  Oregon  Law 
School  in  this  city.  In  1906  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar,  following  which  he  spent 
two  years  as  an  instructor  in  the  Hill  Military  College  of  Portland  and  in  1908  opened 
an  office  in  this  city.  In  1913  he  became  junior  member  of  the  law  firm  of  Piatt  & 
Piatt,  Montgomery  &  Fales,  which  connection  he  still  retains.  Possessing  highly  de- 
veloped intellectual  powers,  good  oratorical  ability  and  a  keen,  analytical  mind,  he 
has  been  notably  successful  as  a  trial  lawyer.  He  always  prepares  his  cases  with 
thoroughness  and  care  and  is  strong  in  argument,  sound  in  his  reasoning  and  logical 
in  his  deductions. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Montgomery  is  a  republican  and  an  earnest  member  of 
the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  Fraternally  he  is  identified  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias 
and  his  social  nature  finds  expression  in  his  membership  in  the  University  and  Port- 
land Golf  Clubs.  During  the  World  war  he  was  active  in  promoting  several  of  the 
local  bond  drives  and  his  record  is  a  most  commendable  one,  characterized  by  strict 
integrity  and  honor,  courage,  ability  and  hard  work.  He  is  extremely  fond  of  good 
literature  and  also  finds  much  enjoyment  in  fishing  and  in  playing  golf.  He  has  won 
success  by  industry,  ability  and  common  sense  and  these  qualities  unite  to  make  him 
an  upright  man  and  useful  citizen. 


JUDGE   THOMAS  J.   CLEETON. 

The  name  of  Judge  Thomas  J.  Cleeton  figures  prominently  upon  the  pages  of  the 
history  of  the  Portland  bar.  His  law  practice  has  long  been  of  an  extensive  and  im- 
portant character  and  he  has  filled  many  public  offices  in  the  direct  path  of  his  pro- 
fession, serving  for  a  number  of  years  as  judge  of  the  county  court.  He  was  born  on  a 
farm  in  Schuyler  county,  Missouri,  October  7,  1861,  and  is  descended  in  the  paternal 
line  from  Scotch  ancestors,  although  the  family'  has  been  represented  in  this  country 
through  several  generations.  His  grandfather,  Enoch  Cleeton,  was  born  in  Kentucky 
and  was  the  father  of  three  sons  who  rendered  active  service  in  the  Civil  war.  This 
num'ber  included  Thornton  Yancy  Cleeton,  the  father  of  Judge  Cleeton,  who  was  born 
in  Howard  county,  Missouri,  in  1832  and  during  the  progress  of  hostilities  between 
the  north  and  the  south  was  a  member  of  the  Missouri  State  Militia  and  did  active 
work  in  military  connections  in  the  southwest.  He  was  married  in  his  native  state 
to  Miss  Lucy  Reeves  and  passed  away  at  Lancaster,  Missouri,  in  1918,  having  for 
many  years  survived  his  wife,  who  died  in  1862. 

Thomas  J.  Cleeton  was  reared  on  a  farm,  dividing  his  time  between  the  duties 
of  the  schoolroom,  the  pleasures  of  the  playground  and  the  work  of  the  fields  through 
the  period  of  his  boyhood  and  early  youth.  After  mastering  the  branches  of  learning 
taught  in  the  country  schools  he  pursued  a  course  in  the  State  Normal  School  at 
Kirksville,  Missouri,  and  also  attended  a  business  college  at  that  place.  When  nine- 
teen years  of  age  he  took  up  the  profession  of  teaching  and  proved  a  capable  edu- 
cator, imparting  readily  and  clearly  to  others  the  knowledge  he  had  acquired.  When 
but  twenty-one  years  of  age  he  was  appointed  superintendent  of  schools  in  Schuyler 
county,  Missouri,  and  also  taught  in  the  high  school  at  Lancaster,  that  state.  He 
served  for  two  years  in  office  and  in  the  meantime  began  reading  law  in  Lancaster 
in  preparation  for  the  practice  of  the  profession.  In  1886  he  removed  to  Winfleld, 
Kansas,  and  soon  afterward  took  up  his  abode  at  Dexter,  Kansas,  where  he  filled  the 
position  of  principal  of  the  high  school.  He  next  went  to  Kansas  City,  Missouri, 
where  he  continued  his  law  reading  for  a  year,  and  in  1891  arrived  in  Portland, 
Oregon. 

Not  long  afterward  Mr.  Cleeton  went  to  Columbia  county,  Oregon,  where  he 
was  engaged  in  teaching  for  two  years  and  then  in  1893  was  elected  to  the  superin- 
tendency  of  schools  in  that  county.  He  filled  the  position  for  two  years  and  in  1895 
was  elected  to  the  state  legislature,  so  that  he  became  identified  with  the  lawmaking 
body  of  the  commonwealth,  while  at  the  same  time  he  engaged  in  the  practice  of  law, 
thus  aiding  in  the  interpretation  of  legal  problems  in  the  courts.  In  1894  he  had  been 
admitted  to  the  bar.  He  served  for  a  term  in  the  legislature  and  in  1896  wis  elected 
prosecuting    attorney    of    the    fifth    judicial    district    of    Oregon,    then    comprising   four 


204  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

counties.  His  term's  service  was  characterized  by  capability  and  efficiency  that  led 
to  his  reelection  in  1898.  In  1900  he  came  to  Portland,  where  he  t'or.iied  a  partner- 
ship with  R.  P.  Graham  as  junior  member  of  the  firm  of  Graham  &  Cleeton.  They 
were  joined  by  W.  M.  Davis  in  1908,  thus  organizing  the  firm  of  Graham,  Cleeton  & 
Davis,  and  Judge  Cleeton  thus  continued  in  practice  until  i910,  when  he  was  appointed 
county  judge  of  Multnomah  county  to  fill  a  vacancy.  In  the  fall  of  that  year  he  was 
elected  to  the  office  and  so  served  until  1912,  when  he  was  appointed  by  the  legislature 
to  the  position  of  circuit  judge  of  Multno.-nah  county,  the  office  of  county  judge  hav- 
ing been  abolished.  In  1914  the  supreme  court  of  Oregon  declared  unconstitutional  the 
act  of  the  legislature  in  abolishing  the  office  of  county  judge  and  Mr.  Cleeton  then 
returned  to  the  county  bench  and  was  also  made  judge  of  the  juvenile  court.  Thus  he 
continued  to  serve  in  his  judicial  capacity  until  January  1,  1917,  when  he  resumed 
the  private  practice  of  law,  forming  a  partnership  with  James  H.  McMenamin  under 
the  firm  style  of  Cleeton  &  McMenamin.  His  clientage  is  now  extensive  and  c£  an 
important  character.  His  reasoning  is  always  clear,  his  deductions  sound,  his  argu- 
ments logical  and  his  oratory  convincing.  He  never  seeks  to  enshroud  his  cause 
in  any  sentimental  garb  or  illusion  but  presents  with  clearness  and  force  the  points 
which  he  wishes  to  prove  and  seldom,  if  ever,  fails  to  impress  court  or  jury  with  the 
wisdom  and   correctness  of  his  position. 

On  the  24th  of  December,  1893,  at  Vernonia,  Oregon,  Judge  Cleeton  was  married 
to  Miss  Maud  Esta  Shanahan,  a  daughter  of  Alfred  A.  Shanahan,  a  native  of  Indiana, 
who  served  for  four  years  in  the  Ninth   Indiana  Volunteer  Infantry'  in  the  Civil  war. 

Judge  Cleeton  has  always  voted  with  the  republican  party  and  is  a  strong  believer 
in  its  principles.  He  is  a  Master  Mason,  also  a  Knight  of  Pythias  and  a  member  of 
the  Elks,  the  Moose  and  the  Woodmen  of  the  World.  He  likewise  has  membership 
connections  with  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  of  Portland,  with  the  Progressive  Busi- 
ness Men's  Club,  the  Civic  League  and  the  Press  Club.  These  associations  are  indic- 
ative of  the  nature,  spirit  and  breadth  of  his  interests.  He  stands  for  all  those  forces 
which  have  to  do  with  public  progress  and  upbuilding  and  his  cooperation  at  all  times 
can  be  counted  upon  to  aid  in  any  work  for  the  general  good.  He  attends  the 
Christian  church  and  his  life  is  ever  actuated  by  worthy  purposes  and  high  ideals. 


LESTER  GARFIELD  ICE,  D.  D.  S. 

Among  the  successful  and  well  known  dentists  of  Oregon  City,  is  Lester  Garfield 
Ice,  who  has  been  a  resident  of  Oregon  since  the  Lewis  and  Clarke  Expedition.  He 
is  a  native  of  West  Virginia  having  been  born  in  that  state  in  1882,  a  son  of  Dr. 
C.  H.  and  Rena  (Hildreth)  Ice.  Over  two  hundred  years  ago  the  Ice  family  received 
a  grant  of  land  in  the  state  of  Virginia  and  since  that  time  they  have  been  recorded 
as  one  of  the  first  families  of  Virginia,  a  thing  of  which  to  be  proud,  for  from  these 
first  families  many  of  our  presidents,  statesmen  and  historians  have  sprung,  as 
well  as  some  of  our  military  leaders.  His  father,  Dr.  C.  H.  Ice,  was  a  physician  who 
practiced  tor  many  years  in  West  Virginia,  and  was  held  in  high  esteem  in  his  com- 
munity, not  because  of  the  standing  of  the  family,  but  by  virtue  of  his  own  attain- 
ments. 

Lester  G.  Ice  was  reared  among  beautiful  southern  home  surroundings  and  re- 
ceived his  education  in  the  schools  of  his  native  state  and  at  the  Ohio  State  Univer- 
sity, from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1904.  Being  of  an  ambitious  nature  and  eager 
to  advance  he  was  quick  to  see  the  opportunities  which  were  being  opened  up  in  the 
northwest  and  during  the  Lewis  and  Clarke  Expedition  he  visited  Oregon,  and  becom- 
ing decidedly  impressed  with  the  country  he  elected  to  become  a  citizen.  He  selected 
Oregon  City  for  his  new  home,  opened  an  office  there,  and  has  remained.  He  is  now 
recognized  as  one  of  Oregon  City's  best  dentists  and  is  enjoying  a  large  and  lucrative 
practice. 

In  1909,  Dr.  Ice  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Bernice  Kelly,  a  daughter  of  Charles 
W.  Kelly,  who  is  a  native  son  of  Oregon  City.  The  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Ice,  E.  D.  Kelly, 
was  a  pioneer  of  Oregon,  having  come  to  this  state  in  1853.  He  was  a  highly  respected 
citizen  and  was  honored  with  many  offices  by  his  fellow  citizens.  Two  children  have 
been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ice:  William  H.  and  Jane,  both  of  whom  are  pupils  of  the 
grade  schools  of  Oregon   City. 

As  an  interested  and  active  member  of  his  profession  Dr.  Ice  is  a  member  of  the 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  205 

Oregon  Dental  Society  and  the  American  Dental  Association,  and  fraternally  he  is  a 
Royal  Arch  Mason,  an  Elk  and  a  Modern  Woodman.  To  each  organization,  whether 
professional  or  fraternal,  he  gives  his  stanch  support,  and  this  same  support  and 
eagerness  to  serve  is  reflected  in  his  daily  life,  whether  it  be  as  a  private  citizen  or  as 
a  professional  man,  with  the  result  that  his  friends  are   legion. 


GEORGE  FRANKLIN  HOPKINS,  Jk. 

George  Franklin  Hopkins,  Jr.,  who  since  1918  has  heen  manager  of  the  claim  de- 
partment of  the  Portland  branch  of  R.  G.  Dun  &  Company,  is  a  rising  young  attorney  of 
this  city,  specializing  in  the  field  of  business  adjustment.  He  has  also  shown  unusual 
ability  in  preparing  law  briefs,  and  actuated  at  all  times  by  the  spirit  of  firm  deter- 
mination, he  carries  forward  to  successful  completion  whatever  he  undertakes.  Mr. 
Hopkins  was  borri  in  Greenville,  British  Columbia,  June  3,  1889,  a  son  of  George  F. 
Hopkins.  The  father's  birth  occurred  in  Chicago,  Illinois,  in  1853  and  he  engages  in 
preaching  the  gospel  as  a  minister  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  In  British 
Columbia  he  wedded   Mary  Ann  Green  and  they  now  reside   in   Raymond,  'Washington. 

In  the  public  schools  George  F.  Hopkins,  Jr.,  pursued  his  education  and  subse- 
quently he  became  a  student  in  the  Willamette  University  at  Salem,  Oregon,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  in  1912  with  the  LL.  B.  degree.  In  that  year  he  was  admitted 
to  the  bar,  and  opening  an  office  in  Portland,  he  continued  in  private  practice  for  a 
period  of  four  years,  or  until  1916,  when  he  became  manager  of  the  claim  department  of 
R.  G.  Dun  &  Company  in  this  city,  which  position  he  retains. 

On  the  4th  of  March,  1915,  in  this  city,  Mr.  Hopkins  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Minnie  Fay  Lindley,  a  daughter  of  William  F.  Lindley,  now  living  retired.  In  his 
political  views  Mr.  Hopkins  is  a  republican  and  his  religious  faith  is  indicated  by  his 
membership  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  He  is  a  Master  Mason,  exemplifying 
in  his  daily  life  the  beneficent  teachings  of  that  organization.  He  is  also  identified 
with  the  Rotary  Club  and  devotes  considerable  time  to  promoting  the  welfare  of 
civic  organizations.  On  the  1st  of  August,  1918,  he  enlisted  for  service  in  the  World 
war,  becoming  a  member  of  the  First  Company  of  the  Coast  Artillery  Corps.  He  was 
sent  to  Fort  Stevens,  Oregon,  where  he  remained  until  honorably  discharged  on  the 
17th  of  December,  1918.  He  also  was  active  in  promoting  several  local  bond  drives, 
including  the  Victory  loan,  doing  all  in  his  power  to  aid  the  government  in  its  hour 
of  need. 


CHARLES  HARVEY  STOCKWELL. 

In  every  community  there  is  one  man  always  who  stands  out  above  his  fellows  in 
the  business  life  of  the  town,  and  as  a  civic  leader.  In  Clatskanie  that  man  is  C.  H. 
Stockwell,  president  of  the  State  Bank.  Mr.  Stockwell  is  a  native  of  Quincy,  Illinois, 
where  he  was  born  in  1875.  He  comes  from  pre-Revolutionary  stock  on  both  sides.  His 
father  was  born  in  Lowell,  Massachusetts,  where  his  ancestors  had  settled  before  the 
days  of  George  Washington.  He  was  engaged  in  the  railroad  business  for  fifty  years, 
his  first  railroad  experience  being  on  the  old  Boston  and  Maine  Railroad.  After  com- 
ing west  he  built  the  Union  Pacific  Railroad  through  the  state  of  Wyoming  under  the 
protection  of  the  United  States  troops.  He  also  built  the  Milwaukee  &  St.  Paul  Rail- 
road through  Iowa  and  South  Dakota  and  was  one  of  the  pioneer  railroad  builders  in 
the  days  of  the  expansion  of  railways  in   America. 

Charles  H.  Stockwell  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Coon  Rapids,  Iowa,  and  first 
entered  the  railroad  service  as  a  telegrapher  for  the  Milwaukee  &  St.  Paul  Railroad 
and  he  soon  rose  to  the  position  of  train  dispatcher  of  that  division.,  Then  deciding 
that  the  railroad  business  was  not  his  life  work,  he  resigned  and  took  up  banking. 
He  became  cashier  of  the  Coon  Rapids  National  Bank,  and  while  serving  in  that 
capacity  was  elected  vice  president  of  the  Elkhart  State  Bank.  He  served  in  both 
capacities  until  1904,  when  he  visited  Oregon,  and  was  so  impressed  with  the  climatic 
and  business  conditions  in  the  Columbia  river  country  that  he  sold  all  of  his  property 
in  the  east  and  located  at  St.  Helens,  where  he  established  the  first  bank  in  Columbia 
county,    the    Columbia    County    Bank,    of    which    institution    he    became    cashier.      His 


206  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

father,  whom  he  induced  to  come  west  in  1906,  became  the  president  of  the  Clatskanie 
State  Bank.  The  same  year  Charles  H.  Stockwell  sold  out  his  interests  in  the  bank 
at  St.  Helens  and  moved  to  Clatskanie.  where  he  established  the  Clatskanie  State 
Bank  and  became  its  cashier,  his  father  holding  the  ofBce  of  president  until  his  demise 
in  1917.  In  that  year  Charles  Stockwell  became  the  president,  in  which  oflftce  he  has 
continued.  It  is  not  only  as  president  of  the  bank  that  he  has  been  of.  value  to  the 
town,  but  he  is  foremost  in  every  enterprise  that  means  the  upbuilding  of  Clatskanie, 
as  will  be  seen  by  the  mere  mention  of  the  enterprises  in  which  he  has  invested  his 
time,  talent  and  money.  He  is  largely  interested  in  the  Clatskanie  Mercantile  Com- 
pany, the  Summit  Lumber  Company,  the  Henry  Kratz  Shingle  Company,  of  which 
he  is  secretary  and  treasurer,  and  he  is  a  partner  in  the  Clatskanie  Land  Company, 
which  owns  some  five  hundred  acres  of  fine  dairy  farm  land  and  in  another  company 
which  owns  nineteen  hundred  acres  of  tide  lands.  Fraternally  Mr.  Stockwell  is  a 
Mason. 

Mr.  Stockwell  was  married  in  1904  to  Alice  Lillian  Johnson  of  Coon  Rapids, 
the  daughter  of  V.  M.  Johnson,  one  of  the  leading  builders  and  contractors  of  the 
middle  west.  They  are  the  parents  of  two  children:  Bethima,  and  Genevieve  Alice, 
who  are  students  in  the  Clatskanie  schools.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stockwell  are  members  of 
the  Presbyterian  church,  where  Mrs.  Stockwell  is  the  organist.  In  war  work,  in 
every  activity,  both  social  and  In  the  business  world,  the  Stockwell  family  has  always 
been  in  the  foreground. 


ELBERT   BELVIN  CASTEEL. 

Elbert  Belvin  Casteel  of  the  firm  of  Casteel  &  Stanley,  general  merchants  of  Pilot 
Rock,  Umatilla  county,  was  born  in  Laurel  county,  Kentucky,  on  the  28th  of  April, 
1887,  a  son  of  Robert  and  Polly    (Riggs)    Casteel. 

Elbert  B.  Casteel  remained  in  his  native  state  until  1899,  when  he  removed  with 
his  parents  to  Mercer  county,  Missouri.  There  he  received  his  education  and  resided 
on  his  father's  ranch  until  in  the  spring  of  1906  he  moved  to  Pilot  Rock  and  entered 
into  the  employment  of  his  brother,  H.  G.,  who  was  successfully  conducting  a  con- 
fectionery store  there  but  he  is  now  a  resident  of  Umatilla  county  near  Pilot  Rock. 
For  one  year  Elbert  B.  worked  for  his  brother  and  in  1907  became  a  clerk  in  the  Carnes 
Brothers  Mercantile  Company  where  he  remained  for  four  years,  buying  a  fourth 
interest  in  this  concern  in  1909.  In  1915  he  sold  his  interest  to  W.  N.  Royer  and 
with  W.  C.  Stanley  started  the  mercantile  business  which  they  are  now  so  ably 
conducting.  The  business  has  grown  to  extensive  proportions  and  Mr.  Casteel  is 
widely  recognized  as  a  man  of  keen  business  discrimination  and  unusual  ability. 
He  has  made  many  close  friends,  both  business  and  personal,  who  greatly  value  their 
acquaintance  with  him.  His  popularity  throughout  the  community  was  manifest  when 
he  was  elected  to  the  office  of  mayor,  which  position  he  filled  for  two  terms. 

In  1913  Mr.  Casteel  was  married  to  Miss  Anna  Boylen,  daughter  of  Herbert  and 
Maggie  (Bird)  Boylen,  and  a  native  of  Umatilla  county.  Her  father  was  for  many 
years  a  prominent  sheepman  of  Umatilla  county  and  he  is  now  living  retired  in  Pilot 
Rock.     Two  children  have  been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Casteel:   Blaine  and  Maxine. 

The  political  faith  of  Mr.  Casteel  is  that  of  the  republican  party,  in  the  interests 
of  which  he  takes  an  active  part.  Fraternally  he  holds  membership  in  the  Masons,  in 
which  order  he  has  attained  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Scottish  Rite,  the  Odd 
Fellows  and  the  Elks.  The  religious  faith  of  the  family  is  that  of  the  Presbyterian 
church.  Among  all  his  friends  and  acquaintances  Mr.  Casteel  is  known  to  be  a  man 
of  business  integrity  and  in  all   transactions  and   intercourse  he   is   reliable   and  just. 


DR.  SAMUEL  TOWERS  LINKLATER. 

Dr.  Samuel  Towers  Linklater  was  born  in  the  Orkney  Islands  off  the  coast  of 
Scotland  in  1853.  His  parents  were  William  and  Margaret  (Stockand)  Linklater.  For 
generations'  the  family  had  been  one  of  note  on  the  Orkney  Islands.  Asa  Linklater, 
the  great-great-grandfather  of  Dr.  Linklater.  was  a  commanding  figure  in  social,  church 
and  civic  life,   as  was  his  son  Hugh   and  his  grandson  Peter. 


I 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  207 

Samuel  Towers  Linklater  receiving  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Stromness, 
became  a  clerk  and  then  a  school  teacher,  and  it  was  not  until  his  twenty-fifth  year 
that  he  took  up  the  study  of  medicine.  He  graduated  from  the  University  of  Edin- 
burgh in  1882  with  the  degree  of  M.  B.  C.  M.  He  practiced  first  in  the  city  of  Leith, 
but  in  1883  he  determined  to  make  his  residence  in  Australia.  While  traveling  across 
the  United  States  he  visited  Oregon  and  was  so  impressed  with  the  scenic  beauty  and 
the  climatic  advantages  of  Washington  county  that  he  decided  to  give  up  his  trip 
to  Australia  and  settle  in  Hillsboro.  Although  he  had  graduated  from  the  University 
of  Edinburgh  with  highest  honors,  Dr.  Linklater  never  considered  his  education  finished 
and  he  was  always  an  ardent  student  of  his  profession.  During  the  years  1891-2  he 
visited  Europe  and  took  graduate  courses  under  the  most  eminent  scientists  of  Edin- 
burgh, Berlin,  Vienna  and  other  European  centers  of  learning.  He  was  soon  recog- 
nized as  one  of  the  most  competent  physicians  in  Oregon,  and  was  frequently  urged 
to  establish  himself  in  Portland,  where  he  would  find  a  wider  field.  Dr.  Linklater 
refused  all  such  suggestions,  however,  on  the  ground  that  the  people  of  Washington 
county  were  as  much  entitled   to  expert  medical  knowledge  as  those   of  a  large   city. 

Dr.  Linklater  was  a  man  of  strong  public  spirit  and  deep  benevolence.  His  repu- 
tation did  not  rest  solely  upon  his  medical  proficiency,  but  also  upon  his  general  kindli- 
ness and  his  progressive  enthusiasm.  In  1886  he  established  the  Delta  Drug  Com- 
pany in  Hillsboro,  which  is  still  the  leading  pharmacy  of  the  city  and  with  the  same 
civic  pride  he  edited  and  published  the  Hillsboro  Independent.  Neither  of  these 
enterprises  was  entered  upon  for  the  lucrative  gain  accruing  to  them  but  rather  to 
lend  a  helping  hand  to  the  growth  of  his  adopted  home. 

At  the  height  of  his  usefulness  he  was  called  one  night  to  attend  a  patient  in  an 
adjoining  town.  Returning  he  attempted  to  board  the  midnight  train  to  Hillsboro. 
The  next  morning  his  unconscious  body  was  found  beside  the  track  and  his  death 
resulted  within  a  few  days.  All  Oregon  mourned  him  as  one  of  its  most  able  and 
distinguished  physicians  and  its  best  loved  and  most  unselfish  citizens. 

Dr.  Linklater  was  married  in  1886  to  Eliza  M.  Sinclair,  who  died  in  1889.  In 
1898  he  married  Zula  Harriett  Warren,  a  native  of  Oregon  and  a  daughter  of  a 
highly  esteemed  family  of  Washington  county.  They  became  the  parents  of  six  chil- 
dren: Francis  W.  Linklater,  who  served  in  the  navy  during  eighteen  months  of 
the  World  war  and  was  overseas  after  the  armistice  and  made  five  trips  on  a  transport. 
He  took  his  freshman  year  at  Reed  College  of  Portland  and  his  sophomore  year  at 
Pacific  University;  Margaret  Ruth,  a  student  of  the  University  of  Washington;  Doro- 
thy, a  student  of  Pacific  University;  Samuel  Edward,  who  will  enter  college  this 
autumn;  Kenneth  Ashwell,  a  student  in  the  Hillsboro  high  school  at  the  present  time; 
and  Ethel,  a  grade  pupil.  Mrs.  Linklater  is  a  musician  of  merit,  and  is  the  organist 
of  the  local  Congregational  church.  She  is  active  in  church  circles,  but  her  chief 
claim  to  distinction  is  as  a  devoted  mother.  Since  Dr.  Linklater's  decease  she  has 
lived  for  her  children,  who,  a  happy  combination  of  their  mother's  aesthetic  and  musi- 
cal temperament  and  the  sturdy  Scotch  integrity  of  their  father,  have  amply  repaid 
her  devotion. 

Dr.  Linklater  was  a  Mason,  of  the  thirty-second  degree,  a  Shriner  and  a  Knight 
of  Pythias,  and  was  the  regimental  surgeon  of  the  latter  organization.  He  was  an 
honored  member  of  the  Oregon  Medical  Society  and  of  the  American  Medical  Associa- 
tion. Professionally  and  as  a  man,  Dr.  Linklater  had  no  superior  and  the  Linklater 
name  will  be  recorded  on  the  pages  of  Oregon's  history  for  many  generations. 


EDWARD  THOMAS  TAGGART. 

The  life  record  of  Edward  Thomas  Taggart,  an  able  representative  of  the  Port- 
land bar,  indicates  what  can  be  accomplished  through  indefatigable  effort  and  deter- 
mined purpose,  when  guided  by  intelligence,  sound  judgment  and  laudable  ambition. 
He  is  a  man  of  determined  purpose,  carrying  forward  to  successful  completion  whatever 
he  undertakes,  for  he  possesses  the  resolute  spirit  which  enables  him  to  overcome  all 
obstacles  and  difficulties  in  his  path. 

Mr.  Taggart  is  numbered  among  the  citizens  that  the  Emerald  isle  has  furnished 
to  Oregon.  His  birth  occurred  in  County  Antrim  on  the  26th  of  August,  1868,  and 
his  parents  were  John  and  Elizabeth  (Higginson)  Taggart,  the  former  of  Scotch 
and  the  latter  of  English  lineage.     Reared  on  a  farm   in  his   native  land  the 


208  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

son  there  attended  the  national  schools  and  with  no  special  training  for  a  particular 
line  of  business  was  obliged  to  accept  any  position  open  to  a  person  without  special 
qualifications,  during  the  early  period  of  his  manhood.  Thinking  to  find  better  oppor- 
tunities for  advancement  in  the  new  world  he  emigrated  to  the  United  States  by  way 
of  Canada,  making  his  way  to  San  Francisco,  California.  Leaving  the  Golden  state 
he  came  to  Oregon  on  the  25th  of  July,  1890,  and  since  September  of  that  year  has 
been  a  resident  of  Portland.  During  the  early  period  of  his  connection  with  this  city 
he  was  employed  by  the  Portland  Cable  Railroad  Company  for  about  two  years  and 
then  resigned  to  accept  a  position  with  the  dry  goods  firm  of  Lipman  &  Wolfe,  with 
whom  he  remained  for  about  four  years,  devoting  his  leisure  hours  to  the  study  of  law. 
In  September,  1896,  he  resigned  in  order  that  he  might  devote  his  entire  attention 
to  his  chosen  profession  and  became  a  student  at  the  University  of  Michigan  at  Ann 
Arbor,  where  he  pursued  special  studies  in  English  in  addition  to  the  regular  law- 
course.  He  was  graduated  therefrom  in  June.  1898,  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of 
Laws,  and  returning  to  Portland  at  once  entered  upon  active  practice.  The  zeal  with 
which  he  has  devoted  his  energies  to  his  profession,  the  careful  regard  evinced  for  the 
interests  of  his  clients  and  his  assiduous  and  unrelaxing  attention  to  all  the  details 
of  his  cases,  have  brought  him  a  large  business  and  made  him  very  successful  in  its 
conduct.  His  arguments  have  elicited  warm  commendation  not  only  from  his  asso- 
ciates at  the  bar  but  also  from  the  bench.  His  presentation  of  a  case  indicates  wide 
research,  careful  thought  and  the  best  and  strongest  reasons  that  can  be  urged  for  his 
contention,  presented  in  a  cogent  and  logical  form  and  illustrated  by  a  style  unusually 
lucid  and  clear. 

On  the  28th  of  August,  1899,  in  Tacoma.  Washington,  llr.  Taggart  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Eugenia  Hobbs,  a  daughter  of  an  old  New  York  family  and  a  graduate 
of  the  University  of  Michigan.  In  his  political  views  Mr.  Taggart  is  an  earnest  republi- 
can and  since  1887  has  been  an  exemplary  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity.  He 
entered  into  afliliation  with  Occidental  Lodge,  No.  22.  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  San  Francisco, 
about  1889.  and  later  became  a  member  of  Harmony  Lodge,  No.  12,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of 
Portland.  Since  1892  he  has  been  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows 
and  has  held  all  the  oflSces  in  the  subordinate  lodge,  and  he  is  also  identified  with  the 
Irvington  Club.  Having  been  born  and  reared  in  the  Presbyterian  faith  his  views 
naturally  followed  the  teachings  of  that  church,  of  which  he  has  long  been  a  useful 
member.  His  life  has  ever  been  guided  by  high  and  honorable  principles  and  his 
acts  are  prompted  by  worthy  motives.  His  fellow  townsmen  attest  his  sterling  quali- 
ties and  personal  worth  as  well  as  his  professional  ability  and  he  has  gained  a  wide 
circle  of   friends   during  the   period   of   his   residence    in   the   northwest. 


WILLIAM   ARTHUR  ROBBINS. 

William  Arthur  Robbins,  a  distinguished  member  of  the  Oregon  bar  practicing  at 
Portland,  has  elosely  applied  himself  to  the  mastery  of  legal  principles  and  his  high 
professional  standing  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  is  retained  as  attorney  by  the 
Oregon-Washington  Railroad  &  Navigation  Company.  A  native  of  this  state,  Mr. 
Robbins  was  born  on  a  farm  in  Polk  county,  July  27,  1873.  His  father,  John  H.  Rob- 
bins,  was  born  in  Decatur  county,  Indiana,  September  2,  1832,  and  in  1862,  when  thirty 
years  of  age,  crossed  the  plains  to  Oregon,  first  locating  at  Dallas  and  subsequently 
removing  to  Polk  county,  where  he  followed  farming.  In  1877  he  came  to  Portland, 
where  he  entered  business  circles  as  proprietor  of  a  music  store  which  he  conducted 
for  several  years,  continuing  a  resident  of  this  city  until  1888.  He  then  became  inter- 
ested in  mining  and  from  1888  until  1895  successfully  operated  the  Robbins-Elkhom 
gold  mines.  He  was  also  the  possessor  of  notable  creative  ability  and  became  the 
inventor  of  the  combined  harvester,  which  is  now  extensively  used  throughout  the 
northwest.  He  was  twice  married,  his  first  wife  being  Hester  Minnock,  whom  he 
wedded  in  Iowa  on  the  12th  of  January.  1855,  and  who  accompanied  her  husband  on 
his  removal  to  Oregon.  Their  family  numbered  three  children:  Benjamin  F.,  whose 
demise  occurred  in  the  Fox  valley  of  Oregon  on  the  12th  of  October,  1894;  Emma 
Alice,  the  widow  of  Isaac  C.  Reese,  whose  death  occurred  in  Portland:  and  Sarah 
Jane,  the  widow  of  George  Phillips,  who  passed  away  in  Zena,  Oregon.  The  death  of 
the  wife  and  mother  occurred  at  Baker,  Oregon,  soon  after  the  arrival  of  the  family 
in  that  city  in  1862  and  on  the  17th  of  January,  1864,  Mr.  Robbins  married   Margaret 


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WILLIAM    A.   ROBBINS 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  211 

Harvey,  the  ceremony  taking  place  at  Bethel,  Oregon.  She  is  a  native  of  this  state 
and  is  now  residing  in  Portland,  but  Mr.  Robbing  has  passed  away,  his  death  occurring 
near  Amity,   Oregon,   on   the   25th   of   September,   1912. 

In  the  schools  of  Portland  William  A.  Robbins  acquired  his  early  education 
and  subsequently  entered  the  law  school  of  Willamette  University  at  Salem,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  in  1898  with  the  LL.  B.  degree,  being  admitted  to  the  bar 
the  same  year.  Being  desirous  of  still  further  perfecting  his  professional  knowledge 
he  pursued  a  postgraduate  course  in  law  at  Leland  Stanford  University  of  California, 
and  establishing  an  office  in  Portland  he  has  since  made  steady  advancement  as  he 
has  proven  his  ability  to  cope  with  intricate  problems  of  the  law.  In  1904  he  became 
attorney  for  the  Oregon-Washington  Railroad  &  Navigation  Company  and  during  the 
period  of  the  World  war  was  made  general  attorney  for  the  United  States  Railroad 
Administration — a  tribute  to  his  high  professional  standing.  Following  his  release 
from  government  service  he  resumed  his  professional  connections  with  the  Oregon- 
Washington  Railroad  &  Navigation  Company  and  is  most  capably  safeguarding  the 
legal  interests  of  that  corporation.  His  mind  is  analytical  and  logical  in  its  trend 
and  in  his  presentation  of  a  case  he  is  always  fortified  by  a  comprehensive  under- 
standing of  the  legal  principles  applicable  thereto. 

On  the  6th  of  March,  1901,  in  Salem,  Oregon,  Mr.  Robbins  was  united  in  mar- 
riage to  Miss  Edyth  Grace  Savage,  a  daughter  of  the  late  Lyman  A.  Savage,  an  early 
settler  of  Marion  county,  Oregon,  where  for  many  years  he  successfully  followed 
farming,  there  passing  away  on  the  11th  of  February,  1S98. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Robbins  is  a  republican  and  his  fellow  townsmen,  recog- 
nizing his  worth  and  ability,  have  called  him  to  public  office.  From  1899  until  1902 
he  was  chief  clerk  of  the  Oregon  legislature  and  he  has  also  served  as  deputy  district 
attorney  for  the  seventh  judicial  district  of  Oregon.  He  affiliates  with  the  Chris- 
tian church  and  fraternally  is  identified  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows. 
He  is  also  a  Master  Mason  and  in  social  circles  of  his  community  is  well  known  as 
a  member  of  the  University  Club.  He  is  likewise  identified  with  the  Progressive 
Business  Men's  Club  and  the  Transportation  Club  and  is  an  earnest  and  active  mem- 
ber of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  giving  his  hearty  support  to  all  plans  and  projects 
that  have  as  their  object  the  advancement  of  his  city  and  the  extension  of  its  trade 
relations.  With  a  nature  that  cannot  be  content  with  mediocrity,  he  has  bent  every 
energy  to  the  mastery  of  his  profession  and  his  high  intellectual  attainments  have 
placed  him  with  the  foremost  attorneys  of  the  state.  His  course  has  been  character- 
ized by  integrity  and  honor  in  every  relation  and  commands  for  him  the  respect 
and  esteem  of  all  with  whom  he  has  been 


JOHN   FRANCIS   DALY. 


As  president  of  the  Hibernia  Commercial  &  Savings  Bank  of  Portland  John 
Francis  Daly  occupies  a  foremost  position  in  financial  circles  of  the  city,  and  actuated 
by  a  spirit  of  unfaltering  enterprise  and  determination  he  has  contributed  in  large 
measure  to  the  successful  management  of  the  undertaking,  which  is  one  of  the  large 
financial  enterprises  of  this  section  of  the  state.  He  has  won  success  through  honesty, 
integrity  and  strict  application  to  business  and  his  activities  have  ever  been  of  a 
constructive  nature,  contributing  to  public  progress  and  prosperity  as  well  as  to  in- 
dividual aggrandizement. 

Mr.  Daly  is  a  native  of  Iowa.  He  was  born  in  Cresco,  November  7,  1879,  a  son 
of  Mathew  W.  Daly  and  a  grandson  of  Maurice  Daly,  who  was  a  native  of  Ireland  and 
in  the  '30s  emigrated  to  the  United  States.  The  father  was  born  on  a  farm  in  New 
York  state  in  1850  and  in  Decorah,  Iowa,  he  married  Mary  Frances  Fitzgerald,  a  native 
of  Howard  county,  that  state.  In  1880  they  removed  to  Madison,  South  Dakota,  and 
there  the  demise  of  Mathew  W.  Daly  occurred  on  the  ISth  of  January,  1898. 

In  the  schools  of  Madison,  South  Dakota,  John  F.  Daly  pursued  his  early  educa- 
tion, after  which  he  attended  the  State  Normal  School.  He  next  became  a  student  in 
Notre  Dame  University,  but  after  reaching  his  sophomore  year  he  was  called  home 
by  the  death  of  his  father.  Being  the  eldest  son  he  assumed  charge  of  his  father's 
interests,  entering  the  bank  of  Daly  &  Mackay  at  Madison,  South  Dakota,  of  which 
Mathew  W.  Daly  was  the  president,  and  thus  acquiring  his  initial  experience  in  the 
field  of  banking.     There  he  received  thorough  instruction  in  matters  of  finance,  retain- 


212  HISTORY  OF  0REC40N 

ing  his  connection  with  the  bank  for  several  years.  In  September.  1904,  he  arrived 
in  Portland  and  for  seven  months  was  identified  with  the  Portland  Trust  Company  as 
manager  of  the  real  estate  and  investment  department.  In  1905  he  purchased  the 
business  of  the  Security  Abstract  &  Trust  Company,  of  which  he  became  president, 
so  continuing  until  1908,  in  which  year  he  organized  the  Title  &  Trust  Company, 
which  absorbed  the  business  of  the  Security  Abstract  &  Trust  Company,  increasing  its 
capital  from  fifty  thousand  to  two  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  dollars.  He  was 
active  in  the  management  of  this  large  enterprise  until  1919.  when  he  was  elected  to 
his  present  office  as  president  of  the  Hibernia  Commercial  &  Savings  Bank  of  Portland, 
which  is  regarded  as  one  of  the  substantial  moneyed  institutions  of  the  city.  Broad 
experience  has  given  him  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  banking  business  in  prin- 
ciple and  detail  and  he  is  able  to  speak  with  authority  upon  many  questions  relative 
to  financial  interests.  In  the  control  of  the  affairs  of  the  bank  he  displays  marked 
ability  and  energy,  regarding  no  detail  as  too  unimportant  to  receive  his  attention 
and  at  the  same  time  controlling  the  larger  factors  in  his  interests  with  notable  assur- 
ance and  power.  He  is  actuated  at  all  times  by  a  spirit  of  firm  determination  that 
enables  him  to  overcome  all  difficulties  and  obstacles  in  his  path  and  under  his  able 
direction  the  business  of  the  bank  has  shown  a  steady  increase.  He  retains  his  inter- 
est in  the  Title  &  Trust  Company,  of  which  he  is  a  director,  and  he  is  also  on  the 
directorate  of  the  Jlortgage  Guarantee  Company,  the  Bankers  Discount  Corporation 
and   the   Western   Wool   Warehouse   Company. 

On  the  2d  of  June,  1909,,  in  Portland,  Mr.  Daly  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Marguerite  Wiley,  a  daughter  of  the  late  Joseph  R.  and  Margaret  Wiley.  The  four 
children  of  this  marriage  are:  John  Daly,  Jr.,  Mary  Margaret,  James  Wiley  and  Cath- 
erine Clarissa. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Daly  is  a  republican  and  his  religious  faith  is  indicated 
by  his  identification  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus,  which  draws  its  members  from 
those  of  the  Catholic  faith.  He  possesses  a  delightful  personality,  which  has  won 
tor  him  many  friends,  and  he  is  a  popular  member  of  the  Arlington  and  Multnomah 
Amateur  Athletic  Clubs.  He  is  an  earnest  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and 
is  active  in  civic  matters,  supporting  all  plans  and  projects  which  have  for  their 
object  the  welfare  and  advancement  of  his  city.  During  the  period  of  the  World 
war  he  aided  in  promoting  all  of  the  Liberty  loan.  Red  Cross,  Y.  M.  C.  A.  and  Knights 
of  Columbus  drives,  serving  as  chairman  of  the  latter  campaign  in  Portland.  He  finds 
diversion  in  golf  and  is  fond  of  good  literature,  devoting  much  study  to  economic 
subjects,  and  in  all  matters  of  public  moment  he  is  deeply  and  helpfully  interested. 
His  connection  with  any  undertaking  insures  a  prosperous  outcome  of  the  same, 
for  it  is  his  nature  to  carry  forward  to  successful  completion  whatever  he  undertakes. 
He  has  never  sacrificed  high  standards  to  commercialism  and  his  record  is  proof  of 
the  fact  that  success  and  an  honored  name  may  be  won  simultaneously. 


BENNETT   BROTHERS. 

The  firm  of  Bennett  Brothers,  consisting  of  Ralph  B.  and  Leigh  S.  Bennett,  con- 
ducts a  garage  and  automobile  agency  on  the  Columbia  River  highway  in  the  city 
of  Hood  River  and  is  among  the  leaders  of  that  industry  in  the  Hood  River  valley. 
Their  parents  were  Daniel  S.  and  Sarah  (Blackhurst)  Bennett,  at  one  time  residents 
of  Oneida  county.  New  York,  where  the  two  sons  were  born.  Ralph  Blackhurst  was 
born  in  1883.  while  the  birth  of  Leigh  Smith  Bennett  occurred  in  1885.  The  family 
was  an  old  one  in  the  state  of  New  York  and  came  of  the  same  ancestral  stock  as 
Commodore  Perry.  The  representatives  of  the  family  had  been  farmers  in  the 
Empire  state  for  many  generations.  The  Blackhurst  family  was  also  an  old  one  in 
America,  being  descended  from  James  Blackhurst,  a  native  of  England,  who  came  to 
the  new  world  about  the  time  of  the  signing  of  the   Declaration  of   Independence. 

Ralph  Blackhurst  Bennett  was  educated  in  the  graded  and  high  schools  of  Water- 
ville.  New  York,  and  in  Y'ale  University,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1906  with 
the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree.  He  spent  the  year  following  his  graduation  in  tutoring 
and  then  took  up  newspaper  work  as  a  profession,  accepting  a  position  on  the  Utica 
Daily  Press.  He  remained  with  that  paper  for  two  years  and  then  accepted  an  offer 
as  editor  of  the  Connecticut  Western  News,  with  which  he  was  thus  associated  for  a 
year.     Attracted    by    the    opportunities    of    the    new    and    growing    west    he    left    New 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  213 

England  and  made  his  way  to  Oregon,  where  he  become  a  reporter  and  later  a  tele- 
graph editor  with  the  Portland  Telegram.  After  two  years'  connection  with  that  paper 
he  and  his  brother  L^igh  purchased  the  Ashland  Tidings  which  they  published  for  a 
year.  At  length  they  sold  the  Tidings  and  removed  to  Hood  River,  becoming  owners 
of  the  Hood  River  News,  conducting  it  for  eight  years.  The  participation  of  America 
in  the  "World  war  brought  about  the  sale  of  the  News  and  Ralph  B.  Bennett  tendered 
his  services  to  his  country  and  entered  the  officers'  training  camp  at  Eugene,  Oregon. 
He  was  ordered  from  there  to  Camp  McArthur  in  Texas  and  was  still  in  training  when 
the  armistice  was  signed.  Returning  to  Hood  River,  in  association  with  his  brother 
he  established  the  Bennett  Brothers  Garage  and  they  have  since  conducted  a  gratifying 
and   growing  business. 

Ralph  B.  Bennett  was  married  in  1919  to  Miss  Anne  Helen  Johnson  of  Seattle, 
Washington,  and  they  are  widely  and  favorably  known  at  Hood  River.  Mr.  Bennett 
is  a  member  of  the  Oregon  Editorial  Association,  also  of  the  Hood  River  Commercial 
Club.  He  is  a  Mason  and  also  a  Knight  of  Pythias  and  his  religious  faith  is  indicated 
in  the  fact  that  he  is  now  serving  as  vestryman  of  St.  Mark's  Episcopal  church. 

Leigh  Smith  Bennett  was  educated  in  the  graded  and  high  schools  of  Waterville 
and  in  the  Eastman  Business  College  of  New  York.  Through  the  succeeding  six 
years  following  his  graduation  he  was  employed  as  an  accountant  in  New  York  and 
then  removed  to  Portland,  Oregon,  where  he  engaged  in  the  printing  business.  On 
selling  his  print  shop  he  became  associated  with  his  brother  Ralph  in  the  purchase  of 
the  Ashland  Tidings  and  was  business  manager  of  that  publication  and  of  the  Hood 
River  News.  After  the  close  of  the  World  war  he  and  his  brother  established  the 
garage  which  they  still  own  and  which  is  accorded  a  liberal  patronage.  Theirs  is  one 
of  the  largest  and  best  equipped  garages  on  the  Columbia  River  highway.  It  is  a 
concrete  structure  with  a  floor  space  of  thirty  thousand  square  feet,  divided  into  office, 
salesroom,  accessory  department,  storage  and  repair  shop.  The  firm  acts  as  agent 
for  the  Dodge  Brothers  and  Chandler  cars  and  the  garage  is  a  Dodge  Brothers  service 
station.  The  firm  is  also  agent  for  the  John  Deere  farm  implements  and  carries  a  full 
line  of  orchard  supplies,  including  the  Hardie  sprayer. 

In  1919  Leigh  S.  Bennett  was  married  to  Miss  Sadie  Noyes  of  Portland,  a  descend- 
ant of  one  of  the  pioneer  families  of  Oregon,  her  father  having  been  for  many  years 
captain  of  river  boats  and  widely  known  as  a  highly  respected  citizen  of  this  part  of 
the  state.  No  young  men  in  the  Hood  River  valley  are  more  highly  respected  in  busi- 
ness and   social    circles   than   Ralph    B.   and   Leigh    Smith    Bennett. 


FREDERICK   W.   LEADBETTER. 

Frederick  W.  Leadbetter,  a  man  of  the  keenest  business  judgment,  has  been 
eminently  successful  in  his  undertakings  and  his  important  and  extensive  business 
interests  rank  him  with  the  leading  capitalists  of  the  state.  A  native  of  Iowa,  Mr. 
Leadbetter  was  born  in  Clinton  in  1870  and  is  a  son  of  Charles  H.  Leadbetter,  whose 
birth  occurred  in  Northmead,  Maine,  in  1840.  The  father  was  married  in  Brooklyn, 
New  York,  to  Ann  Matilda  Cummings  and  his  demise  occurred  in  1905.  The  mother 
survives  and  is  residing  in   Santa  Barbara,  California. 

In  the  schools  of  Maine,  New  York  and  California  Frederick  W.  Leadbetter  pursued 
his  education,  becoming  a  student  in  the  State  Normal  School  at  San  Jose,  California. 
When  twenty-one  years  of  age  he  laid  aside  his  textbooks  to  enter  the  business  world 
in  connection  with  irrigation  interests  in  Yakima,  Washington,  with  which  he  was 
identified  for  two  years.  He  then  came  to  Portland  and  in  1894  became  connected 
with  the  advertising  department  of  The  Oregonian,  so  continuing  for  two  years.  He 
then  began  the  manufacture  of  paper  at  Camas,  Washington,  establishing  an  enter- 
prise that  has  since  developed  to  mammoth  proportions,  being  now  a  part  of  the 
Crown-Willamette  Paper  Company,  having  the  largest  factories  of  any  similar  enter- 
prise in  the  world,  the  daily  capacity  being  seven  hundred  and  fifty  tons.  The 
California-Oregon  Paper  Mills,  of  which  Mr.  Leadbetter  is  president,  maintain  mills 
at  Los  Angeles,  California,  and  at  Vancouver,  Washington,  in  addition  to  the  Camas 
plant,  and  he  is  likewise  vice  president  and  half  owner  of  the  Spalding  Logging 
Company,  with  mills  at  Salem,  McMinnville  and  Newberg,  Oregon.  His  notable  busi- 
ness acumen,  keen  sagacity  and  powers  of  organization  have  been  manifested  along 
Kiany  lines  of  endeavor  and  he  is  now  serving  as  president  of  the  Pittock  &  Leadbetter 


214  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

Lumber  Company  the  Industrial  Land  Company,  the  Camas  Water  Company,  the 
Camas  Booming  Company,  the  Camas  Sheep  &  Cattle  Company,  the  Oregon  Pulp  & 
Paper  Company,  the  Pittock  &  Leadbetter  Company  and  La  Camas  Mill  &  Flume 
Company.  A  man  of  clear  vision  and  a  keen  observer,  he  has  always  borne  an  unas- 
sailable reputation  for  integrity  and  reliability  in  all  business  matters  and  his  activi- 
ties have  ever  been  of  a  constructive  nature,  contributing  to  public  progress  and 
prosperity  as  well  as  to  individual   aggrandizement. 

On  the  27th  of  September,  1S94,  Mr.  Leadbetter  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Caroline  P.  Pittoek.  a  daughter  of  the  late  Henry  L.  Pittock,  who  was  widely  known 
in  journalistic  circles  of  the  northwest  as  managing  owner  and  publisher  of  The 
Oregonian  and  whose  career  was  inseparably  linked  with  that  of  Portland.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Leadbetter  have  become  the  parents  of  four  children:  Georgiana,  the  wife  of 
Major  Frank  B.  Andreae;    Pittock;   Dorothy  Rose;    and  Elizabeth. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Leadbetter  is  a  republican  and  in  religious  faith  he  is 
an  Episcopalian.  His  social  nature  finds  expression  in  his  membership  in  the  Arlington, 
Waverly,  Multnomah,  Press,  Ad,  Portland  Rowing  and  Commercial  Clubs,^  all  of  Port- 
land, and  of  the  last  named  organization  he  at  one  time  served  as  president.  He  is 
also  identified  with  the  Pacific  Union,  San  Francisco  and  Santa  Barbara  Clubs,  the 
Racket  &  Tennis  Club  of  New  York,  and  the  Metropolitan  Club  of  Washington,  D.  C. 
He  is  active  in  local  charitable  organizations  and  is  an  enthusiastic  sportsman,  ex- 
celling at  polo.  He  plays  a  good  game  of  tennis  and  golf  and  also  enjoys  hunting  and 
fishing.  He  is  likewise  fond  of  good  literature  and  possesses  an  unusual  knowledge 
of  history  for  a  man  of  such  varied  and  extensive  business  interests.  Soon  after  the 
declaration  of  war  with  Germany  he  enlisted  in  the  Oregon  National  Guard  and  was 
elected  captain  of  Troop  C.  He  was  later  transferred  to  Washington,  D.  C,  where  he 
remained  until  the  fall  of  1918,  when  he  was  sent  to  France  on  a  special  mission  and 
so  served  until  after  the  signing  of  the  armistice,  being  discharged  in  December, 
1918,  as  major  in  the  regular  army,  following  which  he  returned  to  Portland  to,  take 
charge  of  his  extensive  business  interests.  Much  of  his  life  has  been  passed  in  posi- 
tions of  executive  control,  in  which  his  energies  have  been  largely  concentrated  upon 
organization,  constructive  effort  and  administrative  direction.  His  initiative  spirit 
and  notable  ability  have  carried  him  into  important  relations  and  the  breadth  and  scope 
of  his  activities  entitle  him  to  classification  with  the  builders  of  the  great  northwest. 
He  stands  for  all  that  is  truly  American  in  citizenship,  upholding  the  interests  of  com- 
munity and  country  at  all  times,  and  his  cooperation  can  ever  be  counted  upon  to 
further  any  movement  for  the  public  good.  His  has  been  a  life  of  intense  and  well 
directed  activity   and   the   worth   of  his   work   is  widely  acknowledged. 


REV.  HANS  HANSEN. 


Rev.  Hans  Hansen,  who  devoted  his  active  life  to  the  work  of  the  ministry  and 
left  the  impress  of  his  individuality  and  ability  upon  the  moral  progress  of  every 
community  with  which  he  was  connected,  spent  his  last  days  in  Portland.  He  was  born 
in  Schleswig-Holstein,  Germany,  August  22,  1836,  a  son  of  John  Henry  and  Anna 
(Knutte)  Hansen.  The  mother  passed  away  when  her  son  was  but  five  years  of  age. 
He  spent  the  period  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  in  his  native  country  and  in  1856 
set  sail  for  America,  going  first  to  Minnesota.  He  was  there  located  at  the  time  the 
Civil  war  broke  out  and  he  enlisted  as  a  member  of  Company  H,  Seventh  Regiment 
of  Minnesota  Volunteers,  in  1862.  Thus  joining  the  "boys  in  blue,"  he  served  for  three 
years  and  participated  in  several  of  the  hotly  contested  engagements  which  figure 
most  prominently  in  the  history  of  that  struggle.  He  was  mustered  out  as  a  sergeant 
at  Fort   Snelling,  Minnesota,  August  16,  1865. 

Returning  to  his  home  in  that  state  Mr.  Hansen  took  up  a  course  of  study  in 
preparation  for  tlie  ministry  and  in  1866  accepted  a  call  to  the  church  at  Henderson, 
Minnesota,  and  for  several  years  was  engaged  in  circuit  work.  With  his  removal  to 
the  northwest  he  settled  first  in  Tacoma,  Washington,  where  he  engaged  in  preaching 
for  two  years  and  then  came  to  Portland,  after  which  he  filled  a  pastorate  at  Mil- 
waukie.  Oregon,  for  one  year.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  went  to  Whatcom, 
now  Bellingham,  Washington,  to  open  up  a  new  field  for  church  work  and  there 
continued  for  three  years.  Later  he  returned  to  Tacoma,  spending  some  time  there 
and  subsequently  again  became  a  resident   of  Portland,  where  he  remained  until   his 


REV.  HANS  HANSEN 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  217 

death.  During  the  many  years  which  he  devoted  to  the  ministry  he  occupied  various 
pastorates  and  contributed  in  large  measure  to  the  upbuilding  of  the  churches  in  the 
different  sections  in  which  he  labored.  In  1902  he  retired  from  the  active  work  of  the 
ministry  and  spent  his  remaining  days  in  the  enjoyment  of  well  earned  rest.  He 
passed  away  at  his  home  May  19,  1920. 

On  the  9th  of  July,  1859,  Mr.  Hansen  was  married  to  Miss  Louise  Warnecke,  the 
wedding  being  celebrated  at  Henderson,  Minnesota.  They  became  the  parents  of 
nine  children,  six  of  whom  are  living:  Mary,  the  wife  of  J.  H.  Mallett  of  Portland; 
J.  G.;  W.  A.;   B.  H.;   Helen;   and  L.  H.     Edward,  Anna  and  George  have  passed  away. 

Mr.  Hansen  gave  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party,  of  which  he 
was  always  a  stalwart  supporter.  He  belonged  also  to  Lents  Post,  G.  A.  R.,  and  thus 
maintained  pleasant  relations  with  his  old  army  comrades.  In  all  matters  of  citi- 
zenship he  was  as  true  and  loyal  to  his  country  as  when  he  followed  the  nation's 
starry  banner  on  the  battle  fields  of  the  south.  He  was  always  actuated  by  a  spirit  of 
progress  in  everything  he  undertook  and  it  was  this  which  led  him  to  seek  a  home  in 
the  new  world,  while  throughout  his  life  he  was  connected  with  those  interests 
and  activities  which  sought  the  advancement  of  the  race  and  the  uplift  of  the  individual. 
His  life  was  indeed  a  blessing  to  humanity  and  his  name  is  revered  and  honored 
wherever  he  was  known. 


DONALD  FRENCH  SKENE. 


Donald  F.  Skene,  cattle  breeder  and  secretary  and  manager  of  the  Oregon  City 
Abstract  Company,  is  residing  on  his  farm  two  miles  south  of  Oregon  City.  He  is  a 
native  of  Kansas  being  born  in  that  state  in  1877,  at  Westmoreland,  a  son  of  Charles 
A.  and  Hannah  M.  (Williams)  Skene.  His  father  was  a  Scotchman  by  birth  and 
first  settled  in  Illinois,  later  removing  to  Kansas.  He  was  a  physician  and  prac- 
ticed in  Kansas  for  more  than  fifty  yeai-s. 

Mr.  Skene  received  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Kansas  and  at  an  early  age 
engaged  in  the  abstract  business.  He  engaged  in  that  business  in  his  native  state 
for  live  years  and  then  failing  in  health,  came  to  Oregon  in  1900  nd  in  this  state 
concluded  to  locate.  He  established  The  Dalles  Abstract  Company,  which  he  operated 
for  six  years,  when  he  sold  that  plant  and  removed  to  Eugene.  At  that  place  he 
established  the  Lane  County  Abstract  Company,  in  which  business  he  continued  until 
1911,  when  he  again  sold  and  removed  to  Oregon  City.  He  subsequently  established 
the  Oregon  City  Abstract  Company  of  which  he  is  still  secretary  and  manager.  This 
abstract  company  has  the  only  absolutely  complete  plant  in  the  county  which  is  kept 
up  to  date,  and  it  has  gained  such  a  reputation  than  an  abstract  from  this  company 
is  never  questioned.  Aside  tro.m  the  abstract  business  Mr.  Skene  is  interested  in 
cattle  breeding  and  is  now  giving  his  attention  to  the  breeding  of  registered  Jersey 
cattle,  and  has  an  imported  bull  that  promises  to  be  a  world  premium  winner  within 
a  season  or  two.  Mr.  Skene  has  devoted  all  of  his  time  to  his  business  and  although 
a  progressive  and  public  spirited  man,  has  never  found  time  to  hold  political  office. 

In  1907  Mr.  Skene  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mildred  Breakey,  a  daughter 
of  James  Breakey  of  Downs,  Kansas,  who  is  a  pioneer  farmer  and  a  man  of  import- 
ance in  his  section  of  the  country.  Four  children  have  been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Skene,  namely:  Pamela  H.;  Jean  Donna;  Jo  M.;  and  Donald  J.,  all  of  whom  are 
pupils   in   the   grade   schools   of   the   county. 

Mr.  Skene  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  the  Moose,  in  which  he 
takes  an  active  interest,  and  this  same  interest  has  also  characterized  his  business 
affairs  and  has  been  one  of  the  big  elements  in  his  success. 


HON.  ALBERT  STURGIS  ROBERTS. 

Hon.  Albert  Sturgis  Roberts  of  The  Dalles,  who  is  one  of  the  leading  wheat  rais- 
ers of  Oregon  and  a  prominent  business  man  and  citizen,  has  served  his  state  in  many 
ways,  while  his  legislative  record  was  marked  by  continuous  devotion  to  the  general 
good  of  the  commonwealth.  He  is  a  native  son  of  the  northwest,  thoroughly  imbued 
with  the  spirit  of  enterprise  and   progress   which   has   been   the  dominating   factor   in 


218  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

the  upbuilding  of  this  section  of  the  country.  He  was  born  at  White  Salmon,  Washing- 
ton, in  1862,  his  parents  being  Ephraim  P.  and  Myra  (Farrington)  Roberts.  His  father 
■was  a  native  of  Vermont  and  a  descendant  of  old  New  England  stock  that  for  many 
generations  has  been  represented  on  this  side  of  the  Atlantic.  Ephraim  P.  Roberts 
was  a  missionary  to  the  Pacific  islands  for  many  years.  At  length  he  retired  from 
the  active  work  of  the  ministry  and  settled  in  Oregon,  taking  up  his  abode  at  White 
Salmon  in  1861.  He  wedded  Myra  Farrington,  a  representative  in  the  sixth  generation 
of  the  descendants  of  John  Farrington,  who  took  up  his  abode  in  Vermont  in  1640 
and  is  mentioned  on  the  pages  of  New  England's  history  as  Deacon  John  Farrington. 
This  family  was  represented  in  the  Revolutionary  war,  again  in  the  War  of  1812  and 
in  the  Civil  war,  the  ancestral  line  coming  down  from  Deacon  John  Farrington 
through  his  fourth  child,  Daniel  Farrington,  to  Benjamin  Farrington  and  John  Far- 
rington, the  latter  the  father  of  Daniel  Farrington,  who  was  the  father  of  Mrs.  Myra 
Roberts. 

Albert  S.  Roberts  whose  name  introduces  this  review  was  educated  in  the  graded 
schools  of  The  Dalles  and  in  the  University  of  Oregon.  Becoming  a  resident  of  Wasco 
county,  he  turned  his  attention  to  ranching  interests  in  early  life.  His  present  hold- 
ings are  located  about  twenty  miles  southeast  of  The  Dalles,  on  the  Deschutes  river, 
and  embrace  seventy-five  hundred  acres,  devoted  to  the  raising  of  stock  and  grain, 
three  thousand  acres  being  planted  in  wheat,  which  yields  an  income  of  about  forty 
thousand  dollars  per  annum.  The  extensive  business  conducted  with  the  development, 
management  and  control  of  this  mammoth  property  places  Mr.  Roberts  among  the 
representative  ranchers  and  wheat  growers  of  Oregon.  His  plans  have  ever  been 
carefully  formulated  and  promptly  executed  and  his  enterprise  has  enabled  him  to 
overcome  all  obstacles  and  difficulties  in  his  path  and  work  his  way  steadily  upward 
to  success. 

Not  alone  in  promoting  the  material  interests  of  the  state  has  Mr.  Roberts  been 
active,  for  he  has  figured  in  connection  with  the  political  history  as  well.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  Oregon  legislature  in  1898-9  and  again  in  1901  and  was  regarded  during 
those  periods  as  one  of  the  able  lawmakers  of  the  state.  He  acted  as  chairman  of 
the  fish  and  game  committee  and  saved  the  fish  wheels  of  the  upper  Columbia  river, 
thereby  wining  the  gratitude  of  his  constituents.  He  was  also  made  chairman  of  the 
committee  on  counties  and  many  of  the  newer  counties  of  the  state  were  created  and 
named  by  his  coaimittee.  For  five  years  he  was  a  member  of  the  school  board  and  his 
work  for  the  advancement  of  education  in  The  Dalles  has  been  of  a  character  that 
entitles  him  to  the  gratitude  and  high  regard  of  all  who  have  interest  in  the  public 
school  system.  While  he  was  on  a  trip  to  the  east  in  1920  his  neighbors  circulated  a 
petition  for  the  placing  of  his  name  on  the  ballot  as  the  republican  candidate  for  the 
legislature  from  his  district,  comprising  Wasco  and  Hood  River  counties.  Though  he 
felt  that  he  had  retired  from  politics  he  was  forced  to  accept  the  nomination,  feeling 
that  when  this  public  demand  was  made  for  his  services  it  was  his  duty  to  meet  the 
requirements  of  his   fellow  citizens. 

Mr.  Roberts  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Rose  Freeman,  daughter  of  Marvin 
W.  Freeman,  one  of  the  highly  esteemed  citizens  and  valued  farmers  of  central 
Oregon.  Mrs.  Roberts  is  conceded  to  be  an  ideal  mother,  her  six  stalwart  sons  giving 
evidence  of  her  devotion  and  care.  In  1919  death  called  the  eldest  son,  AUyn  F., 
who  was  stricken  with  influenza  and  passed  away  after  an  illness  of  less  than  a  week, 
leaving  not  only  his  devoted  parents  but  also  a  young  widow  and  three  small  chil- 
dren. His  wile  in  her  maidenhood  was  Miss  Lois  McMurphey  of  Eugene,  a  grand- 
daughter of  the  well  known  pioneer.  Dr.  Shelton.  The  remaining  sons  of  the  Roberts 
family  are:  Elliott  F.,  who  is  associated  with  his  father  in  the  management  of  the 
ranch  and  who  married  Miss  Margaret  Belat  of  The  Dalles  and  has  one  child;  Loren 
C,  who  is  associated  with  his  father  in  the  ranch  management  and  who  wedded  Miss 
Helen  Robinson  of  Eugene,  by  whom  he  has  one  child;  Roscoe  D.,  a  student  at  the 
University  of  Oregon,  from  which  institution  his  elder  brothers  graduated;  Ivan  F., 
who  is  pursuing  his  studies  in  The  Dalles;  and  Wilton  A.,  who  completes  the  family. 
The  relation  between  father  and  sons  is  more  like  that  of  brothers  than  parent  and 
children.  The  two  sons,  Elliott  and  Loren,  volunteered  for  service  in  the  World  war 
and  Elliott  was  still  in  the  officers  training  camp  when  the  armistice  was  signed, 
Loren  C.  joined  the  naval  service  and  rose  from  the  ranks  to  the  position  of  warrant 
officer.  He  developed  into  a  mechanic  of  the  first  class,  being  only  one  of  two  to  pass 
perfect  in  a  class  of  nearly  thirty.  Roscoe  was  trained  in  the  Students  Army  Train- 
ing camp. 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  219 

Mr.  Roberts  is  a  Mason  and  that  he  has  attained  high  rank  in  the  order  is  indi- 
cated in  the  fact  that  he  is  now  a  Noble  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  and  his  family 
are  consistent  members  of  the  Congregational  church,  of  which  he  has  been  a  trustee 
for  twenty-two  years  and  in  which  he  is  now  serving  as  deacon.  He  is  a  clean-cut. 
broad-minded  citizen  who  displays  the  utmost  devotion  to  his  family,  his  church  and 
his  country. 


GEORGE  JEFFERSON  PERKINS. 

Jefferson  Perkins,  senior  member  of  the  law  firm  of  Perkins  &  Bailey, 
was  born  on  a  plantation  in  Lee  county,  Alabama,  September  14,  1876.  His  father' 
Benjamin  F.  Perkins,  was  born  in  Taylor  county,  Georgia,  in  1843.  In  February^ 
1862,  he  enlisted  in  the  Confederate  Army  as  a  private  in  Company  H,  First  Alabama 
Infantry,  and  was  later  promoted  to  the  rank  of  lieutenant  of  Company  B,  First 
Alabama  Regiment.  He  served  actively  in  the  Confederate  Army  throughout  the 
Civil  war  and  was  severely  wounded  in  the  battle  of  Peach  Tree  Creek,  near  Atlanta, 
in  which  engagement  every  man  in  his  regiment  was  either  killed  or  wounded.  He 
married  Miss  Emma  McCoy,  then  a  young  school  teacher;  she  died  in  1882.  His  demise 
occurred  in  Birmingham  in  1907. 

Their  son,  George  J.  Perkins,  was  reared  in  Lee  county,  Alabama,  and  there 
attended  the  country  schools.  Subsequently  he  was  for  two  years  a  student  in  the 
Saunders  Academy  at  Notasulga,  Alabama.  At  the  age  of  nineteen  he  attended  a 
business  college  at  Columbus,  Georgia.  After  leaving  the  business  college  he  entered 
the  employ  of  the  Southern  Railway  and  the  Georgia  and  Alabama  Railway  at  Colum- 
bus, Georgia,  as  stenographer,  where  he  continued  for  two  years.  He  moved  from 
Georgia  to  Kansas,  and  during  the  next  three  years  worked  for  various  railroads 
in  the  middle  west.  In  1901  he  resigned  the  position  of  chief  clerk  to  the  superin- 
tendent of  the  Choctaw,  Oklahoma  &  Gulf  Railroad  and  entered  the  employ  of  the 
Northern  Pacific  Railroad  at  Seattle.  In  May,  1902,  he  came  to  Portland  as  claim 
investigator  for  the  Northern  Pacific  and  was  subsequently  made  chief  clerk  to  the 
freight  claim  agent  at  Portland,  which  position  he  held  until  the  latter  part  of  1905. 
While  working  in  the  freight  claim  office  during  the  day  he  studied  in  the  law 
department  of  the  University  of  Oregon  at  night  and  was  graduated  therefrom  in  1904. 
In  the  same  year  he  was  admitted  to  the  Oregon  bar.  In  the  latter  part  of  1905  he 
entered  upon  the  practice  of  his  profession,  becoming  associated  with  the  well  known 
law  firm  of  Piatt  &  Piatt  of  Portland  and  continued  with  that  firm  for  five  years. 
After  leaving  Piatt  &  Piatt  he  practiced  alone  until  1918,  when  he  formed  a  partnership 
with  John  0.'  Bailey  under  the  firm  name  of  Perkins  &  Bailey,  which  association  is 
still  continued.  Their  high  professional  attainments  have  won  for  them  the  con- 
fidence of  the  public  and  the  respect  of  the  Oregon  bar.  They  are  now  counsel  for 
many  large  corporations,  including  the  Peninsula  National  Bank,  The  Bank  of  Com- 
merce, the  Peninsula  Security  Company,  The  State  Bank  of  Hubbard,  the  Portland 
Manufacturing  Company  and  Eagle  Flour  Mills.  Mr.  Perkins  is  an  able  lawyer,  logi- 
cal' in  his  deductions  and  persevering. 

On  the  7th  of  April,  1908,  in  Portland,  Mr.  Perkins  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Gertrude  May  Timms,  a  daughter  of  the  late  Major  Harvey  M.  Timms,  a  veteran 
of  the  Civil  war  on  the  Union  side,  he  having  fought  against  Mr.  Perkins'  father  from 
Good  Hope  Church  to  Atlanta.  The  two  children  of  this  union  are:  George  J.,  Jr.,  who 
was  born  January  5,  1910;  and  Davis  McCoy,  born  November  2,  1913. 

Mr.  Perkins  is  registered  as  a  republican  but  reserves  the  right  to  vote  for  the 
man  he  regards  as  best  qualified  for  the  office  he  seeks,  without  regard  to  party 
affiliation.  He  is  an  active,  member  of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  giving  his  hearty 
support  to  all  well  devised  plans  and  projects  of  that  organization  for  the  advance- 
ment of  the  city  and  the  extension  of  its  trade  relations.  During  the  World  war 
he  served  as  a  member  of  the  legal  advisory  and  questionnaire  boards  and  also  was 
active  in  promoting  all  local  bond  drives,  doing  everything  in  his  power  to  support 
the  government  in  its  time  of  need.  He  is  a  member  of  the  County,  State  and  Ameri- 
can Bar  Associations.  He  is  a  great  admirer  of  the  natural  scenery  of  Oregon  and 
owns  an  attractive  country  place  of  about  ninety  acres  in  the  fork  of  the  Sandy 
river  and  Beaver  creek,  fourteen  miles  from  Portland,  overlooking  Sandy  river  and 
the  famous  Columbia  River  Highway  on  the  one  side  and  Beaver  creek  gorge  on  the 


220  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

other,  on  which  he  is  developing  a  diversified  orchard  and  a  fish  and  swimming  pond. 
The   most  of  his  leisure  time   is  spent   on   his   country  property. 

Mr.  Perkins  is  a  man  of  most  exemplary  character,  whose  integrity  and  honesty 
have  never  been  questioned  and  his  life  is  an  excellent  illustration  of  what  can  he 
accomplished  through  individual  effort.  Working  untiringly  to  gain  a  start  he  has 
steadily  progressed  in  his  professional  career  and  his  unwearied  industry  and  per- 
severance have  been  the  salient  points  in  his  continued  success.  He  has  attained 
high  rank  in  his  pro;'ession  and  Portland  regards  him  as  one  Oi  her  representative 
and  valued   citizens. 


HIRAM   B.   LEE. 


Since  1915  Hiram  B.  Lee  has  been  living  retired  in  Milton,  enjoying-  the  rewards 
of  a  life  spent  in  diligence  and  industry.  He  was  born  in  Jackson  county,  Illinois, 
on  the  20th  of  December,  1844,  a  son  of  Richard  and  Elizabeth  (Burns)  Lee.  The 
father  was  born  in  old  Jacksonville,  Illinois,  while  the  mother  was  a  native  of  Mis- 
souri, her  birth  having  occurred   in   Perry   county. 

Hiram  B.  Lee  spent  his  boyhood  in  Illinois,  where  he  received  a  good  common 
school  education.  When  but  eight  years  of  age  he  lost  his  father  and  he  was  there- 
after thrown  upon  his  own  resources  to  a  great  extent.  In  1862.  when  but  eighteen 
years  of  age,  he  enlisted  in  the  Union  army,  joining  Coiipany  A,  Eightieth  Illinois 
Infantry.  He  participated  in  the  battle  of  Perrysville,  Kentucky,  in  1862,  and  was 
with  Colonel  Hall  in  the  battles  of  Vaught  Hill  in  Tennessee.  Missionary  Ridge  and 
the  battle  of  Resaca,  Georgia,  as  well  as  other  engagements.  He  received  his  discharge 
at  Springfield,  Illinois,  and  returned  to  his  home  and  worked  for  some  time  for  his 
uncle,  A.  R.  Burns.  His  mother  had  married  again  and  leaving  her  well  cared  for  Mr. 
Lee  came  west  in  1869,  traveling  overland  by  ox  teams.  He  settled  where  Milton 
now  stands  and  there  took  up  a  soldier's  ho.aiestead  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres, 
which  he  immediately  set  about  to  improve.  This  land  was  located  in  range  35,  town- 
ship 5,  and  from  time  to  time  he  added  to  the  original  tract  until  he  had  a  fine  farm 
of  three  hundred  and  sixty-five  acres.  In  the  operation  of  his  land  he  realized  a 
gratifying  a.nount  of  success  and  in  1915  he  retired  from  active  business  life  and 
built  a  fine  ho.ne  in  Milton,  where  he  is  now  residing.  He  was  readily  conceded  to  be 
a  representative  citizen  of  Milton  and  from  June,  1906,  to  January  1,  1911,  he  served 
his  fellow  citizens  as  a  county  commissioner. 

On  the  12th  of  November,  1877,  Mr.  Lee  was  married  to  Miss  Sarah  E.  Moore,  a 
daughter  of  James  and  Barbara  (Waiker)  Moore,  ana  a  nauve  oi  Surry  county. 
North  Carolina.  Her  father  died  a  prisoner  during  the  Civil  war  and  her  mother 
later  removed  west  with  her  little  family.  For  four  years  they  lived  in  Iowa,  then 
Cheyenne  and  Laramie,  Wyoming,  and  subsequently  re.noved  to  Weston,  Umatilla  county, 
Oregon.  The  death  of  Mrs.  Moore  occurred  near  Weston,  at  the  home  of  a  son-in- 
law.  To  the  union  oi  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lee  six  children  were  born:  Richard  E.,  Daisy, 
James,  Minnie,  Robert,  and  Rosa. 

Throughout  his  life  Mr.  Lee  has  been  a  stanch  supporter  of  the  republican  party, 
having  firm  faith  in  the  principles  of  that  party  as  factors  in  good  government.  He 
is  an  active  member  of  the  local  chapter  of  the  Grand  Array  of  the  Republic.  Mr. 
Lee  has  always  had  much  faith  in  Umatilla  county  and  his  faith  has  not  been  un- 
founded. He  assisted  in  the  erection  of  the  first  house  in  Milton  and  since  then 
his  interests  in  the  develop.iient  and  iaiprovement  of  the  community  have  never 
ceased.  His  success  has  been  the  result  of  his  own  effort  and  he  is  regarded  as  an 
exemplary  citizen  of  Milton. 


FRANK  BEARDSLEY. 


Frank  Beardsley,  who  spent  his  last  days  in  Portland,  where  he  passed  away 
November  25,  1919,  was  a  representative  of  two  of  the  oldest  American  families.  He 
was  born  in  the  town  of  Jordan,  Onondaga  county.  New  York,  October  27,  1839,  and 
was  a  son  of  Joseph  and  Matilda  D.  (Field)  Beardsley.  One  of  the  historians  of  the 
Beardsley  family  says:   "The  name  dates  back  many  centuries.     In  the  arena  of  states- 


FRANK   BEARDSLEY 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  .  223 

manship  it  produced  men  of  thought  and  men  of  action;  as  authors  they  are  worthy 
to  be  crowned  with  the  laurel  of  fame;  as  builders  and  merchants  have  illumined 
marts  of  trade;  as  heroes  of  Colonial  and  Revolutionary  wars  rendered  patriotic 
service.  Their  coat  of  arms  indicates  the  best  traits  of  chivalry.  The  name  has 
appeared  upon  historical  records  in  a  variety  of  forms.  Robert  de  Bardesle  and  Wil- 
liam de  Bardesle  are  mentioned  on  the  Hundred  Rolls.  Bardseys  were  living  in 
Lancashire,  England,  in  the  time  of  Charles  I.  Bardsea  was  adopted  as  a  surname 
about  1211,  and  from  that  time  down  the  name  appeared  in  various  forms."  In 
England  today  the  name  is  spelled  Beardley  or  Bardsley.  The  Pilgrim  ancestor  was 
William  Beardsley,  who  came  from  England  in  1635,  on  the  ship  Planter,  and  was 
one  of  the  settlers  and  proprietors  of  Stratford,  Connecticut.  He  was  accompanied 
by  his  wife,  Mary,  and  three  children,  and  four  children  were  born  to  them  in  the 
new  world.  When  he  was  admitted  a  freeman  he  spelled  his  name  Beardesley  and  in 
his  will  signed  Beardsly.  Old  records  indicate  him  a  man  of  worth,  influence  and 
substance.  In  his  will  his  son  Joseph  was  offered  certain  advantages  if  he  married 
and  quit  the  sea,  which  he  evidently  did.  His  son  Samuel  became  one  of  the  founders 
of  Bridgeport,  Connecticut,  and  a  charter  member  of  its  first  church.  Members  of 
the  family  have  left  their  Impress  upon  the  legislative  and  judicial  history  of  the 
country,  while  Eben  Beardsley,  born  in  Connecticut  in  1808,  was  a  writer  of  fame. 
Various  representatives  of  the  name  served  in  the  Revolutionary  war,  including 
Ebenezer  Beardsley,  who  was  surgeon's  mate  in  1775  and  a  surgeon  of  infantry  from 
1776  until  1778;  Gershom  Beardsley  of  New  York,  who  was  hospital  surgeon's  mate 
from  1776  to  1779;  Nehemiah  Beardsley  of  Connecticut,  who  was  a  captain;  Phineas 
Beardsley  of  Connecticut,  who  was  a  captain  from  January,  1777,  to  the  close  of  1778; 
and  John  Beardsley,  sixth  in  descent  from  William  Beardsley,  the  Pilgrim,  who  served 
for  six  years  in  a  Connecticut  regiment.  The  arms  reproduced  is  argent,  two  bar 
gules,  on  a  canton  of  the  second,  a  maunch  of  the  first.  This  maunch,  or  sleeve, 
seems  to  indicate  the  best  trait  of  chivalry — a  defender  of  the  defenseless. 

Joseph  Beardsley,  father  of  Prank  Beardsley  of  this  review,  was  born  January  15, 
1816,  and  was  married  at  Elbridge,  New  York,  June  2,  1835,  to  Matilda  D.  Field. 
Not  a  dozen  families  in  Europe  can  prove  a  higher  antiquity  or  more  distinguished 
connection  than  the  Fields.  Their  history  can  be  traced  back  to  the  darkest  period 
of  the  Middle  Ages — about  the  sixth  century.  Huburtus  de  la  Feld,  of  Alsace,  France, 
went  with  William  the  Conqueror  to  England  in  1066  and  there  received  large  grants 
of  land  and  became  the  founder  of  the  English  family.  During  the  war  between 
England  and  France  the  Felds  dropped  the  prefix  de  la  and  changed  the  spelling  to 
the  present  form.  The  ancestors  of  Huburtus  had  been  seated  at  the  Cliateau  de  la 
Feld  in  Alsace  as  early  as  the  period  which  followed  the  fall  of  the  Roman  empire. 
The  history  of  the  family  in  England  presents  many  distinguished  names.  John 
Field  of  London,  married  Anne,  a  daughter  of  Thomas  Cromwell,  grandson  of  Oliver 
Cromwell,  and  another  branch  traces  the  ancestry  back  to  Brian  Boru,  king  of  Ire- 
land in  1001.  Sir  John  Field,  astronomer,  introduced  the  Copernican  system  into 
England,  publishing  in  1566  the  first  astronomical  table  calculated  on  the  basis  of  the 
new  discoveries. 

It  was  in  1639  that  Zechariah  Field  came  from  England  to  America.  The  coat 
of  arms  of  the  family  is  sable,  a  chevron  between  three  garbs,  argent;  or  three 
sheaves  of  wheat  on  a  black  field,  with  a  chevron.  The  motto,  Sans  Dieu  Rein,  means 
"■Without  God,  Nothing."  In  a  cemetery  of  Dorset,  Vermont,  on  an  old  monument, 
appears  the  following:  "The  Field  family,  some  of  whom  are  lying  here,  have  been 
in  Dorset  for  a  hundred  years.  For  the  century  previous  their  ancestors  lived  in 
Massachusetts  and  Connecticut,  previous  to  that  in  England  and  still  farther  back  in 
Alsace,  France.  They  have  been  an  honest  and  God-fearing  race."  Then  follows 
the  coat  of  arms,  with  the  motto  carefully  engraved.  The  ancestral  line  comes  down 
through  William,  William,  Richard.  John,  John,  to  Zechariah,  the  founder  of  the 
family  in  the  new  world.  Then  followed  two  Samuels,  the  younger  being  the  father 
of  Colonel  David  Field,  great-great-grandfather  of  Frank  Beardsley  of  this  review. 
He  was  born  in  Hatfield.  Massachusetts,  January  4,  1712.  and  was  married  in  1740 
to  Mrs.  Thankful  Doolittle,  a  daughter  of  Thomas  Taylor.  She  was  born  July  18,  1716, 
and  died  March  6,  1803.  Colonel  David  Field  engaged  in  merchandising  at  Deerfield, 
Massachusetts,  and  in  trade  with  the  Indians  on  the  Mohawk  river.  From  his  gen- 
erosity and  great  losses  during  the  Revolutionary  war,  he  failed  in  business.  He  was 
a  member  of  the  first  Massachusetts  congress,  which  met  in  Concord  in  1774,  and  the 
one  at  Cambridge   in   1775.     He  was   also  a  member   of  the   Massachusetts   council   of 


224  HISTORY  OF  OKEGOX 

safety,  was  commissary  general  under  General  Stark  at  the  battle  of  Bennington, 
August  16,  1777,  and  for  a  short  time  commanded  a  regiment— the  Fifth  Hampshire 
County  Regiment — but  resigned  because  of  his  age,  which  was  then  sixty-six  years. 

His  son,  Major  Elihu  Field,  born  in  Deerfield,  Massachusetts,  October  16,  1753. 
was  married  December  29,  1774,  to  Hepzibah  Dickinson,  daughter  of  Captain  Thomas 
Dickinson.  He  was  associated  with  his  father  in  real  estate  dealings  and  merchan- 
dising and  the  losses  which  they  suffered  during  the  Revolutionary  war  left  him 
without  means.  In  March,  1787,  he  removed  to  Guilford,  Vermont,  where  in  1791 
he  built  a  home  that  is  still  standing.  He  belonged  to  what  was  called  "The  Alarm" 
in  the  Revolutionary  war.  his  duty  being  to  give  notice  of  the  approach  of  the  enemy 
and  to  look  after  the  Tories.  He  served  under  his  father  at  the  battle  of  Bennington 
and  afterward  as  a  private  in  Captain  William  Humphries'  Company.  He  became  a 
major  of  the  first  organized  militia  of  Vermont  and  filled  various  ofRcea  at  Guilford, 
was  justice  of  the  peace  tor  twenty  years,  United  States  deputy  marshal  in  1810 
and  internal  revenue  assessor  at  the  time  of  his  death,  August  23,  1814.  His  wife, 
Hepzibah  Field,  was  born  May  10,  1753,  at  Deerfield,  Massachusetts,  and  died  in  March, 
1843.  She  was  acquainted  with  many  who  figured  prominently  in  the  Revolutionary 
war   and   her   reminiscences   thereof   were   most    interesting. 

Hon.  Henry  Field,  Sr..  son  of  Elihu  and  Hepzibah  (Dickinson)  Field,  was  born 
in  Deerfield,  Massachusetts,  August  18,  1779,  and  in  1787  went  with  his  father  to 
Guilford,  Vermont.  In  1793  he  removed  to  Elbridge,  New  York,  where  he  engaged 
in  farming,  merchandising  and  in  other  business.  He  also  held  various  town  and 
county  offices  and  was  a  member  of  the  state  legislature  in  1822.  He  was  married 
December  20,  1807,  to  Lucinda  Frisbie,  who  was  born  in  Branford,  Connecticut,  Feb- 
ruary 17,  1783.  In  1838  they  removed  to  Bellevue.  Iowa,  where  the  wife  passed  away 
May  5,  1858,  and  where  Henry  Field's  death  occurred  April  IS,  1868.  The  fifth  of 
their  family  of  eight  children  was  Matilda  D.,  who  was  born  January  15,  1816,  and 
on  the  2d  of  June,  1835,  became  the  wife  of  Joseph  Beardsley  at  Elbridge,  New  York. 
She  married  a  second  time  January  16,  1851,  becoming  the  wife  of  W.  A.  Warren,  of 
Bellevue.    Iowa,   and   her   death    occurred    September    24,    1858. 

Frank  Beardsley,  son  of  Joseph  and  Matilda  D.  (Field)  Beardsley,  was  reared 
in  the  Empire  state  but  removed  westward  to  Minnesota  at  an  early  period  in  the 
development  of  that  region,  and  there  he  met  and  married  Sarah  L.  Brown,  a  daugh- 
ter of  John  C.  and  Eliza  (Harkins)  Brown,  who  were  natives  of  Pennsylvania  and 
who  in  pioneer  times  had  become  residents  of  Wisconsin  and  afterward  drove  with 
an  ox  team  to  Minnesota,  crossing  the  Mississippi  river  at  La  Crosse.  They  located 
at  Winona,  Minnesota,  when  but  one  house  was  there.  Mr.  Beardsley  spent  much  of 
his  life  in  Minnesota  but  in  1889  sought  the  opportunities  of  the  Pacific  coast  country, 
making  his  way  to  Oregon.  He  lived  for  a  time  at  Eugene  and  at  Bend  and  subse- 
quently removed  to  South  Bend,  Pacific  county,  Washington.  He  later  became  a 
resident  of  Clarke  county,  Washington,  where  he  resided  until  his  removal  to  Port- 
land in  1910.     In  this  city  his  remaining  days  were  passed. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Beardsley  were  born  six  children:  May  Matilda,  who  is  now 
the  wife  of  William  Green:  Frances  L.,  the  wife  of  Ralph  Boothby:  Frank;  Agnes  L.; 
Walter  P.:  and  Geraldine.  The  family  circle  was  broken  by  the  hand  of  death  when 
on  the  25th  of  November,  1919,  the  husband  and  father  was  called  to  his  final  rest. 
In  politics  he  had  been  a  stanch  republican  and  was  ever  a  consistent  member  of  the 
Episcopal  church.  His  had  been  a  well  spent  life,  in  harmony  with  the  record  of 
an  honored  ancestry.  His  course  was  always  marked  by  the  same  fidelity  and  loyalty 
to  duty  in  all  matters  of  citizenship  and  his  sterling  worth  was  recognized  by  all 
with  whom  he  came  into  contact. 


FRANKLIN  IDE  FULLER. 


Various  corporate  interests  have  felt  the  stimulus  and  profited  by  the  cooperation 
of  Franklin  Ide  Fuller,  who,  however,  has  concentrated  his  efforts  largely  upon  the 
interests  of  the  Portland  Railway.  Light  &  Power  Company,  of  which  he  has  for  a 
number  of  years  been  the  vice  president.  Honored  and  respected  by  all,  there  is  no 
man  who  occupies  a  more  enviable  position  in  business  and  financial  circles,  not  only 
by  reason  of  the  success  he  has  accomplished  but  also  owing  to  the  straightforward 
and  progressive  business  methods  which  he  has  always  utilized.     It  has  ever  been  his 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  225 

custom  to  study  thoroughly  and  understand  every  phase  of  every  business  with  which 
he  has  become  connected,  and  thoroughness  has  ever  been  one  of  the  salient  features 
in  his  successful  career. 

Descended  from  New  England  ancestry  long  connected  with  American  interests, 
Franklin  Ide  Fuller  was  born  in  Providence,  Rhode  Island,  May  29,  1858,  his  parents 
being  Leonard  F.  and  Mary  I.  Fuller.  He  became  a  public  school  pupil  at  the  usual 
age  and  when  he  had  completed  his  studies  of  that  character  he  became  a  student  in 
the  office  of  the  city  engineer  of  Providence  and  there  received  both  practical  and 
theoretical  training,  for  he  acquainted  himself  with  the  scientific  phases  and  principles 
of  the  business  as  presented  by  the  best  textbooks  on  the  subject.  Step  by  step  he 
advanced  as  the  result  of  his  increasing  efficiency  and  after  four  years  in  the  office 
of  the  city  engineer  he  entered  the  railway  service  and  was  engaged  on  location  and 
construction  work  in  both  New  York  and  Wisconsin. 

Mr.  Fuller  dates  his  residence  in  Oregon  from  1883,  business  interests  bringing  him 
to  the  northwest  as  the  representative  of  the  Northern  Pacific  Terminal  Company.  He 
was, employed  in  his  professional  capacity  on  railway  and  other  improvements  then  in 
progress,  and  following  the  failure  of  the  Northern  Pacific  and  cessation  of  railway 
work  in  the  northwest,  Mr.  Fuller  took  up  the  business  of  contracting,  which  he  fol- 
lowed for  four  years,  giving  his  attention  largely  to  railway  and  heavy  timber  work. 
For  three  years  he  was  connected  with  the  Oregon  Iron  &  Steel  Company  at  Oswego, 
Oregon,  working  on  the  construction  of  the  blast  furnace  and  pipe  foundry  and  acting 
as  assistant  to  the  manager  of  the  company,  while  subsequently  he  was  made  man- 
ager of  the  foundry.  He  later  engaged  in  the  real  estate  business  for  a  year  and 
became  identified  with  his  present  line  in  1892  by  accepting  the  position  of  manager 
with  the  Portland  Cable  Railway  Company.  Throughout  the  intervening  period  he 
has  concentrated  his  efforts  and  energies  upon  the  development  and  improvement  of 
the  street  railway  interests  of  Portland.  With  the  reorganization  of  the  business  under 
the  name  of  the  Portland  Traction  Company,  he  continued  to  serve  as  manager  until 
1900.  In  that  year  the  Portland  Traction  Company  and  the  Portland  Railway  Com- 
pany were  merged  under  the  latter  name  and  Mr.  Fuller  remained  as  manager  until 
1904,  when  a  merger  was  brought  about  between  the  Portland,  Railway  Company  and 
the  City  &  Suburban  Railway  Company,  thus  forming  the  Portland  Consolidated 
Railway  Company.  After  a  year  spent  as  general  manager  with'  the  newly  organized 
corporation,  the  properties  were  purchased  by  the  Clark  &  Seligman  interests  oi 
Philadelphia  and  New  York,  at  which  time  the  Portland  Railway  Company  was  organ- 
ized with  Mr.  Fuller  as  president.  He  continued  as  its  chief  executive  officer  until 
the  Portland  Railway,  Light  &  Power  Company  was  formed  and  he  was  made  vice 
president.  From  the  beginning  of  his  connection  with  the  railway  interests  of  Port- 
land he  has  been  a  most  vital  factor  in  the  development  of  the  system.  His  sound 
judgment,  his  carefully  formulated  plans,  his  initiative  and  his  professional  knowledge 
have  all  featured  actively  in  the  growth  and  advancement  of  the  business.  Another 
publication  has  said  of  him:  "No  man  in  Portland  has  such  a  complete  knowledge 
of  the  development  of  the  street  railway  system  of  the  city  as  Mr.  Franklin  Ide  Fuller, 
vice  president  of  the  Portland  Railway,  Light  &  Power  Company,  a  large  corporation. 
For  the  past  fourteen  years  Mr.  Fuller  has  been  directing  the  street  railway  lines  of 
Portland  and  has  been  the  man  who,  more  than  any  other,  brought  the  traction  lines 
to  their  present  excellent  condition.  None  other  has  had  so  large  a  part  in  the  de- 
velopment of  the  surface  lines  from  horse  and  cable  car  service  to  modern,  powerful 
electric  cars  of  the  latest  pattern.  Under  Mr.  Fuller's  direction  the  city  street  car 
lines  have  kept  pace  with  the  gi-owth  of\  the  city,  until  Portland  is  acknowledged  to 
have  a  service  on  its  traction  lines  second  to  no  city  in  the  country.  A  scenic  line 
has  been  built  around  Portland  Heights  and  has  lately  been  extended  by  a  loop 
circling  Council  Crest,  the  highest  point  near  the  city,  which  overlooks  the  city 
and  surrounding  country.  This  line  is  a  very  popular  one  and  vies  with  the  road 
up  Mount  Tamalpais  in  scenic  attractiveness."  As  the  years  have  passed  Mr.  Fuller 
has  extended  his  investments  and  active  connection  to  other  corporation  interests 
and  is  now  a  director  of  the  Portland-Oregon  Cement  Company,  also  of  the  Lumber- 
men's Trust  Company  and  vice  president  of  the  Pacific  States  Fire  Insurance  Com- 
pany. His  cooperation  is  eagerly  sought  in  business  affairs  because  of  the  recognized 
soundness  of  his  judgment. 

In  Portland,  on  the  14th  of  April,  1886,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Puller 
and  Miss  Anna  Jessie  Parrish,  a  daughter  of  the  late  L.  M.  Parrish,  who  was  one  of 
the  early  residents  of  Portland.     Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fuller  have  a  son,  Leonard  F.,  who  was 


226  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

born  in  1890  and  was  graduated  from  Cornell  University  in  1912,  while  in  1919  he 
received  from  Stanford  University  the  degree  of  Ph.  D.  He  is  now  a  well  known 
mechanical  electrical  engineer,  specializing  in  radio  work. 

In  the  club  circles  of  Portland  Mr.  Fuller  is  well  known,  having  membership  with 
the  Arlington,  Multnomah  Amateur  Athletic  and  Transportation  Clubs,  also  the  Oregon 
State  Motor  Association  and  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  while  along  professional 
lines  his  connection  is  with  the  American  Society  of  Civil  Engineers.  He  votes  with 
the  republican  party  and  he  and  his  wife  are  active  members  of  the  First  Presby- 
terian church.  His  life  has  been  dominated  by  a  spirit  of  study — a  study  not  only 
of  textbooks  and  scientific  journals  but  of  men  and  measures,  of  conditions  and  op- 
portunities. His  opinions  are  the^  result  of  careful  consideration  of  every  vital  ques- 
tion from  every  possible  standpoint  and  thus  it  is  that  he  has  become  a  most  forceful 
factor  in  the  business  life  of  the  community,  while  his  social  qualities  and  high  per- 
sonal worth  have  made  for  popularity  among  all  whom  he  meets  in  social  connec- 
tions. 


JAMES   P.   O'BRIEN. 


In  thoroughness  and  a  mastery  of  every  detail  of  the  duties  that  have  devolved 
upon  him  lies  the  secret^  of  the  success  which  has  brought  James  P.  O'Brien  to  the 
eminent  position  which  he  occupies  in  railway  circles  of  the  northwest,  as  general 
manager  of  the  Oregon-Washington  Railroad  &  Navigation  Company.  The  history 
of  such  a  man  should  ever  be  a  stimulus  to  honest  endeavor,  close  application  and 
initiative  effort.  As  the  architect  of  his  own  fortune  he  has  builded  wisely  and  well, 
and  at  the  same  time  his  labors  have  been  a  valuable  asset  in  the  development  of  the 
resources  of  the  northwest  through  his  connection  with  transportation  interests,  with- 
out which  commercial  and  industrial  interests  are  blocked  and  progress  brought  to 
a  standstill.  Mr.  O'Brien  was  born  in  Winsted,  Connecticut,  April  26,  1862,  and  as 
the  name  indicates,  is  of  Irish  lineage. 

Reared  in  the  state  of  his  nativity,  James  P.  O'Brien  pursued  his  education  in 
the  Christian  Brothers  School  and  in  the  public  schools  of  Winsted  and  when  it 
became  necessary  for  him  to  enter  business  life  and  provide  his  own  support,  he 
turned  his  attention  toward  railroading,  securing  a  position  as  trucker  at  the  Winsted 
station.  Actuated  at  all  times  by  laudable  ambition,  he  bent  every  energy  to  the 
accomplishment  of  the  tasks  assigned  him  and  his  faithfulness  and  ability  naturally 
won  him  promotion.  He  left  Winsted  to  become  chief  dispatcher  of  the  Connecticut 
Western  Railroad  at  Hartford,  Connecticut,  and  took  a  further  advanced  step  when, 
in  1889,  he  removed  to  St.  Joseph,  Missouri,  to  become  general  agent  and  later  super- 
intendent and  purchasing  agent  of  the  St.  Joseph  Terminal  Company.  The  ability 
which  he  displayed  in  the  conduct  of  the  duties  which  devolved  upon  him  led  to  his 
selection  in  1890  for  the  position  of  master  of  transportation  of  the  St.  Joseph  and 
Grand  Island  Railroad.  Later  he  came  to  Oregon  to  assume  the  position  of  assistant 
superintendent  of  the  Oregon  Railway  &  Navigation  Company  at  La  Grande.  The 
steps  in  his  orderly  progression  are  easily  discernible.  He  was  next  chief  clerk  in 
the  office  of  the  general  superintendent  of  the  same  company,  occupying  that  position 
until  October,  1892,  when  the  proffered  position  of  assistant  superintendent  of  the 
Iowa  Central  Railway  caused  him  to  remove  to  Marshalltown,  Iowa.  The  value  of  his 
service  was  recognized  by  the  officials  of  that  road  and  in  December,  1892,  he  was 
made  superintendent  in  charge  of  transportation,  with  headquarters  at  Marshalltown. 
Further  promotion  made  him  general  superintendent  of  the  same  company  in  1894, 
but  during  his  residence  in  the  northwest  he  had  become  strongly  attached  to  this 
section  of  the  country  and  in  July  of  that  year  he  availed  himself  of  the  opportunity 
to  accept  a  position  of  greater  importance  with  the  Oregon  Railway  &  Navigation 
Company,  with  offices  in  Portland.  Ten  years  later  he  was  promoted  to  the  general 
superintendency  of  the  Oregon  Railroad  &  Navigation  Company  and  the  Southern 
Pacific  Lines  in  Oregon,  and  shortly  thereafter  was  named  general  manager  of  said 
roads,  retaining  jurisdiction  over  the  latter  until  separation  of  the  Southern  Pacific 
from  the  Union  Pacific.  During  the  period  of  the  World  war  as  federal  manager  for 
the  United  States  Railroad  Administration,  he  had  charge  of  a  number  of  railroads 
in  the  northwest.  His  present  position  as  general  manager  of  the  Oregon-Washington 
Railroad  &  Navigation  Company  also   makes   him  an  official   of   its   various   subsidiary 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  227 

companies,  so  that  he  is  now  president  and  director  of  the  Camas  Prairie  Railroad 
Company  and  the  Northern  Pacific  Terminal  Company  of  Oregon;  also  a  director  of 
the  Oregon-Washington  Railroad  &  Navigation  Company  and  trustee  of  the  Spokane 
Union  Depot  and  East  Portland  Freight  Terminal.  He  is  also  vice  president  and 
director  of  The  San  Francisco  and  Portland  Steamship  Company.  It  is  a  noteworthy 
fact,  moreover,  that  Mr.  O'Brien  has  the  unqualified  support  not  only  of  his  fellow 
officials  of  the  road  but  also  of  its  employes,  who  entertain  for  him  the  highest 
regard,  respect  and   confidence. 

His  life  work  has  indeed  proven  his  worth  in  his  advancement  as  the  direct  result 
of  earnest  effort,  close  application  and  indefatigable  industry — qualities  that  may  be 
cultivated  by  all.  He  has  at  all  times  placed  business  duties  first,  bending  every 
energy  to  the  accomplishment  of  a  given  task,  and,  thus  qualifying  for  a  position  of 
larger  responsibility. 

On  the  16th  of  October,  1888,  Mr.  O'Brien  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Anna 
Louise  Ryan  of  Winsted,  Connecticut,  and  to  them  has  been  born  a  daughter,  Lillian 
Crowe,  who  is  now  the  wife  of  Coe  A.  McKenna  of  Portland. 

Mr.  O'Brien's  social  position  is  indicated  in  his  membership  in  the  leading  clubs 
of  Portland,  including  the  Arlington  and  Waverly,  and  he  is  also  an  active  member 
of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  He  is  likewise  identified  with  the  Knights  of  Columbus 
and  is  a  member  of  the  Catholic  church.  He  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the 
republican  party  and  is  thoroughly  informed  concerning  the  significant  problems  which 
engage  the  attention  of  statesmen  and  thinking  men  throughout  the  country.  Since 
1894  he  has  resided  in  Portland.  His  lite,  in  its  steady  and  continuous  progress, 
exemplifies  the  spirit  of  the  northwest  in  its  wonderful  development  and  advancement. 
There  has  been  no  miracle  connected  with  the  latter  and  the  former  is  no  matter  of 
marvel.  In  each  instance  it  has  been  the  utilization  of  the  opportunities  which  nature 
has  provided.  Mr.  O'Brien  has  employed  his  innate  talents  and  powers  in  the  mastery 
of  those  duties  which  have  devolved  upon  him  and  the  problems  which  have  arisen. 
Each  forward  step  has  brought  him  a  broader  outlook  and  wider  opportunities  and 
he  has  ever  been  found  equal  to  the  task,  his  initiative  spirit  enabling  him  to  carve 
out  a  path  to  success. 


ALPHONSO  JAY  DEMING. 


Alphonso  Jay  Deming,  a  leader  among  the  merchants  of  St.  Helens,  where  he  is 
the  owner  of  two  drug  stores,  was  bom  in  Independence,  Oregon,  in  1873,  the  son 
of  Alphonso  and  Mary  (Moran)  Deming.  The  Demings  are  descendants  of  an  old 
New  York  family,  and  the  grandfather  and  father  of  Alphonso  Jay  Deming  served 
in  the  Civil  war.  His  grandfather  moved  to  Oregon  after  the  war  and  settled  at 
Independence,  where  he  remained  until  his  death.  The  Moran  family  were  pioneers 
of  the  '60s.  Mrs.  Mary  A.  Stine,  the  mother  of  our  subject,  is  still  living,  residing 
in  the  city  of  Monmouth,  Oregon. 

Alphonso  Jay  Deming  was  educated  in  the  grade  schools  of  his  native  district 
and  located  in  St.  Helens  in  1890,  where  he  was  employed  as  a  clerk  in  a  pharmacy 
for  some  years.  He  became  an  expert  pharmacist  and  bought  out  a  drug  business 
in  1900.  For  the  past  twenty  years  Mr.  Deming  has  been  an  important  factor  in  the 
commercial  life  of  St.  Helens,  where  he  operates  two  drug  stores,  one  on  the  corner 
of  Strand  and  Cowlitz  streets  and  the  other  on  Plaza  street.  He  carries  the  Rexall 
line  of  drugs  and  druggists  sundries  and  is  one  of  the  important  representatives  of 
the  large  "Rexall   family." 

In  1894  Mr.  Deming  was  married  to  Miss  Lena  Blakesley,  a  native  of  Oregon 
and  a  member  of  a  representative  pioneer  family.  They  are  the  parents  of  three 
children:  Oswald,  the  eldest,  is  a  graduate  of  the  North  Pacific  College  of  Pharmacy, 
Portland,  and  is  a  licensed  pharmacist.  He  is  the  manager  of  the  Plaza  drug  store 
at  St.  Helens  and  is  accounted  one  of  the  sterling  young  business  men  of  that  place. 
He  was  a  volunteer  in  the  World  war  and  was  in  the  hospital  service  until  the  signing 
of  the  armistice.  The  daughter  of  the  family  is  Mary  Eugenia;  another  son.  Max 
John,  is  a  graduate  of  the  North  Pacific  College  of  Pharmacy,  and  is  now  associated 
with  his  father   in  the   conduct   of  the   Rexall   drug  store. 

Mr.  Deming  is  a  member  of  the  St.  Helens  Commercial  Club  and  is  prominent 
in  all   public  affairs.     His  activity   in   the   war  drives   and   Red   Cross   work   was   only 


228  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

exceeded  by  his  service  as  enrolling  officer.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias, 
having  filled  all  of  the  chairs  in  that  order,  and  also  has  membership  in  the  State 
Pharmaceutical  Association.  Mr.  Deming  is  a  prominent  man  in  St.  Helens,  where 
his  business  ability  has  brought  him  to  the  front,  and  his  position  is  now  one  of 
leadership  in  commercial  circles  of  Columbia   county. 


HON.  PERRY  O.  POWELL. 


Hon.  Perry  O.  Powell,  representing  his  district  in  the  state  legislature, 
to  that  class  of  farmers  in  Polk  county  whose  experience  and  knowledge  of  agriculture 
have  been  directed  to  a  special  branch  of  the  Industry  and  whose  intelligence  and 
skill,  controlled  by  keen  discernment  and  sound  judgment,  are  making  their  private 
enterprises  public  assets.  A  representative  of  one  of  the  honored  pioneer  families 
of  the  state,  Mr.  Powell  was  born  in  Linn  county  in  August,  1863,  and  is  a  son  of 
Franklin  S.  and  Louisa  J.  Powell,  prominent  and  highly  respected  residents  of  Mon- 
mouth, extended  mention  of  whom  is  made  in  connection  with  the  sketch  of  Dr.  J. 
M.  Powell,  which  appears  elsewhere   in  this  work. 

In  the  public  schools  of  Monmouth,  Perry  0.  Powell  pursued  his  education,  later 
becoming  a  student  in  Christian  College,  now  the  State  Normal  School,  from  which 
he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1884.  He  then  entered  the  Transylvania  Uni- 
versity at  Lexington,  Kentucky,  and  was  graduated  therefrom  in  1SS7,  after  which 
he  pursued  a  course  of  study  in  Yale  College,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the 
class  of  1890.  Thus  liberally  qualified  for  life's  practical  duties  and  responsibilities, 
he  took  up  the  profession  of  teaching,  which  he  successfully  followed  for  a  period 
of  fifteen  years  in  Missouri  and  Iowa,  and  for  seven  years  was  an  instructor  in  the 
State  Normal  School  at  Monmouth,  becoming  well  known  as  an  able  educator.  He 
then  turned  his  attention  to  agricultural  pursuits,  cultivating  a  portion  of  the  old 
home  place,  which  after  his  father's  demise  was  divided  among  the  children.  He 
operates  a  farm  of  two  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  of  which  thirteen  acres  are  devoted 
to  the  cultivation  of  prunes,  and  he  also  has  a  herd  of  registered  Jersey  cattle  and 
is  engaged  in  raising  pure  bred  Duroc-Jersey  hogs,  being  very  successful  as  a  stock 
raiser.  He  is  interested  in  all  modern  developments  along  agricultural  lines  and  has 
equipped  his  farm  with  the  most  approved  labor-saving  machinery.  He  believes  in 
scientific  methods  and  keeps  abreast  of  the  times  in  every  way.  He  is  much  inter- 
ested in  dairying,  which  is  rapidly  becoming  an  important  industry  in  Oregon,  and 
modernly  equipped  and  sanitary  establishments  of  this  kind  are  making  Polk  county 
a  valuable  factor  in  the  resources  of  the  state.  He  is  a  director  of  the  Oregon  Dairy 
Council,  an  organization  for  the  promotion  of  the  dairy  industry  in  the  state,  and  was 
one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Polk  County  Fair  Association.  He  served  as  president 
of  the  latter  organization  for  one  term  and  has  served  continuously  as  a  director. 
He  is  president  of  the  Polk  County  Farm  Bureau,  which  he  was  instrumental  in 
organizing:  is  secretary  of  the  State  Farm  Bureau;  and  is  one  of  the  most  promi- 
nent and  progressive  agriculturists  of  the  state.  As  state  secretary  he  was  placed 
in  charge  of  headquarters  of  the  State  Farm  Bureau,  in  April,  1921,  with  offices  in 
Portland.  He  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Monmouth  Cooperative  Creamery  Company  and 
the  Capital  City  Cooperative  Creamery  of  Salem  and  he  has  been  most  successful 
in  the  management  of  his  business  interests,  being  regarded  as  an  authority  on  all 
matters  pertaining  to  agricultural  development  along  scientific  lines  in  his  part  of 
the  state. 

In  October,  1891,  Mr.  Powell  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Margaret  E.  Quisen- 
berry,  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  five  children,  namely:  Lydia,  who  is 
a  graduate  of  the  Oregon  Agricultural  College  and  is  now  the  wife  of  P.  G.  Car- 
michael  of  Lexington,  Oregon:  Frank  B.,  also  a  graduate  of  the  State  Agricultural 
College  and  now  engaged  in  the  cattle  business  in  partnership  with  his  father;  Wilmer 
D.,  who  was  also  graduated  from  the  State  Agricultural  College  and  is  residing  at 
home;  and  Perry  N.  and  Freda,  both  of  whom  are  students  at  that  college.  The  son, 
"Wilmer  D..  enlisted  for  service  in  the  World  war  and  was  sent  to  the  officers'  training 
camp  at  Camp  Taylor,  Kentucky.  He  was  commissioned  second  lieutenant  and  was 
stationed  at  Fort   Sill.   Oklahoma. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Powell  is  a  stalwart  republican  and  in  November,  1920, 
he  was  elected  a  representative  to  the   state  legislature  from   Polk   county,  where  he 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  231 

is  making  a  most  creditable  record,  giving  earnest  and  thoughtful  consideration  to 
all  the  vital  questions  which  come  up  for  settlement  and  supporting  all  bills  which 
he  believes  to  be  of  benefit  to  the  public  at  large.  He  also  served  as  mayor  of  Mon- 
mouth for  two  years,  giving  to  the  city  a  businesslike  and  progressive  administra- 
tion. He  is  a  member  of  the  Farmers  Union  and  the  Polk  County  Grange,  and  of 
the  last  named  organization  has  served  as  master  for  the  past  six  years.  His  religious 
faith  is  indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  Christian  church  and  his  life  has  ever 
been  guided  by  its  teachings.  His  career  has  been  marked  by  steady  advancement, 
due  to  his  close  application,  his  study  of  the  business  to  which  he  has  turned  his 
attention  and  his  unremitting  energy  and  reliability.  He  is  interested  in  all  that 
has  to  do  with  public  progress  in  the  community  and  state  and  the  uplift  of  the 
individual,  and  his  aid  and  influence  are  always  on  the  side  of  advancement  and 
improvement.  His  entire  life,  with  the  exception  of  fifteen  years  spent  in  teaching 
in  the  east,  has  been  passed  in  Oregon  and  his  career  has  ever  been  such  as  has 
reflected   credit   and   honor   upon   the   state. 


CHARLES  EDWARD  SITTON. 

Charles  Edward  Sitton,  who  for  many  years  figured  in  mercantile  circles  of  Port- 
land, being  proprietor  of  one  of  the  leading  drug  stores  of  the  city,  was  born  near 
McMinnville,  Oregon,  in  1848,  his  parents  being  Nathan  K.  and  Priscilla  (Rogers) 
Sitton,  the  former  a  native  of  Missouri  and  the  latter  of  Indiana.  Nathan  K.  Sitton 
came  to  Oregon  in  1843,  settling  first  in  Yamhill  county  where  he  secured  a  donation 
claim  and  his  wife  also  took  up  a  claim  of  equal  size — three  hundred  and  twenty 
acres.  Thereon  they  spent  the  remainder  of  their  days,  being  numbered  among  the 
worthy  pioneers  and  substantial  citizens  of  the  state.  They  are  mentioned  at  length 
on  another  page  of  this  work.  To  Nathan  K.  and  Priscilla  Sitton  were  born  nine 
children  and  after  the  death  of  his  first  wife  Mr.  Sitton  wedded  Mary  Laughlin  and 
five  children  were  born  of  that  marriage. 

Charles  E.  Sitton  was  the  eldest  child  of  the  first  marriage.  He  acquired  his 
early  education  in  the  district  schools  and  continued  his  studies  in  Willamette  Uni- 
versity. After  completing  his  course  he  traveled  through  the  east  and  about  1869 
entered  the  drug  store  of  S.  G.  Skidmore,  under  whose  direction  he  thoroughly  ac- 
quainted himself  with  the  business  and  eventually  was  admitted  to  a  partnership.  The 
firm  existed  for  several  years  and  later  Mr.  Sitton  became  sole  proprietor,  successfully 
conducting  the  business  up  to  the  time  of  his  death.  He  maintained  one  of  the  fine 
drug  establishments  of  the  city  and  was  accounted  one  of  the  progressive  merchants 
of  Portland. 

Mr.  Sitton  was  twice  married.  In  1872  he  married  Ada  Skidmore  but  her  death 
occurred  in  1873.  His  second  wife  was  Miss  Lefie  W.  Spaulding,  a  daughter  of  Shere- 
bials  and  Lurena  (Shedd)  Spaulding,  who  were  natives  of  Massachusetts.  Mrs.  Sitton 
has  two  adopted  daughters,  nieces  of  Mr.  Sitton:  Katharine,  who  is  the  wife  of  Law- 
rence S.  Ainsworth,  a  son  of  Captain  George  Ainsworth  and  grandson  of  one  of  Port- 
land's pioneers,  Captain  J.  C.  Ainsworth;  and  Lucy  G.,  who  is  the  wife  of  George  K. 
Wentworth,  Jr.,  of  Portland. 

Mr.  Sitton  was  identified  with  the  public  interests  of  his  city,  contributing  in 
various  ways  to  the  general  good.  He  acted  as  a  trustee  of  the  public  library,  was  a 
Mason  of  high  rank,  being  identified  with  the  Knights  Templar  Commandery  and  the 
Scottish  Rite  bodies  and  at  one  time  was  grand  master  of  the  Independent  Order  of 
Odd  Fellows.  He  was  also  very  prominent  in  club  circles  and  his  social  qualities 
everywhere  made  him  a  favorite.  He  was  a  democrat  but  liberal  in  his  views  and  his 
religious  faith  was  that  of  the  Unitarian  church,  in  which  he  was  at  one  time  a 
trustee.  He  passed  away  in  1890,  his  death  being  the  occasion  of  deep  regret  to  many 
friends  whose  high  regard  he  had  won  through  business  or  social  relations. 

Mrs.  Sitton  has  been  prominent  not  only  in  the  social  circles  but  in  connection 
with  the  public  interests  of  Portland.  She  is  deeply  interested  in  civic  matters  and 
questions  relating  to  the  general  welfare  and  tor  ten  years  was  a  member  of  the  board 
of  education,  being  the  only  lady  ever  elected  to  the  board.  She  had  taught  for  several 
years  and  was  a  most  capable  educator,  imparting  clearly  and  readily  to  others  the 
knowledge  she  had  acquired.  When  she  was  first  a  candidate  for  the  board  she  had 
great  opposition,  but  so  excellent  was  her  record  and  so  efficient  her  work  in  behalf 
of  the  public  schools  that  she  had  no  opposition   for  her  second  term.     She   has  also 


232  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

been  largely  and  most  helpfully  associated  with  the  charitable  institutions  and  has 
done  great  good  along  these  lines.  She  was  president  of  the  Waverly  Baby  Home 
for  twenty  years  and  a  member  of  the  board  for  several  additional  years.  She  has 
served  on  other  boards,  and  there  are  few  organized  benevolences  which  have  not 
received  her  assistance,  while  her  private  charities  are  many.  A  recognition  of  the 
brotherhood  of  mankind  causes  her  continuously  to  extend  a  helping  hand  where  aid 
is  needed  and  her  good  works  are  indeed  many. 


ERNEST  EUGENE  MERGES. 

Ernest  Eugene  Herges,  a  capitalist  of  Portland,  whose  invested  interests  connect 
him  with  many  important  corporations,  was  born  in  Olympia,  Washington,  December 
27,  1873.  His  father,  Nicholas  Charles  Merges,  was  born  in  Germany  in  1843.  and 
came  to  the  United  States  with  his  widowed  mother  in  1853,  settling  in  Oshkosh, 
Wisconsin.  He  was  an  expert  sculptor  in  marble  and  his  professional  interests  took 
him  into  various  sections  of  the  country.  As  he  traveled  he  met  in  Virginia  the  lady 
whom  he  later  made  his  wife.  This  was  Miss  Fannie  Marseil,  then  eighteen  years  of 
age,  a  daughter  of  Major  Marseil  of  the  French  army,  whose  father  had  served  with 
the  rank  of  major  on  the  staff  of  Napoleon. 

When  a  lad  of  six  years  Ernest  E.  Merges  was  brought  to  Portland,  where  he 
was  reared  and  attended  the  public  schools.  He  later  entered  the  Pacific  University 
of  Forest  Grove,  Washington  county,  Oregon,  and  was  graduated  therefrom  in  1892. 
In  1894  he  completed  a  course  in  the  law  department  of  the  University  of  Oregon  and 
although  the  main  part  of  the  institution  was  at  Eugene,  Oregon,  the  law  department 
was  then  in  Portland.  Mr.  Merges  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1894  and  entered  upon 
the  active  work  of  the  profession  in  the  Rose  City,  giving  his  attention  to  his  practice 
until  1905,  since  which  time  private  interests  have  claimed  his  time  and  energies. 
He  has  become  identified  with  many  corporations  and  the  supervision  of  his  invested 
interests  makes  full  demand   upon  his  energies. 

On  the  9th  of  June,  1905,  in  the  city  which  is  still  his  home,  Mr.  Merges  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Mary  E.  Edwards,  a  daughter  of  the  late  H.  E.  Edwards,  a  pioneer  furniture 
dealer  of  Portland.  To  this  marriage  has  been  born  a  son,  Edward  E.  Eugene,  whose 
birth  occurred  October  23,  1909.  His  father  has  raised  him  from  childhood  as  an 
outdoor  sportsman — hunting,  fishing,  horseback  riding,  swimming,  and  in  fact  all  the 
outdoor  sports.  He  is  the  youngest  game  warden  in  the  United  States — this  boy 
thirteen  years  of  age.  Mr.  Merges  is  well  known  in  the  club  circles  of  the  city, 
belonging  to  the  Multnomah  and  other  leading  social  organizations.  His  political 
endorsement  is  given  to  the  republican  party.  During  the  war  period  he  was  con- 
tinuously active  in  support  of  interests  having  to  do  with  the  government  and  its 
relation  to  the  allied  forces,  many  of  his  missions  being  of  a  secret  character.  His 
entire  life  has  been  passed  in  the  northwest  and  he  has  ever  been  imbued  with  the 
spirit  of  advancement  and  progress  which  has  been  the  dominant  element  in  the 
upbuilding  of  this  section  of  the  country.  He  has  studied  its  history,  has  acquainted 
himself  with  its  opportunities  and  natural  resources  and  has  so  placed  his  investments 
that  he  is  now  deriving  therefrom  a  substantial  annual  return,  while  his  business 
interests,  too,  are  of  a  character  that  contribute  to  public  prosperity  as  well  as  to 
individual  success. 


CARL   ARVID   NYQUIST. 


Carl  Arvid  Nyquist  is  prominent  in  the  business  circles  of  Astoria  as  president 
and  manager  of  the  Nyquist  Motor  Car  Company,  which  company  was  incorporated 
by  him  in  March,  1919.  He  is  a  native  of'  Sweden,  where  his  birth  occurred  on  the 
15th  of  August,  1892,  a  son  of  Gustav  and  Anna  (Olsen)  Nyquist.  His  father  was 
a  prosperous  farmer  and  died  in  Sweden  in  1913. 

Carl  A.  Nyquist  received  his  education  in  his  native  country  and  came  to  America 
in  December,  1913,  landing  in  Boston,  Massachusetts.  He  immediately  started  for  the 
Pacific  coast  and  spent  the  next  ten  months  at  The  Dalles,  Oregon,  as  a  guest  of  his 
uncle,  a  farmer  of  that  section,  who  was  his  father's  twin  brother.     During  the  period 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  233 

he  spent  there  he  assiduously  applied  himself  to  the  study  of  English  and  took  out 
his  first  naturalization  papers.  He  then  became  a  student  at  an  automobile  school 
and  after  mastering  that  line  of  business  bought  a  car  and  operated  it  for  hire.  He 
traveled  all  over  the  state  of  Oregon  looking  for  a  suitable  location  in  which  to  estab- 
lish a  business  and  finally  fixed  upon  Astoria.  He  located  there  and  was  doing  a  fine 
business  as  distributor  of  the  Velie  motor  cars  at  the  outbreak  of  the  World  war. 
Fired  with  the  desire  to  help  his  new  country  he  closed  up  his  business  and  in  the 
early  days  of  the  war  entered  the  army  and  was  sent  to  Camp  Lewis,  Washington. 
He  was  assigned  to  the  Thirteenth  Ammunition  Train,  with  which  he  served  until 
January,  1919,  when  he  received  his  honorable  discharge.  Mr.  Nyquist  is  especially 
proud  of  the  fact  that  his  final  citizenship  papers  were  given  him  while  he  was  serving 
in  the  army.  Upon  being  demobilized  he  returned  to  Astoria,  resumed  his  business 
and  in  March,  1919,  incorporated  the  Nyquist  Motor  Car  Company,  being  elected  its 
president  and  manager.  With  him  in  this  business  are  two  young  men  whom  he  met 
while  serving  in  the  army  and  who  became  his  "buddies."  After  his  return  home 
he  offered  his  two  "buddies"  positions  in  his  corporation  and  one  of  them,  Ellis  O. 
Link,  is  now  the  assistant  manager  of  the  company,  while  his  brother  is  an  expert 
mechanic  in  the  repair  shop.  Among  the  eleven  employes  of  the  company  half  of 
them  are  members  of  the  American  Legion.  The  company  is  distributor  for  the 
Velie,  Chevrolet,  Peerless  and  Allen  cars  and  the  show-room,  which  is  located  on  the 
corner  of  Sixteenth  and  Commercial  streets,  has  a  commanding  frontage  on  both 
streets.  Here  also  is  located  the  accessory  department  and  the  general  oflBce.  In 
addition  the  company  also  maintains  a  repair  shop  and  service  station  on  Seventeenth 
street  between  Commercial  and  Duane  streets. 

In  1918  Mr.  Nyquist  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ruth  Hannah  Soberstrom,  a 
native  of  Wisconsin,  and  they  have  become  parents  of  a  daughter;     Ethna  Irene. 

Mr.  Nyquist  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  democratic  party,  in  the  interests 
of  which  he  takes  an  active  part.  He  is  fraternally  active  in  the  Masons,  Odd  Fellows, 
and  Woodmen  of  the  World  and  he  is  a  prominent  member  of  the  American  Legion, 
being  one  of  the  executive  committee  of  the  Clatsop  Post,  No.  12.  He  is  an  enthusi- 
astic member  of  the  Kiwanis  Club  and  holds  the  office  of  district  trustee.  He  holds 
membership  in  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  in  line  with  his  business  is  a  member 
of  the  Oregon  Automobile  Dealers'  Association.  While  Mr.  Nyquist  is  one  of  the  most 
active  citizens  of  Astoria  in  all  public  affairs,  he  acknowledges  that  he  has  but  three 
fads — his  family,  the  American  Legion  and  the  Kiwanis  Club.  He  has  risen  to  his 
present  position  solely  through  his  own  diligence  and  industry  and  his  success  in  busi- 
ness is  in  every  way  deserved. 


JOHN  STONE  BRADLEY. 


An  analyzation  of  the  life  record  of  John  Stone  Bradley  brings  to  light  the  fact 
that  no  unusual  circumstances  have  played  a  part  in  the  attainment  of  his  present 
position  of  distinction  as  vice  president  of  the  Bradley  Logging  Company  and  a  promi- 
nent representative  of  the  lumber  interests  of  the  northwest.  Not  by  leaps  and  bounds 
but  by  steady  progression  has  he  reached  the  position  which  he  now  occupies,  ever 
recognizing  the  fact  that  the  present  and  not  the  future  holds  his  opportunity.  More- 
over, an  understanding  of  the  Roman  maxim — "There  is  no  excellence  without  labor" — 
early  found  lodgment  in  his  mind  and  therefore  upon  close  application  and  thorough 
mastery  of  every  task  and  preparation  for  duties  of  larger  responsibility  rests  his 
success.  He  has  developed  power  of  organizing  that  enables  him  to  coordinate  forces 
into  a  harmonious  whole  and  his  initiative  spirit  allows  him  readily  to  solve  intricate 
problems.  Theodore  Roosevelt  said:  "The  strongest  and  best  type  of  American  citi- 
zenship is  found  in  the  man  of  eastern  birth  and  training  who  has  sought  the  oppor- 
tunities of  the  west."  Such  is  the  record  of  Mr.  Bradley,  who  was  born  in  Lee,  Massa- 
chusetts, September  1,  1842,  his  parents  being  Eli  and  Amanda  B.  Bradley,  who  were 
farming  people.  His  grandfather  was  Eli  Bradley,  Sr.,  and  his  great-grandfather, 
Jesse  Bradley,  who  commanded  a  company  of  Massachusetts  troops  in  the  Revolutionary 
war  with  the  rank  of  captain. 

After  attending  the  public  schools  John  Stone  Bradley  continued  his  education 
in  Union  College  at  Schenectady,  New  York.  He  pursued  the  scientific  course  as  a 
member  of  the  class  of  1864,  but  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war  caused  him  to  put  all 


234  HISTORY  OP  OREGON 

personal  interests  aside  and  in  1862  he  enlisted  at  Pittsfield,  Massachusetts,  as  a  mem- 
ber of  Company  B,  Thirty-seventh  Massachusetts  Volunteer  Infantry.  He  was  promoted 
to  first  sergeant  in  August  of  the  same  year,  was  afterward  advanced  to  the  rank  of 
second  lieutenant  and  then  to  first  lieutenant  and  later  was  made  adjutant  of  the 
Thirty-seventh  Regiment  on  the  29th  of  November,  1864.  On  the  6th  of  April,  1865, 
he  was  brevetted  captain  for  bravery  in  action  at  Petersburg  and  Little  Sailors  Creek 
and  on  the  16th  of  May  of  the  same  year  received  his  honorable  discharge.  He  had 
devoted  three  years  to  the  service  of  his  country  and  throughout  his  entire  life  has 
manifested  the  same  spirit  of  loyalty  and  fidelity  in  days  of  peace  as  in  times  of  war. 

When  the  country  no  longer  needed  his  aid  Mr.  Bradley  returned  to  Lee,  Massa- 
chusetts, in  1865,  and  there  took  up  the  business  of  paper  manufacturing.  In  1867 
he  removed  to  Bay  City,  Michigan,  where  he  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  lumber 
until  1878,  in  which  year  he  became  a  resident  of  Newark,  Ohio,  and  established  a 
lumber-yard.  For  eleven  years  he  continued  in  business  there  and  in  1889  arrived  in 
Portland,  where  he  became  a  stockholder  of  the  Bridal  Veil  Lumber  Company  at  Bridal 
Veil,  Oregon,  and  assumed  the  position  of  manager.  Since  that  time  he  has  figured 
prominently  in  connection  with  the  lumber  interests  of  the  northwest.  For  eighteen 
years  he  continued  as  manager  of  the  Bridal  Veil  Lumber  Company  but  severed  his 
connection  therewith  in  1907,  and  became  a  stockholder  and  the  manager  of  the 
Bradley  Logging  Company,  with  main  office  in  Portland,  while  its  railroad  and  logging 
camps  are  at  Cathlamet,  Washington.  Since  that  time  Mr.  Bradley  has  devoted  his 
energies  to  the  expansion  and  development  of  the  business  and  his  long  experience  in 
connection  with  the  lumber  trade,  covering  more  than  a  half  century,  well  qualifies 
him  for  the  successful  control  of  the  interests  under  his  direction.  He  is  the  vice 
president  of  the  company  and  still  gives  supervision  to  the  business,  although  he  has 
passed  the  seventy-eighth  milestone  on  life's  journey.  His  has  been  an  extremely 
busy,  active  and  useful  life  and  he  has  made  valuable  contribution  to  the  development 
of  the  lumber  trade  of  the  northwest. 

In  December,  1866,  Mr.  Bradley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Lucy  J.  Sturges, 
the  wedding  being  celebrated  at  Lee,  Massachusetts.  Mrs.  Bradley  passed  away  August 
20,  1883.  The  two  surviving  children  of  this  marriage  are:  Harry  Lee.  who  was 
born  May  28,  1874,  at  Bay  City,  Michigan;  and  Alice  Elizabeth,  the  wife  of  Willis  G. 
Newmyer.  On  the  21st  of  January,  1885,  in  Aurora,  Illinois,  Mr.  Bradley  wedded 
Louise  Glover.  The  religious  faith  of  Mr.  Bradley  is  indicated  by  his  connection  with 
the  First  Presbyterian  church.  His  political  allegiance  has  been  given  to  the  repub- 
lican party  since  its  organization  and  he  has  been  unfaltering  in  his  support  of  its 
principles.  He  belongs  to  the  Delta  Kappa  Epsilon  fraternity  and  is  a  companion  of 
the  Military  Order  of  the  Loyal  Legion  and  past  commander  of  the  Oregon  Commandery. 
In  1883  he  became  a  member  of  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic  and  in  1308  of  the 
Sons  of  the  American  Revolution.  He  is  a  Master  Mason  and  Knight  Templar,  hav- 
ing become  identified  with  the  order  in  1865,  so  that  through  fifty-five  years  he  has 
been  an  exemplary  representative  of  the  craft.  He  also  belongs  to  the  University 
Club  and  to  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.  During  the  war  period  he  served  on  a  special 
committee  to  look  after  the  soldiers  and  did  everything  in  his  power  to  further  America's 
interests.  His  life  has  ever  been  guided  by  high  and  honorable  principles  and  has 
constituted  the  expression  of  worthy  purposes.  All  who  know  him/  bear  testimony  to 
his  sterling  traits  of  character  and  honor  him  not  alone  by  reason  of  what  he  has 
accomplished  but  by  reason  of  the  straightforward  methods  which  he  has  ever  fol- 
lowed in  every  relation.  His  example  is  indeed  one  worthy  of  emulation  and  Portland 
has  reason  to  be  proud  to  number  him  among  her  citizens. 


DAVID   TAYLOR. 


David  Taylor,  deceased,  was  for  many  years  a  prominent  citizen  of  Pendleton 
and  Umatilla  county.  He  was  well  known  in  both  agricultural  and  political  circles 
and  in  his  passing  the   county  lost  a   representative   citizen. 

David  Taylor  was  born  in  Indiana,  on  the  9th  of  October,  1840,  a  son  of  Samuel 
and  Nancy  (Phipps)  Taylor.  Both  parents  were  natives  of  Russell  county,  Virginia, 
the  former  born  there  in  1808.  The  marriage  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Taylor  took  place 
there  in  January,  1829,  and  soon  after  they  removed  to  Russell  county,  Indiana,  and 
subsequently    to   near    Terre   Haute,    where    their    children    were    educated.     Later    Mr. 


DAVID   TAYLOR 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  237 

and  Mrs.  Taylor  and  family  removed  to  Mercer  county,  Illinois,  and  in  1852  came 
west  by  ox  team  over  the  old  Oregon  Trail.  While  on  this  Journey  the  members  of 
the  wagon  train  were  held  up  by  a  number  of  Indians,  who  laid  their  blankets  on 
the  trail  and  demanded  the  surrender  of  all  valuables  before  permitting  the  settlers 
to  go  their  way.  They  were  followed  by  Indians  for  the  greater  part  of  the  journey 
and  on  leaving  what  is  now  Pendleton  they  changed  their  route  of  travel,  going 
down  the  Umatilla  river  instead  of  taking  the  highland  route.  In  this  way  they 
avoided  the  Indians  and  saved  themselves  from  possible  massacre.  Samuel  Taylor 
died  on  this  overland  journey,  leaving  his  widow  and  children  to  complete  the  trip 
alone.  Two  daughters  and  one  son  also  died  on  the  plains.  The  survivors  bravely  con- 
tinued on  their  way  and  on  arriving  in  Oregon,  settled  in  Portland  for  the  winter. 
Mrs.  Taylor  then  took  her  little  family  to  Olympia,  Washington,  where  she  ran 
a  boarding  house  for  some  time  and  in  1855  removed  to  California,  where  she  and 
an  older  daughter  established  a  boarding  house,  which  they  ran  successfully  until 
the  death  of  the  mother,  which  occurred  there.  Members  of  the  Taylor  family  were 
originally  from  Virginia,  in  which  state  they  were  recognized  as  prominent  and 
progressive   citizens. 

The  boyhood  of  David  Taylor  was  spent  in  California,  and  at  Salem,  Oregon,  and 
he  received  such  education  as  the  times  afforded.  When  a  young  man  he  removed 
to  the  Willamette  valley  and  in  1865  was  united  in  marriage  and  engaged  in  farm- 
ing in  the  valley  until  1869,  when  he  removed  to  near  Athena,  Umatilla  county,  on 
Wild  Horse  creek  and  bought  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  farm  land.  He  im- 
proved this  land,  built  a  substantial  log  house  and  resided  here  for  a  period  of  six 
years.  He  then  took  up  another  ranch  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  just  three 
miles  north,  and  to  this  tract  he  added  from  time  to  time  until  he  had  over  three 
hundred  acres  of  well  improved  farm  land.  In  1889  he  decided  to  retire  from  active 
farm  life  and  moved  into  Athena  and  entered  into  business.  He  bought  up  some 
grain  and  operated  a  chain  of  warehouses,  handling  the  grain  for  the  Gifford  Com- 
pany, the  Collins  Company  and  others.  For  two  years  he  served  as  assessor  of  Umatilla 
county  and  his  popularity  was  made  manifest  in  his  election  to  the  mayoralty  of 
Athena.  He  was  also  deputy  sheriff  for  a  number  of  years.  His  death  occurred 
on  the  29th  of  March,  1920,  and  was  an  occasion  of  deep  grief  to  his  many  friends 
throughout  the  community.  He  was  seventy-nine  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  his 
demise. 

On  February  22,  1865,  Mr.  Taylor  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Sarah  A.  Gerk- 
ing,  a  daughter  of  Jonathan  and  Nancy  (Myers)  Gerking,  and  a  native  of  Clay  county, 
Indiana.  Mrs.  Taylor  is  still  living,  at  the  age  of  seventy-three,  making  her  resi- 
dence in  her  newly  built  bungalow  at  Athena.  Four  children  were  born  to  their 
union:  Tillmon  D.,  mention  of  whom  may  be  found  on  another  page  of  this  work; 
W.  R.,  who  followed  in  his  father's  footsteps  and  became  a  successful  farmer  of 
Umatilla  county.  He  is  now  residing  retired  in  Athena;  Lela  lone,  who  died  when 
four  and   one-half  years  of  age;    and  one  who  died  at  birth. 

The  fraternal  affiliation  of  Mr.  Taylor  was  with  the  Masonic  order  and  he  was 
an  exemplary  member  of  the  craft.  His  religious  faith  was  that  of  the  Christian 
church,  in  which  he  held  a  life  membership  as  deacon.  His  life  was  one  of  diligence 
and  industry  and  he  lived  to  enjoy  the  fruits  of  his  labor.  His  many  friends  recog- 
nized his  sterling  character  and  true  personal  worth  and  a  feeling  of  deep  bereave- 
ment swept  the  community  on  the  news  of  his  demise. 


GEORGE  M.  ROBERTS. 


Though  it  has  been  many  years  since  Horace  Greeley  uttered  his  well  known  ad- 
monition "Go  west,  young  man,"  the  advice  is  still  being  followed  and  throughout  the 
Pacific  coast  country  and  especially  in  Oregon  the  alert  and  dynamic  young  men  of 
the  state  are  sturdy  fellows  who  have  come  west  to  embrace  the  opportunities  offered 
in  a  growing  and  rapidly  developing  country.  They  are  to  be  found  in  all  sections 
and  in  all  professions,  a  great  number  being  representatives  of  the  law.  Among  those 
who  are  conspicuous  as  progressive  and  able  lawyers  is  George  M.  Roberts  of  Jackson 
county.  He  was  born  in  Lawrenceburg,  Indiana,  in  1889,  his  parents  being  George  M. 
and  Kate  H.  (Harding)  Roberts.  The  Roberts  family  were  among  the  earliest  of  the 
pioneers  of  Indiana  and  their  lineage  is  traced  back  through  the  Roberts  and  White 


238  IIISTOKY  OF  OREGON 

families  to  the  colonial  epoch  in  American  history,  many  representatives  of  both 
families  serving  as  soldiers  in  the  war  for  independence  and  later  In  the  War  of  1812. 
The  Hardings  were  of  old  Ohio  pioneer  stock  and  are  closely  connected  with  the 
early  history  of  that  state.  George  M.  Roberts,  Sr.,  was  a  prominent  Indiana  lawyer 
and  for  many  terms  served  as  mayor  of  Lawrenceburg,  where  he  was  also  honored 
with  various  other  positions  of  public  trust. 

George  M.  Roberts  of  Medford  was  educated  in  the  graded  and  high  schools  of 
his  native  town  and  in  the  University  of  Indiana,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with 
the  Bachelor  of  Laws  degree.  Admitted  to  the  bar  of  Indiana,  the  same  year 
he  accepted  the  position  of  assistant  cashier  in  the  People's  National  Bank  at  Lawrence- 
burg and  continued  to  occupy  that  position  for  a  year.  He  then  determined  to  find  a 
broader  field  of  labor  and  started  for  the  Pacific  coast.  He  left  his  old  home  assured 
that  he  could  build  up  a  practice  in  his  home  town,  with  the  backing  of  his  father, 
but  he  was  ambitious  to  succeed  on  his  own  account  and  traveled  along  the  Pacific 
coast  from  San  Francisco  to  Seattle.  With  rare  good  judgment  he  decided  to  become 
a  resident  of  Medford  and  since  1912  has  practiced  law  here,  his  clientage  growing 
steadily,  while  a  well  earned  reputation  places  him  in  the  front  rank  among  the  able 
lawyers  of  this  part  of  the  state.  In  1916  the  public,  recognizing  in  him  an  attorney 
above  the  average  and  a  man  of  excellent  oratorical  ability,  tendered  him  the  oflSce 
of  district  attorney,  to  which  he  was  in  due  time  elected,  serving  with  satisfaction 
to  his  constituents  and  with  credit  to  himself  until  January,  1921.  He  has  accepted 
no  other  political  office,  determining  to  devote  his  attention  to  the  practice  of  his 
profession  and  at  all  times  regarding  the  pursuits  of  private  life  as  in  themselves 
abundantly  worthy  of  his  best  efforts. 

In  1912  Mr.  Roberts  was  married  to  Miss  Blanche  Early,  a  daughter  of  H.  B. 
Early,  the  president  of  the  Early  &  Daniel  Company,  grain  merchants  of  Cincinnati, 
Ohio,  with  a  national  reputation.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Roberts  now  have  two  children: 
Mary  Lee  and  Dorothy  Frances,  both  of  whom  are  pupils  in  the  Medford  schools. 
Mrs.  Roberts  is  a  graduate  of  the  Bartholomew-Clifton  College  of  Cincinnati,  and  is 
regarded  as  a  model  mother  and  a  most  gracious  hostess.  Mr.  Roberts  is  a  Knights 
Templar  Mason  and  has  crossed  the  sands  of  the  desert  to  membership  in  Hillah 
Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  at  Ashland.  He  likewise  belongs  to  the  Benevolent  Pro- 
tective Order  of  Elks,  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  still  holds  his  membership  in  the 
Phi  Kappa  Psi,  a  fraternity  of  which  he  was  president  in  his  college  days.  He  belongs 
to  the  University  Club  and  to  the  Medford  Chamber  of  Commerce.  In  politics  he 
is  an  ardent  republican,  but  prefers  to  serve  his  party  in  the  ranks  rather  than  in 
office.  In  a  word,  it  is  his  desire  to  concentrate  his  efforts  and  attention  upon  his 
professional  interests  and  duties  and  he  is  now  the  general  attorney  of  the  Medford 
National  Bank  and  of  other  large  interests. 


J.  C.  VEAZIE. 


J.  C.  Veazie,  member  of  the  firm  of  Veazie  &  Veazie,  prominent  attorneys  of  Port- 
land, is  a  representative  of  an  honored  pioneer  family  of  this  state.  His  great-grand- 
father, Felix  Scott,  was  a  native  of  Virginia  and  crossed  the  plains  to  the  Pacific  coast 
in  1845,  spending  the  winter  at  Sutter's  Fort.  He  completed  the  journey  to  Oregon 
in  the  spring  of  1846  and  settled  in  Lane  county,  where  a  number  of  his  descendants 
reside.  He  and  the  men  of  his  family  were  active  in  the  Indian  wars  and  in  many 
pioneer  enterprises,  including  the  building  of  the  McKenzie  wagon  road.  Having  en- 
gaged successfully  in  mining  in  California  he  and  several  associates  returned  to  the 
Atlantic  coast  by  sea  and  bought  a  band  of  blooded  horses  and  cattle,  with  which  they 
undertook  the  journey  across  the  plains  to  Oregon,  but  the  whole  party  was  slain  en 
route  in  the  year  1859.  The  grandfather,  John  Eakin  Lyle,  was  born  near  Knoxville, 
Tennessee,  came  to  Oregon  in  1845  and  in  the  following  year  married  Ellen  Scott, 
who  had  crossed  the  plains  with  her  father.  Felix  Scott.  John  E.  Lyle  taught  the  first 
school  in  Polk  county  and  a  monument  now  marks  the  site.  He  always  took  an  active 
interest  in  education  and  gave  a  considerable  part  of  his  donation  claim  at  Dallas 
for  the  founding  of  La  Creole  Academy,  also  aiding  in  constructing  the  first  building 
used  by  the  school.  He  died  January  22,  1872,  at  Florence,  Idaho,  while  engaged  in 
mining. 

Edmund  Fuller  Veazie,  the  father  of  the  subject  of  this  review,  was  born  November 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  239 

7,  1833,  at  Bangor,  Maine,  a  son  of  Jesse  and  Martha  (Catlin)  Veazie.  For  several 
years  he  followed  the  profession  of  teaching  and  subsequently  went  to  California,  en- 
gaging for  a  number  of  years  in  gold  mining  there  and  in  southern  Oregon.  Resuming 
his  old  occupation  of  teaching  he  had  charge  of  La  Creole  Academy  at  Dallas  and  of 
the  Jefferson  Institute  in  Linn  county.  In  1869  he  removed  to  what  is  now  Crook 
county,  Oregon,  where  he  engaged  in  stock  raising  until  his  death,  which  occurred 
by  drowning  in  the  John  Day  river  in  June,  1877.  On  the  18th  of  April,  1867,  at 
Dallas,  he  married  Harriet  Lyle,  who  was  born  in  Oregon  in  1847,  and  they  became 
the  parents  of  four  children:  Arthur  L.,  a  prominent  jurist  of  Portland;  Jesse  Clar- 
ence of  this  review;  Julia  Grace,  the  wife  of  Professor  Irving  M.  Glen  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  Oregon;  and  Edith  F.,  who  married  Edwin  R.  Bryson  of  Eugene. 

J.  C.  Veazie,  the  second  in  the  family,  was  born  in  Dallas,  Oregon,  July  30,  1871, 
and  there  attended  the  public  schools,  after  which  he  became  a  student  in  La  Creole 
Academy  and  subsequently  entered  the  University  of  Oregon,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  with  the  class  of  1891.  He  then  began  the  study  of  law  In  Portland  as  a 
member  of  the  law  school  of  the  State  University,  following  which  he  pursued  a  course 
in  the  law  school  of  Harvard  University.  In  1896  he  cime  to  Portland  and  was  ad- 
mitted to  the  bar  of  this  state,  after  which  he  enter'ed  the  employ  of  the  law  firm  of 
Cox,  Cotton,  Teal  &  Minor  and  subsequently  became  identified  with  Lewis  B.  Cox  of  Port- 
land, as  an  employe.  Following  the  death  of  Mr.  Cox  in  1900  Mr.  Veazie  formed  a  partner- 
ship with  F.  F.  Freeman  under  the  firm  style  of  Veazie  &  Freeman,  an  association 
which  was  continued  until  1906,  when  he  became  connected  with  his  brother.  In  1913 
they  were  joined  by  John  McCourt,  who  continued  with  them  until  1919,  the  firm  then 
being  known  as  Veazie,  McCourt  &  Veazie.  As  Veazie  &  Veazie  they  are  now  con- 
ducting an  extensive  law  business  In  which  they  have  been  successful  and  have  held 
to  the  highest  ethical  standards  of  the  profession. 

In  Portland,  on  the  20th  of  October,  1903,  J.  C.  Veazie  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  Minnie  P.  Cole,  daughter  of  the  late  Edwin  Cole,  a  native  of  England.  The 
two  children  of  this  union  are:  Alfred  C,  who  was  born  November  4,  1905;  and 
Marion  Lyle. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Veazie  is  a  republican.  He  is  a  life  member  of  the 
Multnomah  Amateur  Athletic  Club  and  a  member  of  the  University  Club.  During  the 
World  war  he  served  on  the  legal  advisory  board  and  also  aided  in  promoting  the 
various  bond  drives.  His  time  and  attention  are  chiefly  given  to  his  law  practice 
and  in  a  profession  demanding  keen  intellect  and  individual  merit  he  is  making  con- 
tinuous progress,  ranking  with  the  ablest  members  of  the  Portland  bar.  He  is  in- 
terested in  all  civic  matters  and  his  influence  is  always  on  the  side  of  progress  and 
improvement. 


HENRY   CUE. 


Henry  Cue,  the  present  proprietor  and  editor  of  The  Dalles  Optimist  with  which 
he  became  associated  in  1906  and  of  which  he  has  been  the  owner  since  1911,  was 
born  in  Illinois  in  1870.  He  Is  a  son  of  Walter  H.  and  Alice  (Stewart)  Cue,  the 
former  a  native  of  England,  who  came  to  America  in  1862.  On  his  arrival  in  this 
country,  Mr.  Cue  went  to  Illinois  and  located  in  Decatur,  where  he  followed  his  trade 
as  a  stone  engraver.  The  Stewarts  were  early  settlers  in  the  state  of  Missouri,  and 
the  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Cue  was  a  manufacturer  of  plows  in  that  state  for  a  number 
of  years. 

In  1876  the  Cue  family  moved  to  Missouri  from  Illinois,  and  Henry  Cue  was 
educated  in  the  schools  of  that  state.  At  an  early  age  he  learned  the  trade  of  a 
printer  and  having  mastered  its  technicalities  and  received  his  card  as  a  member  of 
the  Kansas  City  Typographical  Union,  he  started  out  to  find  a  suitable  location  for  a 
home.  In  1888  he  went  to  Denver,  Colorado,  where  he  worked  for  a  short  time  and 
then  pushed  on  to  the  coast,  arriving  in  Portland,  Oregon,  in  the  fall  of  that  year. 
He  worked  at  his  trade  on  the  Oregonian  for  about  twelve  months,  at  the  end  of  that 
period  going  to  California  and  later  to  Salt  Lake  City,  Utah.  In  1891  he  returned 
to  Oregon  and  became  connected  with  the  Liquor  Dealers  Gazette,  a  trade  publication 
emanating  from  Portland. 

In  1892  Mr.  Cue  returned  to  Missouri,  where  for  the  following  twelve  years  he 
was  foreman  of  the  mechanical  department  of  the  Sedalia  Morning  Gazette,  which  posi- 


240  HISTORY  OF  OREGOX 

tion  he  resigned  in  1904  to  become  license  supervisor  of  Sedalia,  filling  that  office 
until  1906.  On  his  retirement,  he  returned  to  Oregon,  and  in  the  same  year  came  to 
The  Dalles  to  work  for  The  Dalles  Optimist,  with  which  he  has  been  connected  ever 
since.  In  1908  he  bought  an  interest  in  the  paper,  which  in  1911  he  bought  outright, 
having  since  been  the  editor  and  proprietor.  The  Optimist,  under  llr.  Cue's  manage- 
ment, has  extended  the  scope  of  its  usefulness  and  has  a  widespread  influence  in 
central  Oregon.  A  large,  modernly  equipped  job  department  is  operated  in  connection 
with  the  paper. 

Mr.  Cue  is  a  warm  supporter  of  the  republican  party,  in  behalf  of  whose  interests 
he  has  never  spared  himself,  but  he  has  never  held  public  office,  although  he  has  been 
tendered  many  nominations.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Woodmen 
of  the  World,  and  the  United  Artisans,  but  has  given  his  time  more  particularly  to  the 
Improved  Order  of  Red  Men,  in  which  he  has  filled  all  the  chairs  of  the  city  and 
state  organizations  and  has  been  twice  the  representative  of  Oregon  in  the  great 
council  of  the  order. 

In  1897  Mr.  Cue  was  married  at  Sedalia,  Missouri,  to  Miss  Catharine  Anduss,  who 
is  a  daughter  of  Richard  and  Minnie  Anduss,  a  pioneer  family  of  Missouri.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Cue  are  the  parents  of  one  daughter,  Ruby,  the  wife  of  Arthur  Kirtland,  of 
Atascabero,  California.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Cue  take  an  active  part  in  the  social  and  cultural 
activities  of  The  Dalles  and  are  ever  found  on  the  side  of  all  movements  designed 
to  advance  the  welfare  of  the  city  in  which  they  are  popular  and  prominent  residents. 


DANIEL  J.  COOPER. 


Daniel  J.  Cooper  is  now  living  practically  retired  at  The  Dalles  but  for  many 
years  was  most  extensively  identified  with  farming  interests  in  this  section  of  the 
state.  He  has  also  been  a  well  known  figure  in  republican  circles  and  has  again  and 
again  served  as  a  delegate  to  the  conventions  of  his  party.  Mr.  Cooper  is  a  native 
son  of  Tennessee,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Bradley  county,  that  state,  in  1836,  his 
parents  being  Elbert  E.  and  Nancy  (Wann)  Cooper.  His  father  was  a  native  of 
Kentucky,  as  were  his  parents,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  George  Frederick  Cooper.  The  great- 
grandfather was  of  German  parentage  and  during  the  days  of  the  Revolutionary  war 
was  so  intensely  an  American  that  he  dropped  the  name  of  George  because  it  was 
the  name  of  the  reigning  sovereign  of  England  and  became  Frederick  Cooper.  He 
fought  bravely  with  the  American  troops,  thus  aiding  in  winning  national  independ- 
ence, and  he  married  Dorothy  Call,  a  representative  of  another  family  of  North  Caro- 
lina represented  in  the  Revolutionary  war.  The  Wann  family  likewise  comes  of 
Revolutionary  stock  and  was  established  in  Virginia  in  colonial  days.  The  grand- 
mother of  Daniel  J.  Cooper  was  a  daughter  of  Clayton  Stockton,  who  served  with 
distinction  in  the  War  of  1812. 

Daniel  J.  Cooper  was  educated  in  Missouri  and  when  twenty  years  of  age  crossed 
the  plains  with  ox  team  and  wagon  to  California,  where  he  spent  three  years.  In 
1861  he  returned  east  and  served  gallantly  in  the  Civil  war.  In  1863  he  became  a 
resident  of  Polk  county,  Oregon,  where  he  took  up  the  occupation  of  farming  and  stock 
raising,  which  he  there  followed  successfully  for  fourteen  years.  For  three  years  he 
was  also  engaged  in  merchandising  and  afterward  removed  to  Silverton  Mills,  where 
he  again  established  and  successfully  conducted  a  mill  for  two  years.  In  187S  he 
became  a  resident  of  Wasco  county  and  here  purchased  a  farm  of  twenty-nine  hundred 
acres,  of  which  sixteen  hundred  acres  is  tillable.  For  many  years  he  was  one  of  the 
leading  agriculturists  of  Wasco  county  but  is  now  practically  living  retired  and  has 
sold  all   of  his  lands   save  one  hundred   and   seventy-three  acres. 

In  1861  Mr.  Cooper  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Arveneza  Spillman,  a  daughter 
of  Nathan  Spillman  of  Kentucky,  and  they  have  the  following  children:  Charles  C, 
a  business  man  of  Dufur,  Oregon;  Elbert  N..  who  is  a  stock  raiser  of  Billings,  Mon- 
tana; Cyrus,  filling  the  office  of  county  assessor  of  Wasco  county;  Daniel  J.,  a  farmer 
of  Wyoming;  Avery  J.,  a  colonel  in  the  United  States  army;  James  A.,  who  is  en- 
gaged in  the  automobile  business  at  The  Dalles;  Kenneth  L.,  of  the  United  States 
vocational  training  service;  Dr.  Belle  Ferguson,  who  is  a  widow  and  lives  in  Port- 
land, Oregon;  Mrs.  Mary  Thompson  of  Lewiston,  Idaho;  Mrs.  Nancy  Thomas  of 
Troutdale.  Oregon;  Mrs.  Prudence  Bailey  of  The  Dalles;  Mrs.  Ruth  Fish  of  Los 
Angeles,   California;    Bingilia,   the   wife   of  H.   E.  Northrup   of  Portland;    and   Mildred, 


DANIEL   J.   COOPER 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  243 

the  wife  of  Francis  W.  Galloway,  who  is  district  attorney  for  Wasco  and  Hood  River 

counties. 

Mr.  Cooper  has  long  figured  prominently  in  the  puhlic  life  of  his  community  and 
is  a  consistent  republican,  who  many  times  has  served  as  a  delegate  to  the  political 
conventions,  being  so  honored  in  1920,  when  he  was  made  a  delegate  to  the  repub- 
lican national  convention  in  Chicago.  His  popularity  was  shown  by  the  fact  that  he 
ran  ahead  of  his  ticket  when  elected  a  delegate.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Sons  of 
the  American  Revolution  and  also  of  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic  and  has  long 
been  an  active  and  consistent  member  of  the  Congregational  church.  For  the  past 
few  years  he  has  lived  at  The  Dalles,  where  he  is  uniformly  esteemed  and  respected. 
He  is  a  firm  believer  in  the  future  of  this  community  and  has  labored  earnestly  for 
the  betterment  of  all  local  conditions  as  a  matter  of  patriotism  and  devotion  to  the 
district.  Throughout  his  entire  life  he  has  displayed  the  same  spirit  of  loyalty  which 
caused  him  to  go  to  the  defense  of  the  Union  and  follow  the  nation's  starry  banner 
on  the  battle  fields  of  the  south. 


CHRISS  ALEXANDER  BELL. 

Chriss  Alexander  Bell,  member  of  the  Portland  bar,  engaging  in  general  law 
practice,  was  born  in  Canemah,  Oregon,  October  6.  1874,  his  parents  being  Miles  and 
Jane  Gilbert  Bell.  The  father  was  a  native  of  Ohio,  while  the  mother  was  born  in 
Portland.  She  was  a  daughter  of  Delos  Jefferson,  a  pioneer  teacher  of  this  city  and 
the  builder  of  the  first  schoolhouse  in  Portland. 

Chriss  A.  Bell  obtained  his  education  in  the  graded  schools  of  East  Portland  and 
in  early  life  took  up  steamboating.  Ambitious  to  enter  upon  a  professional  career, 
however,  he  turned  to  the  law  and  while  engaged  in  steamboating  devoted  his  leisure 
hours  to  the  mastery  of  the  principles  of  jurisprudence  and  when  feeling  qualified  for 
active  practice  sought  and  secured  admission  to  the  bar.  This  was  in  1896  and 
through  the  intervening  period,  covering  almost  a  quarter  of  a  century,  he  has  engaged 
in  the  general  practice  of  law.  The  court  records  bear  testimony  to  his  ability,  for 
he  has  been  associated  with  various  important  cases  and  has  won  many  verdicts  favor- 
able to  his  clients.  As  the  years  have  passed  he  has  also  become  interested  in  various 
corporations  and  has  derived  therefrom  a  substantial  annual  income. 

On  the  3d  of  August,  1904,  Mr.  Bell  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Charlotte 
May  Bennett  and  they  have  become  parents  of  four  children:  Edna  Ellen,  Robert 
Reed,  Howard  Jefferson  and  Frederick  Alexander. 

Mr.  Bell  is  a  veteran  of  the  Spanish-American  war,  having  served  as  a  corporal 
in  Company  H  of  the  Second  Oregon  Infantry  throughout  the  period  of  hostilities. 
He  went  on  the  first  expedition  to  Manila.  His  political  support  is  given  to  the 
republican  party  and  he  has  strongly  endorsed  its  principles  since  attaining  his  ma- 
jority. He  is  an  exemplary  representative  of  the  Masonic  fraternity,  having  attained 
the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Scottish  Rite,  while  with  the  Nobles  of  the  Mystic 
Shrine  he  has  crossed  the  sands  of  the  desert.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Multnomah 
Club  and  the  Chamber  of  Commerce. 


JACOB  THOMPSON  RORICK. 

Some  two  hundred  years  ago  and  about  forty  years  before  the  Declaration  of 
Independence,  the  first  Jacob  T.  Rorick  landed  in  America  and  settled  on  the  river 
that  bears  the  name  of  his  fellow  countryman,  Henrich  Hudson.  This  first  Jacob  T. 
Rorick  was  the  great-grandfather  of  Jacob  Thompson  Rorick,  of  The  Dalles.  The 
latter's  parents  were  Mark  and  Ann  E.  (Moore)  Rorick,  who  were  natives  of  New 
Jersey,  and  in  that  state  he  was  born  in  1853.  His  grandmother  Moore  was  an  aunt 
of  Rev.  John  Russell,  who  was  a  candidate  of  the  prohibition  party  for  president. 

Mr.  Rorick  was  educated  in  the  district  schools  of  Michigan,  where  he  was  sent 
on  the  death  of  his  parents  to  live  with  an  uncle.  Later  he  entered  the  Oak  Grove 
Academy,  after  which  he  taught  school  for  a  time,  in  the  meanwhile  taking  a  course 
at  the  State  Normal  School  at  Ypsilanti.  He  then  began  the  study  of  law  and  took 
a  law   course  at  the  Michigan   State   University.     For   some   reason   he   abandoned   the 


244  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

practice  of  law  and  turned  his  attention  to  the  newspaper  business,  becoming  editor 
and  publisher  of  the  Bad  Axe  Democrat,  which  he  conducted  for  eight  years,  and 
during  this  time  he  was  appointed  postmaster  of  Bad  Axe,  Michigan,  by  President 
Cleveland,  serving  in  that  office  for  four  years. 

It  was  in  1892  that  Mr.  Rorick  came  to  Oregon,  locating  at  Grand  Haven  on  the 
opposite  side  of  the  river  from  The  Dalles.  There  he  secured  twenty-three  hundred 
acres  of  land  and  of  this  he  still  owns  thirteen  hundred  acres.  He  also  has  one  hun 
dred  and  eighty  acres  in  Benton  county,  Washington,  under  ditch,  devoted  to  fru 
and  alfalfa.  He  has  given  much  attention  to  cattle  raising  and  was  one  of  the  organ 
izers  of  the  Castle  Rock  Land  Association.  While  in  the  cattle  business,  Mr.  Rorick 
always  believed  in  full-blooded  sires  and  his  Durham  bulls  were  all  of  registered  stock 
Closing  out  his  cattle  business,  he  took  up  dairying  and  used  only  Jerseys,  again  adher 
ing  to  registered  sires.  Since  1909  he  has  practically  retired  from  active  connection 
with  farm  work. 

Mr.  Rorick  has  always  evinced  an  interest  in  public  affairs,  though  in  no  sense  is 
he  a  politician.  He  has  served  on  the  school  board;  was  twice  candidate  for  iiiayor 
of  The  Dalles,  and  for  eight  years  served  as  one  of  the  city  water  commissioners. 
He  served  as  a  director  of  The  Dalles  Chamber  of  Commerce  from  1915  to  1917,  when 
he  was  elected  president  of  that  body,  occupying  that  office  until  1919.  He  is  vice- 
president  of  the  Oregon  State  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  one  of  the  five  eastern 
Oregon  directors  of  that  important  organization.  He  has  been  a  Mason  for  forty-six 
years,  and  a  Knight  Templar  for  twenty-eight  years.  He  has  held  all  of  the  chairs 
in  the  blue  lodge  and  is  a  Noble  of  the  Ancient  Arabic  Order  of  Nobles  of  the  Mystic 
Shrine. 

In  1881  Mr.  Rorick  was  married  to  Miss  Carrie  E.  Eldridge,  whose  great-grand- 
father was  a  soldier  in  the  Revolutionary  war.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Rev.  H.  P. 
Eldridge,  a  Baptist  clergyman  of  the  middle  west,  who  left  his  pulpit  and  fought 
gallantly  with  the  Federal  army  during  the  Civil  war.  The  living  children  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Rorick  are:  Mark,  who  is  a  chief  yeoman  in  the  United  States  navy,  Faye,  wife 
of  Clifton  Condon,  of  The  Dalles;  Jay  T.,  Jr.,  and  E.  H.,  a  supercargo  in  the  service 
of  the  United  States  shipping  board.  There  are  eight  grandchildren  two  of  whom 
Jay  T.,  3rd,  and  Elizabeth,  they  are  rearing. 


NATHAN    KOONTZ    SITTON. 

On  the  pages  of  Oregon's  pioneer  history  the  name  of  Nathan  Koontz  Sitton  is 
clearly  and  indelibly  inscribed.  He  arrived  in  this  state  in  1843  when  the  work  of 
civilization  had  scarcely  been  begun  in  the  northwest.  Few  indeed  were  the  settle- 
ments within  the  state.  Its  great  forests  were  uncut,  its  streams  unbridged,  its  lands 
unclaimed  and  the  red  man  practically  everywhere  had  dominion.  Mr.  Sitton  was 
born  in  Fulton,  Callaway  county,  Missouri,  September  2,  1825,  a  son  of  Franklin  Sit- 
ton, who  was  a  native  of  Tennessee  and  of  Scotch  descent,  his  ancestors  having  come 
to  America  at  an  early  period  in  the  colonization  of  the  new  world.  His  gi-andfather, 
Jeffery  Sitton,  was  born  near  Nashville,  Tennessee,  and  during  the  Revolutionary 
war  was  engaged  in  forwarding  horses  to  the  American  forces.  His  son,  Franklin 
Sitton,  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Rebecca  Austin,  who  was  born  in  Virginia  but 
was  reared  in  Kentucky.  Her  father  was  John  Austin.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Franklin  Sit- 
ton  became    the    parents    of    five   children,    Nathan    K.    being   the    eldest    son. 

Reared  in  his  native  state  to  his  seventeenth  year  Nathan  K.  Sitton  then  started 
on  a  trip  to  Oregon,  accompanied  by  two  other  young  men  and  while  en  route  in  some 
unexplained  manner  he  acquired  the  sobriquet  of  "Doc."  by  which  he  was  ever  after- 
ward known.  His  associates  on  the  journey  were  Tom  Brown  and  John  Cox.  They 
traveled  by  wagon  to  Fort  Laramie  and  Mr.  Sitton  drove  a  team  to  Fort  Hall  for  a 
Mr.  Vance.  Each  of  the  young  men  had  a  horse  and  they  obtained  pack  mules  and 
completed  their  journey  in  that  manner.  After  leaving  Fort  Hall  Mr.  Brown  was 
taken  ill  and  the  others  cared  for  him  as  well  as  they  could,  getting  him  safely  through 
to  The  Dalles.  On  one  occasion  Mr.  Sitton  became  separated  from  his  companions  and 
at  length  was  taken  in  by  Indians  and  fed  on  dried  fish  skins,  which  he  claimed  was 
the  best  food  he  ever  ate,  so  nearly  famished  was  he.  When  the  three  young  men 
finally  reached  The  Dalles  they  were  joined  by  two  brothers  of  the  name  of  Eaton.  A 
horse  was  exchanged  for  a  canoe  and  the  Eatons  and  Mr.  Cox  brought  their  companion 


HISTOKY  OF  OREGON  245 

in  the  canoe  down  the  Columbia  river  and  up  the  Willamette  to  Oregon  City,  -while 
Mr.  Sitton  made  the  trip  across  the  country  with  the  animals,  arriving  after  the  others. 
The  good  Dr.  McLoughlin  of  revered  memory  called  to  see  the  sick  man  and  exclaimed, 
"Tut,  tut!  Will  you  let  a  man  die?"  He  then  sent  for  a  boat  and  Indians  and  sent 
Brown  and  Cox  to  Vancouver,  where  the  sick  man  was  cared  for  by  Dr.  Barkley  for 
four  weeks,  at  the  end  of  which  time  he  had  sufficiently  recovered  to  need  no  longer 
medical  attention  although  Mr.  Cox  remained  with  him  for  two  weeks  longer.  The 
doctor's  charges  were  but  twenty  dollars  and  the  patient  was  told  that  he  could  pay 
when  he  was  able.  This  little  incident  is  but  characteristic  of  the  kindliness  and  help- 
fulness which  Drs.  McLoughlin  and  Barkley  continuously  extended  to  the  immigrants. 

It  was  on  the  2d  of  May,  1843,  that  Mr.  Sitton  left  his  Missouri  home  and  on 
the  15th  of  October  arrived  In  Oregon  City  to  find  that  his  comrades  had  gone  on  to 
Vancouver.  Said  a  contemporary  writer:  "There  he  stood,  a  big,  ragged  boy,  bare 
to  his  knees,  the  legs  of  his  trousers  having  been  worn  off  against  the  low  brush  as  he 
came  over  the  mountains.  His  animals  were  lean  and  worn  by  the  privations  of  a 
long  journey  and  thus  he  stood,  leaning  against  a  log  in  this  great  and  comparatively 
uninhabited  country,  when  old  Mr.  Gertman  walked  up  to  him  and  asked,  'Do  you  know 
Doc  Sitton?'  He  replied,  'I  am  Doc  Sitton.'  'Well,  then,  come  to  my  house  and  stay 
with  me,'  was  the  rejoinder.  Mr.  Sitton  thought  it  would  not  be  right  to  go  without 
telling  him  that  he  had  no  money.  The  answer  was,  'Never  mind;  none  of  us  have 
any  money  here.  Your  comrades  have  been  here  and  have  been  sent  back  to  Van- 
couver to  the  doctor,  and  they  told  us  you  were  coming  and  to  look  after  you.'  So  they 
went  to  the  house  together,  and  as  young  Sitton  sat  by  the  fire,  a  stranger  asked, 
'Is  that  all  the  pants  you  have?"  He  replied,  'My  other  clothes  are  at  Vancouver,' 
whereupon  the  man  said,  'I  will  give  you  the  cloth  for  a  pair  if  you  can  get  them 
made,'  and  the  lady  of  the  house  said  to  him,  'I  will  make  them  for  you,'  so  that  by 
night  of  the  next  day  Mr.  Sitton  had  a  new  pair  of  trousers  and  there  was  no  charge 
of  any  kind.  Moreover,  his  hostess  said:  'My  son,  you  can  go  into  the  pantry  whenever 
you  like  and  eat  all  the  bread  and  meat  you  want.  I  crossed  the  plains  last  year  and 
know  how  hungry  you  are.'  "  Such  kindnesses  were  characteristic  of  the  Oregon  pio- 
neers and  they  made  such  an  impression  upon  Mr.  Sitton  that  his  own  course  always 
was  not  only  a  duplicate  of  the  helpfulness  which  he  had  received  but  he  often  "bet- 
tered the  instructions."  His  home  was  always  open  to  anyone  and  his  hospitality  was 
unbounded. 

Mr.  Sitton  began  working  at  whatever  task  he  could  find.  He  made  shingles  at 
the  mouth  of  the  Clackamas  and  on  the  1st  of  December  went  to  the  mouth  of  the 
Yamhill,  stopping  at  Mr.  Labontee's.  From  that  point  he  proceeded  six  miles  to  a 
place  where  he  assisted  in  building  a  cabin  for  a  young  man  and  his  wife  who  were 
just  starting  out  on  a  donation  claim  there.  Later  Mr.  Sitton  was  employed  as  a 
mason  tender  in  building  the  institute  at  Salem,  his  employer  being  a  Mr.  Gray.  Later 
he  worked  in  a  sawmill  at  Salem  until  March,  1844,  and  then  went  to  Astoria,  where  he 
was  employed  for  six  weeks.  Subsequently  he  went  up  the  river,  where  he  assisted 
in  building  a  sawmill  and  from  there  proceeded  to  Oregon  City  where  he  engaged 
in  sawmill  work  for  the  mission.  He  afterward  proceeded  to  The  Dalles,  going  up 
the  river  in  a  canoe  and  bringing  back  a  number  of  wagons  in  a  bateau  belonging  to 
Dr.  McLoughlin.  In  the  autumn  of  1844  he  took  up  his  abode  on  a  donation  claim  in 
Yamhill  county.  Charles  Fendle  had  taken  up  the  claim  and  they  kept  bachelors' 
hall  for  a  time.  When  Mr.  Fendle  desired  to  return  to  the  east  Mr.  Sitton  purchased 
his  interest  in  the  claim,  which  he  later  exchanged  for  a  tract  of  six  hundred  and 
forty  acres  on  which  his  remaining  days  were  passed  and  which  he  converted  into  one 
of  the  fine  and  beautiful  farms  of  Oregon. 

On  the  22d  of  April,  1847,  Mr.  Sitton  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Priscilla 
Rogers,  a  native  of  Indiana  and  a  daughter  of  Lewis  Rogers,  who  was  one  of  the  hon- 
ored pioneers  of  Oregon  of  1846.  The  young  married  couple  journeyed  to  their  home 
on  horseback,  Mr.  Sitton's  outfit  consisting  of  a  buffalo  robe  and  blanket,  while  his 
wife's  possessions  included  a  feather  bed  and  a  set  of  cups  and  saucers.  They  also  had 
a  teakettle  without  a  cover,  a  Hudson's  Bay  frying  pan  with  a  long  handle  and  her 
parents  gave  her  money  with  which  to  buy  a  coffee  pot.  Such  was  their  supply  of 
household  goods,  but  brave  hearts  were  undiscouraged  by  the  hardships  and  priva- 
tions of  pioneer  life.  In  the  autumn  of  1848.  attracted  by  the  gold  discoveries  of 
California,  Mr.  Sitton  went  to  the  mines  where  he  remained  from  September  until 
Christmas,  being  located  on  the  north  fork  of  the  American  river.  He  was  quite 
successful  in  his  mining  operations  and  with  two  others  took  out  two  ounces  of  gold 


246  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

in  a  day  and  in  the  course  of  five  months  Mr.  Sitton  had  accumulated  twelve  hun- 
dred dollars  with  which  he  returned  home  by  way  of  San  Francisco,  being  fourteen 
days  on  the  sea.  Thereafter  he  remained  on  the  farm,  devoting  his  attention  to  the 
raising  of  grain  and  also  to  some  extent  handling  cattle  and  horses. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sitton  were  born  nine  children:  Charles  E.,  born  July  6, 
1848,  died  April  19,  1890;  Amanda  Ellen,  born  January  23,  1850,  died  in  infancy;  Caro- 
line E.,  born  October  21,  1851,  became  the  wife  of  L.  C.  Rogers,  and  has  since  passed 
away;  Ora  Ann,  born  October  23,  1854,  married  John  McCuUough  and  died  April  4, 
1881;  Ella  W.,  born  February  16,  1858,  passed  away  on  the  9th  of  March  of  the  same 
year;  Harry  W.,  was  born  August  11,  1859;  Noah  H.  was  born  April  29,  1862;  Fred  D. 
was  born  February  23,  1865,  and  has  passed  away;  and  Elbridge  D.,  born  September 
23,  1867.  The  wife  and  mother  passed  away  June  22,  1869,  thus  leaving  Mr.  Sitton 
with  the  care  of  a  large  family  of  young  children.  On  the  31st  of  January,  1871,  he 
wedded  Mrs.  Mary  (Shelley)  Laughlin,  a  daughter  of  Michael  and  Sena  Shelley  who 
were  Oregon  pioneers  of  1848.  Mrs.  Sitton  had  two  children  by  her  first  marriage, 
Leslie  G.  and  Effie  R.,  the  latter  now  Mrs.  Addie  Brawly,  of  McMinnville.  Five  chil- 
dren were  born  of  the  second  marriage:  F.  Ward,  born  February  24,  1872;  Pratt  K., 
February  24,  1875;  Minnie  G.,  June  26,  1877;  Jennie  G.,  February  20,  1882;  and  Sena 
S.,  April  7,  1884. 

Mrs.  Sitton  was  a  consistent  member  of  the  Christian  church.  While  Mr.  Sitton 
did  not  hold  membership  in  any  religious  organization  he  was  a  believer  in  the  Bible 
and  in  Christianity  and  gave  freely  to  the  support  of  the  Gospel.  He  belonged  to  the 
Masonic  fraternity  of  which  he  was  long  an  exemplary  representative  and  he  gave  his 
political  allegiance  to  the  democratic  party.  He  was  a  man  of  great  kindliness  of 
heart  and  he  reared  several  children  who  were  orphans,  giving  to  them  good  educa- 
tional advantages  to  enable  them  to  make  a  good  start  in  life.  He  stood  as  a  splendid 
representative  of  that  type  of  Oregon  pioneers,  who,  coming  to  the  state,  were  ever 
ready  to  extend  a  helping  hand  to  others  and  who  laid  broad  and  deep  the  foundation 
upon  which  the  present  prosperity  and  progress  of  Oregon  rests. 


MORRILL    EARL   RITTER. 


Morrill  Earl  Ritter,  president  and  manager  of  the  Roseburg  Undertaking  Com- 
pany and  coroner  of  Douglas  county,  is  one  of  the  representative  citizens  of  Roseburg. 
He  was  born  in  Williams  county,  Ohio,  in  1873,  a  son  of  William  H.  and  Catharine 
(Severns)  Ritter,  the  former  a  descendant  of  an  old  New  York  family  and  the  latter 
of  a  pioneer  New  England  family  who  came  to  this  country  in  pre-Revolutionary  days. 
In  his  youth  William  H.  Ritter  served  his  country  in  the  Civil  war  as  a  soldier  of  the 
Union  army  and  is  still  residing  on  the  home  place  in  Ohio.  He  is  known  throughout 
the  community  as  a  stern  but  very  just  man. 

After  completing  his  education  Morrill  Earl  Ritter  remained  on  his  father's  farm 
until  he  was  twenty-one  years  of  age,  when  he  sought  other  work,  having  no  particular 
line  of  business  in  mind.  His  first  occupation  was  that  of  meat  dealer  but  he  soon 
found  that  line  was  not  to  his  liking  and  sold  out  at  the  end  of  eighteen  months. 
After  essaying  other  lines  of  endeavor  he  entered  a  school  of  embalming  and  funeral 
directing  at  Detroit,  Michigan,  receiving  his  diploma  in  1900.  He  remained  in  that 
city  for  three  years,  when  on  account  of  the  ill  health  of  his  wife,  he  went  to  California 
for  one  year  and  located  at  Los  Angeles.  He  subsequently  returned  to  Michigan,  where 
he  practiced  in  Jackson  for  a  period  and  then  again  came  west,  locating  in  Seattle, 
Washington.  In  1911  he  removed  to  Roseburg,  where  he  purchased  a  half  interest  in 
the  Roseburg  Undertaking  Company  and  has  been  president  of  that  company  tor  the 
past  decade.  Upon  the  walls  of  his  office  hang  licenses  from  Michigan,  California, 
Washington  and  Oregon  and  his  ability  as  an  embalmer  is  beyond  question.  In  1917 
he  was  appointed  coroner  of  Douglas  county  and  was  twice  elected  to  succeed  himself. 
Mr.  Ritter  has  the  distinction  of  being  the  only  coroner  of  the  county  who  has  been 
recorded  as  having  turned  into  the  county  treasury  moneys  from  the  earnings  of  his 
office. 

In  1901  Mr.  Ritter  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Minnie  Elizabeth  Foster,  a 
daughter  of  William  O.  Foster  of  Jackson,  Michigan,  and  a  niece  of  Senator  Thomas 
Foster.    One  child  has  been  born  to  their  union.  Morrill  E.,  II.     Mrs.  Ritter.  her  health 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  247 

entirely  restored,  is  truly  her  husband's  helpmate  and   is  a  licensed  embalmer,   being 
the  first  woman  to  receive  such  a  license  in  Douglas  county. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Rittei-  is  well  known  as  a  Mason,  an  Odd  Fellow  and  an  Elk 
and  in  the  line  of  his  profession  he  is  a  member  of  the  State  and  National  Associations 
of  Funeral  Directors.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Episcopal  church  and 
Mr.  Ritter  is  a  vestryman  and  clerk  of  the  board.  He  takes  an  active  interest  in  all 
civic  affairs  and  is  readily  conceded  to  be  a  representative  citizen  of  Roseburg  and 
Douglas  county. 


WILBUR  HINES  THOMPSON,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Wilbur  Hines  Thompson,  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  at  Hood  River, 
was  born  in  Braidwood,  Illinois,  in  1892,  his  parents  being  Alfred  and  Elizabeth  Ann 
(Clark)  Thompson,  both  of  whom  were  of  English  descent.  The  father  is  a  clergyman 
of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  a  man  of  much  ability,  who  holds  several 
honorary  degrees.  His  work  in  America  and  especially  in  Oregon  has  been  of  great 
value  to  the  church  and  his  labors  have  been  indeed  potent  forces  in  the  moral  progress 
of  the  communities  in  which  he  has  lived.  He  is  a  man  of  broad  sympathy  as  well 
as  an  earnest  theologian  and  his  ready  understanding  of  his  fellowmen  has  enabled 
him  to  do  splendid  work  in  calling  out  the  good  in  others.  He  has  been  instrumental 
in  erecting  many  churches  during  the  twenty-five  years  in  which  he  has  labored  in 
Oregon.  His  last  charge  was  at  Gresham,  Oregon,  where  he  still  lives,  having  retired 
from  the  ministry.  He  is  greatly  beloved  by  the  people  of  that  locality  and  by  all 
whom  he  has  served  in  his  ministerial  capacity  elsewhere. 

Dr.  Thompson,  whose  name  introduces  this  review,  was  educated  in  the  schools 
of  Dayton,  Washington,  and  in  the  Gresham  high  school  before  entering  the  University 
of  Oregon  at  Eugene.  He  prepared  for  his  professional  career  as  a  student  in  the 
medical  department  of  the  University  of  Oregon  at  Portland,  from  which  he  was 
graduated  in  1916.  He  then  entered  the  Multnomah  Hospital,  where  he  served' for  a 
year.  In  1917  he  took  up  active  practice  in  Newport,  Oregon,  and  when  the  call  to 
the  colors  came  during  the  World  war  he  became  acting  assistant  surgeon  of  the 
United  States  public  health  department,  which  automatically  transferred  him  to  the 
United  States  navy,  and  for  two  and  a  half  years  his  services  were  thus  given  to  his 
country.  Upon  the  cessation  of  hostilities  with  Germany,  Dr.  Thompson  located  at 
Hood  River  and  established  offices  in  the  Elliott  block,  where  he  is  rapidly  building 
up  an  extensive  and  gratifying  practice. 

In  1918  Dr.  Thompson  was  married  to  Miss  Ethel  B.  Wilkinson,  daughter  of 
Alexander  W.  Wilkinson  of  Gresham,  representing  one  of  the  pioneer  families  of  Wis- 
consin. Mrs.  Thompson  had  been  a  classmate  of  her  husband  in  their  high  school 
days  at  Gresham.  She  is  an  accomplished  musician  and  is  also  a  devotee  of  outdoor 
life  and  athletics.  Dr.  Thompson  is  an  athlete,  who  developed  much  skill  and  prowess 
in  that  direction  during  his  college  days.  He  is  a  football  and  baseball  enthusiast 
and  the  love  of  nature  which  is  shared  by  both  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Thompson  results  in 
many  trips  among  the  hills  of  the  Hood  River  valley  and  fishing  excursions  to  its 
mountain  streams,  the  Doctor  claiming  that  his  wife  is  the  best  fishing  comrade  in 
the  state. 


CHARLES  WATEROUS  KELLY. 

One  of  the  most  prominent  and  widely  known  men  in  enterprising  Oregon  City, 
is  Charles  W.  Kelly.  He  has  been  an  important  factor  in  business  circles  and  his 
prosperity  is  well  deserved,  as  in  him  are  embraced  the  characteristics  of  an  unbending 
integrity,  unabating  energy,  and  industry  that  never  flags.  He  is  public-spirited,  giv- 
ing his  cooperation  to  every  movement  which  tends  to  promote  the  moral,  intellectual 
and  material  welfare  of  the  community.  He  is  a  native  of  Oregon,  born  in  this  state 
September  9,  1864,  and  his  parents  were  E.  D.  and  Lucy  (Waterous)  Kelly  who  had 
come  to  Oregon  in  1856.  The  Waterous  family  were  pioneers  of  Michigan.  E.  D. 
Kelly  was  a  native  of  New  York  state  and  first  came  to  Oregon  in  1853,  but  did  not 
remain  at  that  time.     He  became  one  of  the  most  popular  citizens  of  Clackamas  county 


248  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

and  held  several  offices.  He  was  a  member  of  the  city  council  of  Oregon  City  for 
many  years,  was  treasurer  of  Clackamas  county  and  postmaster  of  Oregon  City  under 
the  administration  of  President  Cleveland. 

Charles  W.  Kelly's  education  was  received  in  the  schools  of  Oregon  City  and  im- 
mediately upon  leaving  school  he  went  to  work  in  the  woolen  mills,  his  father  not 
approving  of  idleness.  Here  he  worked  tor  some  time  and  later  entered  Ijusiness  on 
his  own  account,  being  so  successful  that  in  1910  he  retired  from  active  business  life. 
He  is.  howe\-er,  ever  willing  to  serve  his  community  and  to  that  end  is  a  member  of 
the  city  council  of  Oregon  City  and  though  a  democrat  in  a  strong  republican  section, 
he  wields  considerable  influence  on  the  board  because  of  the  fact  that  there  is  no 
man  more  progressive  and  none  more  willing  to  come  to  the  front  with  pure  unself- 
ishness in  all  matters  concerning  the  development  of  his  native  city  and  state  than 
is  Mr.  Kelly.  He  owns  a  farm  near  Canby  but  declines  to  be  considered  an  agricul- 
turist, as  he  claims  that  his  place  is  but  a  spot  on  which  to  spend  his  vacations  in 
peace  and  rest. 

Mr.  Kelly  married  Miss  Martha  Jane  Blount,  a  daughter  of  William  Blount,  an 
Oregon  pioneer  of  1852  and  a  respected  and  well-to-do  farmer  of  Canby.  To  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Kelly  four  children  were  born:  Bernice,  the  wife  of  Dr.  Lester  G.  Ice,  a  promi- 
nent dentist  of  Oregon  City,  who  is  mentioned  elsewhere  in  this  work;  Genevieve  L., 
wife  of  Lloyd  Bernier;  Mrs.  Veta  L.  Barry;  and  Walter  Leo;  the  latter  two  children 
dying  within  a  year  of  each  other — Mrs.  Barry  as  a  result  of  the  influenza,  in  Feb- 
ruary, 1918,  and  Waiter  in  1919.  Walter  had  served  as  a  volunteer  in  the  World  war 
as  a  member  of  Company  A,  Sixty-third  Infantry.  The  loss  of  these  two  children  was 
a  severe  blow  to  their  family  and  to  the  community. 

No  man  in  any  public  office  is  a  more  earnest  representative  of  his  constituents 
than  is  Mr.  Kelly.  He  is  a  firm  believer  that  in  America  the  people  should  be  rulers 
in  fact  as  well  as  in  name,  and  that  the  holder  of  any  public  office  is  but  a  servant 
of  the  people  and  should  follow  their  wishes  and  not  his  own  in  all  public  affairs.  As 
a  progressive  democrat  he  believes  that  his  party  is  the  party  of  advancement,  as  a 
friend  he  can  be  relied  upon  at  all  times,  and  as  a  citizen  he  would  be  an  asset  to 
any  community. 


JACOB  GEIGER. 


Jacob  Geiger,  who  through  the  years  of  his  active  business  life  in  Portland  was 
engaged  in  contracting  and  building,  was  born  in  Germany  in  1856,  a  son  of  Conrad 
and  Christina  Geiger.  The  years  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  were  passed  in  his  native 
country  and  in  1882,  when  twenty-six  years  of  age,  he  came  to  the  United  States, 
settling  first  in  Chicago,  where  he  worked  at  the  cabinet-maker's  trade,  which  he  had 
previously   learned   and   followed   in  his  native  land. 

It  was  in  the  year  1884  on  March  29th,  that  Jacob  Geiger  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  Louise  Bahret,  a  daughter  of  Jacob  and  Louise  Bahret,  who  came  to  the  United 
States  in  1870,  settling  in  Poughkeepsie,  New  York,  where  they  passed  their  remaining 
days.  In  1888,  after  having  resided  in  Chicago  for  five  years  subsequent  to  his  mar- 
riage, Mr.  Geiger  brought  his  family  to  Portland  and  here  established  business  as  a 
contractor  and  builder.  He  was  identified  with  the  furniture  business  in  Portland  and 
thus  contributed  in  substantial  way  to  the  development  and  improvement  of  the  city 
to  the  time  of  his  demise.  He  thoroughly  understood  every  phase  of  the  furniture 
business  and  of  the  scientific  principles  which  underlay  his  work,  and  he  was  widely 
recognized  as  a  man  of  great  thoroughness  and  skill  in  his  chosen  line. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Geiger  were  born  six  children:  Clara,  who  died  at  the  age  of 
thirty-two  years;  Frieda;  Edward  D.,  living  in  Portland;  William  Walter,  who  enlisted 
in  the  Ninety-first  Division,  Company  347,  trained  at  Camp  Lewis,  was  promoted  to 
sergeant,  later  sergeant  major,  spent  one  year  at  the  front  in  France  and  was  in  the 
three  last  battles  of  the  war;  Edward  enlisted  and  was  assigned  as  sergeant  to  office 
work  in  the  war  department  at  Washington,  D.  C;  Eda,  who  died  at  the  age  of  two 
years  and  four  months;  and  one  who  died  in  infancy.  The  family  circle  was  broken 
by  the  hand  of  death  when  on  the  21st  of  June,  1920.  Mr.  Geiger  passed  away.  He 
was  a  member  of  the  Evangelical  church  and  guided  his  life  bj'  the  most  advanced  and 
honorable  principles.  His  political  allegiance  was  given  to  the  republican  party,  which 
he  supported  from  the  time  that  he  became  a  naturalized  American  citizen.     For  almost 


JACOB   GEIGER 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  251 

three  decades  he  lived  in  Portland,  where  he  was  widely  and  favorably  known,  his  busi- 
ness integrity  and  enterprise  winning  him  a  most  creditable  position  as  a  representa- 
tive of  the  industrial  interests  of  the  city. 


JOHN  JOSEPH  SUMMER. 


John  J.  Summer,  a  well  known  citizen  of  The  Dalles,  where  for  several  years  he 
has  been  engaged  in  the  sheet  metal  business,  is  a  native  son  of  Oregon,  born  in 
Portland  in  February,  1890,  his  parents,  John  and  Theresa  (Orthafer)  Summer,  having 
come  to  this  state  in  1S80.  He  was  educated  in  Portland,  where  he  attended  the 
graded  and  high  schools,  and  later  learned  the  trade  of  a  sheet  metal  worker,  after 
which  he  worked  as  a  journeyman  for  some  years.  In  1914  he  determined  to  start 
out  in  business  for  himself.  He  selected  The  Dalles  for  a  location  and  established 
a  shop,  where  he  engaged  in  the  handling  of  sheet  metal  work.  His  progi'ess  was 
steady  for  the  next  three  years,  but  in  1917,  when  this  country  entered  the  war 
against  Germany,  he  became  fired  with  the  desire  to  aid  his  native  land  and,  closing 
his  shop,  he  volunteered  for  service   in  the  aviation  corps. 

Mr.  Summer  was  sent  to  Kelley  Field,  Texas,  where  he  remained  for  about  two 
months,  when  he  was  transferred  to  the  aviation  field  at  Mineola,  New  York.  Shortly 
after  his  transfer  he  was  put  in  charge  of  the  metal  repair  department  of  that  camp, 
which  was  the  repair  station  of  five  flying  fields.  This  was  held  to  be  a  high  compli- 
ment to  Mr.  Summer  but  it  was  in  no  way  to  his  liking,  for  he  was  most  anxious 
to  be  sent  overseas  and  handle  the  Hun  at  short  range.  His  commandant,  however, 
insisted  that  his  ability  as  a  metal  worker  was  of  more  importance  here  at  home  than 
it  could  be  in  Europe,  so  for  the  next  eleven  months  he  remained  in  charge  of  the 
metal  department  of  that  field,  rendering  excellent  service  which  received  due  recog- 
nition. On  February  7,  1919,  Mr.  Summer  was  ordered  to  Camp  Lewis,  Washington, 
for  demobilization,  and  a  few  days  later  he  was  discharged  from  the  service  with  the 
rank  of  first  class  sergeant. 

Following  his  discharge  he  immediately  returned  to  The  Dalles  and  reopened  his 
shop,  where  he  has  since  been  carrying  on  business.  His  plant  has  a  floor  space  of 
sixteen  hundred  square  feet,  is  modernly  equipped  with  all  the  newest  laboresaving 
devices  pertaining  to  the  sheet  metal  trade,  and  he  is  giving  employment  to  a  number 
of  skilled  artisans.  His  place  is  credited  with  being  the  largest  and  most  complete 
of  its  kind  between  Portland  and  Pendleton,  and  there  is  nothing  that  can  be  made  of 
sheet  metal  that  cannot  be  turned  out.  The  trade  of  the  shop  covers  all  the  sur- 
rounding Oregon  counties  and  those  counties  in  Washington  that  border  on  the  upper 
Columbia  river.  Mr.  Summer  has  handled  contracts  for  the  government,  and  the  work 
for  the  Warm  Springs  Indian  reservation  and  for  the  United  States  reclamation  service 
was  turned  out  of  his  shop. 

Mr.  Summer  is  a  Mason  and  an  Elk  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Order  of  Moose 
and  of  the  Sons  of  Herman.  He  has  been  active  in  the  Knights  and  Ladies  of  Security 
and  has  filled  all  the  chairs  in  that  organization.  In  other  directions  he  has  given  of 
his  time  and  ability  toward  the  furtherance  of  all  projects  calculated  to  elevate  and 
advance  the  welfare  of  the  community.  Mr.  Summer  is  a  worthy  son  of  Oregon  and  is 
universally  esteemed  by  his  fellow  citizens. 


GEORGE  WALTER  GATES. 


George  Walter  Gates,  who  for  fourteen  years  has  been  engaged  in  the  wholesale 
lumber  business  in  Portland  under  the  name  of  G.  W.  Gates  &  Company  and  who  has 
likewise  been  connected  with  lumber  manufacturing  interests,  was  born  in  St.  Louis, 
Missouri,  February  17,  1872,  his  parents  being  George  Porterfield  and  Elizabeth  (Emery) 
Gates.  He  is  a  representative  of  one  of  the  old  and  distinguished  American  families. 
His  great-great-uncle  was  General  Gates,  who  served  on  the  staff  of  George  Washington 
in  the  Revolutionary  war.  His  father  was  a  banker  and  miller  of  St.  Louis  who  for 
many  years  conducted  extensive  and  important  business  interests  in  that  city.  To 
him  and  his  wife  were  born  five  children,  three  daughters  and  two  sons. 

G.  Walter  Gates,  the  fourth  in  order  of  birth  in  this  family,  was  accorded  liberal 


252  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

educational  opportunities,  completing  a  course  in  the  Westminster  College  at  Fulton, 
Missouri,  with  the  class  of  1890,  at  which  time  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree  was  con- 
ferred upon  him.  Throughout  his  entire  life  he  has  been  identified  with  the  lumber 
trade.  He  first  went  to  Pittsburg,  Pennsylvania,  where  he  became  associated  with 
the  American  Lumber  Manufacturing  Company,  there  continuing  until  1906,  when  he 
disposed  of  his  interests  in  the  east  and  crossed  the  continent  to  Oregon.  After 
establishing  his  home  in  Portland  he-,  organized  the  firm  of  G.  W.  Gates  &  Company 
to  engage  in  the  wholesale  lumber  business,  selling  only  to  the  trade.  Throughout 
the  intervening  period  he  has  been  active  along  this  line  and  has  developed  a  business 
of  very  extensive  and  gratifying  proportions.  He  also  took  up  the  manufacture  of 
lumber  as  a  member  of  the  St.  Johns  Lumber  Company  and  at  one  time  was  president 
of  the  Oregon  Taxicab  Company,  which  was  organized  in  1909.  He  is  now  concentra- 
ting his  efforts  and  energies,  however,  upon  the  wholesale  lumber  business  and  in  this 
connection  has  developed  an  enterprise  that  is  bringing  most  gratifying  returns.  He 
is  thoroughly  familiar  with  every  phase  of  the>  trade  and  his  close  application,  inde- 
fatigable energy  and  persistency  of  purpose  have  been  the  salient  features  in  winning 
for  him  the  creditable  position  which  he  occupies  as  a  representative  of  lumber  in- 
terests in  the  northwest.  Mr.  Gates  is  a  widower  with  one  child,  a  boy,  G.  Walter, 
Jr.,  who  is  a  freshman  at  Yale  University,  New  Haven,  Connecticut. 

Politically  Mr.  Gates  has  always  been  an  earnest  republican  and  has  given  un- 
faltering support  to  the  principles  of  the  party  without  desire  for  office.  He  attends 
Trinity  church  and  is  a  member  of  the  Arlington  Club,  the  Waverly  Golf  Club  and 
the  Hunt  Club.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  is  much  interested 
in  everything  that  has  to  do  with  the  welfare  and  development  of  the  city.  His  has 
been  a  well  rounded  development.  He  has  never  allowed  business  to  so  monopolize 
his  time  and  attention  that  it  has  excluded  his  connection  with  other  interests  which 
make  for  pleasure  and  for  progress  in  life.  At  the  same  time  in  his  business  affairs 
he  has  displayed  sound  judgment,  combined  with  a  recognition  and  utilization  of 
opportunities,  and  through  an'  orderly  progression  has  advanced  to  a  most  creditable 
and  enviable  place  as  a  representative  of  the  wholesale  lumber  trade  in  this  state. 


WILLIAM  ALFRED  CARTER. 

William  Alfred  Carter  engaged  in  law  practice  in  Portland  was  born  on  a  farm 
near  Greeneville,  Tennessee,  June  7,  1874.  His  father,  Louis  A.  Carter,  was  also  a 
native  of  Tennessee,  born  in  1852.  In  early  life  he  followed  farming  and  while  still 
in  his  native  state  was  married  in  1871  to  Sarah  Carter,  who  was  born  in  Tennessee, 
a  daughter  of  Wiley  B.  Carter.  After  coming  to  Oregon  Louis  A.  Carter  turned  his 
attention  to  mining  and  is  now  engaged  in  mining  at  Douglas,  Arizona.  His  wife 
passed  away  in  Gold  Hill,  Oregon,  in  1893. 

William  A.  Carter  spent  the  first  fifteen  years  of  his  life  in  the  place  of  his  nativity 
and  attended  the  schools  of  Greeneville  until  1889.  In  the  following  year  his  people 
removed  to  Willow  Springs,  Missouri,  and  at  that  place  William  A.  Carter  attended 
high  school  and  later  completed  a  course  in  the  Willow  Springs  Business  College  with 
the  class  of  1891.  It  was  at  that  time  that  his  parents  removed  with  their  family 
to  Gold  Hill,  Oregon,  and  through  the  succeeding  seventeen  years  was  a  resident  of 
that  place,  coming  to  Portland  in  1908.  In  the  meantime  he  had  taken  up  the  study 
of  law  and  was  admitted  to  practice  at  the  Oregon  bar  in  1899.  For  the  past  twelve 
years  he  has  followed  his  profession  in  Portland  and  his  ability  has  gained  him  a 
creditable  place  among  the  able  lawyers  of  the  Multnomah  county  bar.  He  is  an  able 
representative  of  the  calling  to  which  property,  rights,  life  and  liberty  must  look 
for  protection,  thereby  enjoying  the  unqualified  confidence  and  respect  of  his  contem- 
poraries and  colleagues. 

On  the  31st  of  December,  1900,  in  Salem,  Oregon,  Mr.  Carter  was  married  to  Miss 
Ethel  B.  Hughes,  a  daughter  of  the  late  John  and  Emma  P.  Hughes,  pioneers  of  Salem, 
and  they  have  become  parents  of  three  children:  John  Hughes,  born  June  9,  1903; 
Bernice  J.,  born  February  14,  1905;  and  William,  born  October  S,  1907.  The  religious 
faith  of  the  family  is  that  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  Mr.  Carter  takes 
active  and  helpful  interest  in  the  church  work  and  is  now  serving  on  the  official 
board  of  the  First  Methodist  Episcopal  church  of  Portland.  His  political  endorse- 
ment  is   given   to   the   republican   party   and    in    1901    he   was   a   member   of   the   state 


HISTORY  OF  OREGON  253 

legislature  from  Jackson  county,  Oregon.  For  many  years  he  has  been  a  recognized 
leader  in  party  affairs  and  in  1912  was  a  candidate  tor  the  republican  nomination  for 
governor.  In  the  general  assembly  he  introduced  and  urged  the  passage  of  a  bill 
lowering  the  railroad  rates  from  tour  to  three  cents  a  mile.  He  closely  studied  every 
vital  problem  which  came  up  for  settlement  before  the  general  assembly  and  his  posi- 
tion upon  any  important  measure  was  never  an  equivocal  one.  He  is  never  afraid  to 
announce  his  honest  opinion  and  he  has  always  been  actuated  by  a  spirit  of  patriotism 
that  was  strongly  manifest  during  the  war  period.  He  served  on  the  legal  advisory 
board  and  was  one  of  the  official  speakers  for  the  bond  drives  in  the  northwest.  His 
clear  and  forceful  utterances  are  constituted  an  educational  factor  in  enlightening 
the  people  concerning  the  real  issues  and  conditions  that  grew  out  of  the  war.  In 
Masonic  circles,  too,  Mr.  Carter  is  well  known.  He  has  attained  the  Knight  Templar 
degree  of  the  York  Rite  and  is  a  noble  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  is  a  past  grand  master 
of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  having  served  in  1907  and  1908.  He  like- 
wise belongs  to  the  Benevolent  Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  is  a  life  member  of  the 
Press  Club  and  In  these  organizations  enjoys  the  high  esteem  of  all   who  know  him. 


CHAUNCEY  IRA  CALKINS. 


Chauncey  Ira  Calkins,  president  of  the  Bank  of  Sherwood  and  one  of  the  promi- 
nent citizens  of  the  town,  was  born  February  28,  1870,  the  son  of  Sylvanus  and  Hannah 
Elizabeth  (Kilbourn)  Calkins.  Sylvanus  Calkins  came  of  sturdy  Welsh  ancestors 
who  settled  in  America  before  the  Revolution  and  whose  sons  drifted  from  the  first 
American  home  of  the  family  and  have  through  the  years  carried  the  name  with 
credit.  The  grandfather  of  Chauncey  Ira  Calkins  settled  in  the  middle  west,  first  in 
Illinois,  then  In  Missouri  and  later  in  Iowa  where  he  died.  Sylvanus  Calkins,  his  son, 
enlisted  in  the  Mexican  war  from  Iowa  in  1846  and  served  in  the  famous  Mormon 
Battalion,  when  after  much  arduous  marching  they  served  their  country  and  were 
discharged  at  San  Luis  Rey  Mission,  California.  The  members  of  this  heroic  band 
afterward  became  the  pioneers  of  California,  Oregon  and  Nevada,  and  to  them  much 
of  the  important  growth  of  the  Pacific  coast  is  due.  They  made  homes  on  the  coast 
before  the  days  of  the  California  gold  rush  of  1849  and  before  the  pioneers  of  Oregon 
came.  Sylvanus  Calkins  remained  on  the  coast  for  three  years  after  his  honorable 
discharge  from  the  service  of  his  country  and  engaged  in  mining.  Returning  then  to 
the  east  he  met  Miss  Hannah  Elizabeth  Kilbourn,  at  Salt  Lake  City,  and  they  were 
married.  They  lived  in  Utah  until  1853  or  '54  when  they  went  to  Iowa  and  in  1864 
came  across  the  plains  to  Oregon.  His  prosperous  farm  and  property  were  destroyed 
by  the  Indians  in  the  Utah  Indian  wars  and  with  the  remnant  of  his  possessions  he 
located  at  Lafayette,  in  Yamhill  county  where  he  remained  for  four  years.  In  1868 
he  moved  to  Clackamas  county  and  purchased  some  two  hundred  acres  of  land  one 
mile  and  a  half  southeast  of  Sherwood  and  remained  there  until  his  death,  being 
accounted  one  of  the  best  and  most  popular  farmers  in  the  county.  It  was  on  this 
farm  that  his  son  Chauncey  was  born.  He  still  owns  this  farm  and  counts  it  one  of 
his   most  treasured  possessions. 

Chauncey  Ira  Calkins  was  educated  in  the  grades  and  high  school  of  Sherwood, 
later  attending  the  Newberg  Academy.  He  remained  on  the  farm  until  1914  when  he 
became  assistant  cashier  of  the  Bank  of  Sherwood.  In  1919  he  became  cashier  and 
in  a  few  months  was  promoted  to  the  presidency,  which  position  he  still  holds. 
Though  having  devoted  himself  to  the  farm  work  for  so  many  years  of  his  life  Mr. 
Calkins  has  shown  wonderful  adaptability  for  finance  and  is  regarded  as  one  of  the 
most  astute  bankers  of  the  state. 

He  was  married  in  April,  1895,  to  Miss  Ida  Isabella  Fisher,  daughter  of  Green  B. 
Fisher,  one  of  the  pioneers  of  California  and  a  resident  of  Oregon  since  1864.  They 
have  four  children,  Elizabeth  Jane,  who  is  a  teacher  at  Pleasant  View;  Zeneth  Fay, 
a  student  at  the  Newberg  College;  Ralph  Vane  and  Chauncey  who  are  pupils  of  the 
grade  schools  at  Sherwood. 

Mrs.  Calkins  is  one  of  the  leading  women  of  Sherwood  in  social  and  civic  activities. 
Mr.  Calkins  is  a  Mason  and  has  filled  all  the  chairs  in  the  Blue  lodge.  He  is  now 
advancing  in  the  Scottish  Rite  degrees  to  Shrinedom.  He  has  filled  all  the  chairs 
in  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  is  member  of  the  Eastern  Star.  Mr. 
Calkins  was  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Sherwood  Commercial  Club  and  has  been  its 


254  HISTORY  OF  OREGON 

treasurer  since  it  was  organized.  He  is  a  member  of  tlie  County  and  State  Banking 
Societies  and  of  the  American  Bankers  Association.  Tlie  Calkins  home  is  one  of  the 
most  modern  in  the  town  and  is  the  center  of  Sherwood's  social  doings. 


F.  N.  DERBY. 


F.  N.  Derby  is  now  living  practically  retired  in  Salem,  devoting  his  attention  to 
the  supervision  of  his  various  interests,  although  he  still  deals  to  some  extent  in  real 
estate,  maintaining  an  office  in  the  Oregon  building.  In  former  years  he  operated  largely 
in  the  field  of  real  estate,  in  which  he  was  very  successful,  and  his  activities  have 
constituted  a  valuable  element  in  the  substantial  upbuilding  and  progress  of  his  section 
of  the  state. 

Mr.  Derby  was  born  in  Union  City,  Indiana,  on  the  11th  of  October,  1S55,  a  son  of 
George  A.  and  Malinda  (Brown)  Derby.  The  father  was  born  in  Newark,  Licking 
county,  Ohio,  in  1S20,  and  the  mother's  birt